SACPAN 2019

SACPAN canceled due to winter storm

We regret to inform you that SACPAN has been canceled because of a severe winter storm predicted to hit Seattle Friday and Saturday, February 8 and 9. Snow and ice will cover roads and walkways resulting in dangerous travel conditions. Seattle and the University of Washington campus are not equipped to manage these conditions, so out of concern for our colleagues and guests, the SACPAN planning committee decided to cancel the conference. The planning committee is exploring the option of rescheduling the conference.

 

SOUTH ASIA CONFERENCE OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE

Schedule        Keynote        Transportation        Format        Registration

WELCOME

The South Asia Center in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington welcomes you to the annual South Asia Conference of the Pacific Northwest (SACPAN). Founded in 1966 by an interdisciplinary group of colleagues from UW and the University of British Columbia, SACPAN is today a collaborative venture sponsored by South Asia specialists at UW, UBC, the University of Oregon, and other institutions in the region. One of the oldest centers of South Asian migration in North America, the Pacific Northwest is an ideal location for a public conference that promotes a richer understanding of South Asia in global, transnational, cross-border, and transregional contexts.

Stretching across the humanities, social sciences, applied sciences, medical sciences, and professional fields, the South Asia Center is an important intellectual and pedagogical hub for the study of South Asia. A National Resource Center funded by the Title VI program of the United States Department of Education, our mission is to enhance the study of South Asia (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka) on campus, in the community, across the Pacific Northwest, and throughout the United States. The South Asia Center promotes knowledge about South Asia through innovative research, curricular development, graduate student training, and outreach to educational, civic, and business institutions and the general public.

Welcome to Seattle!

Sincerely,
SACPAN Planning Committee

Sunila Kale, Director, South Asia Center and Associate Professor, International Studies
Purnima Dhavan, Associate Professor, History
Radhika Govindrajan, Assistant Professor, Anthropology
Samuel Ostroff, Managing Director, South Asia Center
Lily Shapiro, Doctoral Candidate, Anthropology

The conference program is designed in the hopes that all participants will be able to attend all panels to foster intellectual dialogue, exchange, and collegiality.

Photo: Parijat Jha


DAY ONE: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8

HUSKY UNION BUILDING 145

1:00-1:20PM: REGISTRATION AND WELCOME

1:20-3:00PM: PANEL 1: PERFORMANCE AND TEXTUAL STUDIES

Sreenidhi Krishnan (Washington State University, Vancouver)

“Materials, Meanings, and Mise-en-scène: Understanding the Shaping of Lives and Livelihood on the Sets of Hindi Soap Operas”

Michael Butcher (University of Washington)

“The Emotionology of Anger in Early Buddhist Literature”

Leah Lowthorp (University of Oregon)

“Kutiyattam Theater and the Sanskrit Cosmopolis”

Gaurav Pai (University of Washington)

“Returning the Gaze: A Video essay about Films Division”

Moderator: Anne Murphy (University of British Columbia)

3:00-3:30PM: COFFEE/TEA BREAK

3:30-5:10PM: PANEL 2: INCLUSION, EXCLUSION, IDENTITY

Kyle Trembley (University of Washington)

“Rattus Hierarchicus: Human-Rat Relations, Kinship, and Caste in Rajasthan”

Parijat Jha (University of Washington)

“Humor as Political Intervention”

Arafat Safdar (University of British Columbia)

“Denzil Ibbetson’s Castes of Punjab: Criminals and Criminality”

Janna Haider (University of Washington)

“Borders, Boundaries, and Sites of Elimination: South Asian Labor and Activism in the Pacific Northwest”

Moderator: Sara Shneiderman (University of British Columbia)

YUKON ROOM, THE UW CLUB

5:45pm-9:00pm: Keynote Address and Reception

 

DAY TWO: SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9

HUSKY UNION BUILDING 145

8:30-9:00AM: BREAKFAST

9-10AM: PANEL 3: GENDER, SEXUALITY, REPRESENTATION

Shehram Mokhtar (University of Oregon)

“Orderly Self and Unruly Others: The Production of GLBT, MSM, and Homophobic Muslims in Transnational Documentaries”

Andrew Wright (University of Washington)

“Queer Transformations and Queer Realities in Hinduism”

Alka Kurian (University of Washington)

“#PinjraTod: Bad Girls of the College World”

Moderator: Arafaat Valiani (University of Oregon)

10-10:20AM: COFFEE/TEA BREAK

10:20AM-12PM: PANEL 4: SPACE, PLACE, ENVIRONMENT

James Binks (University of British Columbia)

“Itineraries of a Himalayan Pilgrimage: Infrastructural Impacts on Religious and Environmental Experience”

Olivia Molden (University of Oregon)

“How do Households Define Water Security? Imaginaries and Exploitation in the Kathmandu Valley”

Subik Shrestha (University of Oregon)

“The Syntax of Kathmandu Valley’s Past and Present: A comparative space syntax analysis of the syntactic/street structure of historical and new neighborhoods inside the valley’s ringroad”

Moderator: Pasang Sherpa (University of Washington)

12-12:45PM: LUNCH

12:45-2:15PM: PANEL 5: STATE, NATION, CITIZENSHIP

Wajiha Mehdi (University of British Columbia)

“Spatial dispossession and geographies of resistance of Muslim women: A case study of Aligarh, India”

Deep Pal (University of Washington)

“China in the Indian Imagination: The case of Tibet (1950-1959)”

Bicram Rijal (Simon Fraser University)

“Defecation Habits, State and Sanitary Citizenship in Post-Earthquake Nepal”

Ali Mehdi Zaidi (University of Washington)

“Tareeqa-e-Tabligh: Performance, Propaganda and the ‘Pakistan Movement’”

Moderator: Anand Yang (University of Washington)

2:15-2:25PM: COFFEE/TEA BREAK

2:25-4:05PM: PANEL 6: GLOBAL MENTAL HEALTH

Reetinder Kaur (Panjab University)

“Traditional healing practices among Punjabi Sikh mental health clients in Vancouver: Insights for mental health practitioners”

Anne Marie Tietjen (Western Washington University)

“Developing Mental Health Treatment in Bhutan:  Listening for Bridges”

Benjamin Trnka (University of Washington)

Cognitive Risk Factors for Substance Use: A Study of Juveniles in Conflict with the Law at a New Delhi Rehabilitation Facility

Megan Ramaiya (University of Washington)

Title TBD

Sauharda Rai (University of Washington)

“Hope and Resiliency: Cases of child soldiers and civilian children in Maoist civil war in Nepal”

Moderator: Randall Horton (Seattle University)

4:05-4:15PM: COFFEE/TEA BREAK

4:15-5:35PM: PANEL 7: TEXTUAL COMMUNITIES

Spencer Pennington (University of Washington)

“The Imam with a Thousand Faces: Localization and Cosmopolitan Spirituality within Early Modern South Asia’s Mystical Islamic Traditions”

Sravani Kanamarlapudi (University of Washington)

“Tracing the Arc of Nīti Literature”

Julia Chatterjee (University of Washington)

“Reconstructing Social History from Multi-script Inscriptions of Greater Gandhara: New Models and Methods”

Sukhdeep Singh (University of British Columbia)

“Contrived Contradictions: Understanding the Dasam Granth’s retelling of the Ramayana”

Moderator Christian Novetzke (University of Washington)

5:35-5:45PM: CLOSING REMARKS


Keynote

YUKON ROOM, THE UW CLUB
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8 |6 PM

“Civility, Respect and Co-existence: Caste and Ethnicity in South Asia”Stanford Professor of Anthropology Sharika Thiranagama

Sharika Thiranagama
Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology
Stanford University

An anthropologist, Thiranagama’s research has explores the intersection of political mobilization and domestic life, focusing on highly fraught contexts of violence, inequality, and intense political mobilization. Her major work has been on the Sri Lankan civil war and research with two different minority ethnic groups, Sri Lankan Tamils and Sri Lankan Muslims, exploring the ways in which militancy, political violence and large-scale displacement became folded into intergenerational transmissions of memory and ethnic identification. In new fieldwork (2015-2016) on Dalit communities in Kerala, South India, Thiranagama examines how communist led political mobilization reconfigured older caste identities, re entrenching caste inequities into new kinds of private neighborhood life. She focuses on the household as the prime site of the inheritance of work, stigma and servitude as well as the possibility of reproduction, dignity and social mobility. She is the author of In My Mother’s House: Civil War in Sri Lanka (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011) and co-editor of Traitors: Suspicion, Intimacy, and the Ethics of State-Building (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009), and the special issue CivilityGlobal Perspectives (T Kelly, Forment C, Thiranagama, S. (eds.) Anthropological Theory Volume 18(2-3), June-September 2018) 

Abstract

Questions of respect and recognition are critical to both a long history of hierarchically segmented co-existence, both in terms of caste and ethnicity in South Asia, as well as the incendiary centers of democratic mobilization, transformation and aspiration. In my talk, I move from post war Sri Lanka to rural Kerala, to discuss how ordinary people live together whilst navigating recent transformations due to war and economic mobilization but within long standing hierarchies. I will discuss the differentiated civility of manners that maintains dense relations of caste, and the civility of distance that newly marks ethnic relations, first through how Tamils and Muslims live together after ethnic cleansing and the end of the war in Sri Lanka, as well as the fractures within Tamil communities around unacknowledged caste differences. I suggest that hierarchical forms of caste and class within Sri Lankan Tamil and Muslim society have been challenged by the kinds of egalitarian leveling effects of ethnic mobilization and solidarity. Yet, at the same time, the promise of egalitarian sociality emerges from within already deeply hierarchical worlds. Secondly, I move to new fieldwork on Kerala to briefly discuss how Dalit agricultural laborers navigate the possibility of new forms of neighbourliness built on deep histories of humiliation, subordination and segregation with laborers of other castes and their landlords in rural Kerala. As a whole, the talk reflects upon ordinary struggles to make respect, once a sign of deference, into something that recognizes one’s humanity.


Transportation

Campus is accessible for cyclists, those taking public transportation, and for drivers. For general transportation information visit the transportation services website. Events will be held in the HUB and the UW Club.


Format

In keeping with recent SACPAN tradition, we will follow a “10/10” format: ten minutes for presentation and ten minutes for questions and discussion. This gives each presenter a chance to advance a core idea, receive an equal amount of time for feedback, and maximize participation. It also allows us to ensure that each individual paper gets feedback. Given the format, we particularly welcome proposals on work in progress and from early career graduate students that would benefit from substantive feedback.