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Wilson Center publishes two Jackson School Cybersecurity Initiative guides on emerging cybersecurity issues

January 25, 2018

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Feature Series

Cybersecurity Initiative Highlights

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The Cybersecurity Initiative at the Jackson School’s International Policy Institute has published two research briefs on emerging cybersecurity topics, in collaboration with Digital Futures Project at Wilson Center.

In “Cybersecurity Workforce Preparedness: The Need for More Policy-Focused Education” Jackson School Professor Sara Curran and Cybersecurity Postdoctoral Fellow Jessica Beyer explore ways to bridge the gap in cybersecurity policy. They argue that there should be more cybersecurity policy educational opportunities in the social sciences like those under development in the Jackson School.

In the “Internet of Things Device Security and Supply Chain Management” Jessica Beyer and recent Jackson School graduate Stacia Lee examine new security concerns that Internet of Things (IoT) devices pose. They look to the vulnerabilities in IoT supply chains, outline existing IoT supply chain regulation, and explore the possibility of new policy. Internet of Things devices are devices embedded in everyday objects that are connected to the Internet.

The Jackson School Cybersecurity Initiative, with the generous support of Carnegie Corporation of New York, has partnered with the D.C.-based Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars and its Digital Futures Project since 2016.

This event and publication were made possible in part by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of the author.