About

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies is an internationally recognized leader in advancing the understanding of and engagement in world issues. As one of the oldest and largest schools in the country to offer undergraduate and graduate degrees in international and area studies, we are dedicated to teaching and research that impact nations, communities, educators and individuals.

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies is an internationally recognized leader in advancing the understanding of and engagement in world issues. As one of the oldest and largest schools in the country to offer undergraduate and graduate degrees in international and area studies, we are dedicated to teaching and research that impact nations, communities, educators and individuals.

Jackson School Fact Sheet

About the Jackson School

Situated in the Pacific Northwest, the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies offers unique access to a major hub of innovation and activity in the Pacific Rim, U.S., and globally.

The School is named for the late Senator Henry M. Jackson, in recognition of his interest and support for the School and the field of international affairs. Alumni have graduated to work in a range of fields, including the U.S. government; The White House; major corporations such as Boeing, Microsoft, Starbucks, and CNN; international agencies including The World Bank, United Nations, and the biggest foundation in the world, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; think tanks; universities, and diplomatic missions of foreign governments.

The Jackson School hosts the most U.S. Department of Education-funded National Resource Centers in the country dedicated to public education activities. Our National Resource Centers also award Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships to students throughout the UW, thanks to U.S. Department of Education support.

Education

The Jackson School offers bachelor, master and doctoral degrees. Undergraduates choose from one of seven majors—Asian Studies, Canadian Studies, European Studies, Latin American Studies, Comparative Religion, Jewish Studies, or International Studies—and 17 minors. The curriculum is interdisciplinary and focuses on area studies, international policy issues and skill-based learning. Classes are taught by UW faculty and practitioners from both public and private sectors. Study abroad is strongly encouraged. A highlight of the International Studies major is Task Force, a capstone seminar which requires students to investigate a current global policy issue, write an analysis, make recommendations and present to external evaluators with expertise on the issue.

At the graduate level, we offer 10 programs that lead to a master’s degree. The International Studies program has the broadest focus and is often pursued concurrently with professional degree programs in business administration, marine affairs, forest resources, public affairs, law, or public health. Students who have at least five years of professional experience may apply to a 10-month or two-year part-time M.A. in Applied International Studies.

The Ph.D. in International Studies is for scholars and practitioners who want to develop deep knowledge of areas in the context of specific contemporary global themes, policy challenges and real-world problems. The Jackson School Ph.D. allows for a three-year accelerated program of completion.

The Office of Career Services connects students to internships, an alumni-student mentor program and job opportunities throughout the year. Although not all alumni pursue international careers, many have an international aspect to their career, in public, private, and non-governmental and government sectors.

Faculty

Jackson School faculty represent a broad spectrum of social science disciplines. They are also associated with other departments in the College of Arts and Sciences and other schools and colleges at UW, including the College of the Environment, School of Law, and the Michael G. Foster School of Business. Honors include:

  • 7 UW Distinguished Teaching Awards
  • 2 UW Distinguished Graduate Mentor Awards
  • 1 UW Outstanding Public Service Award
  • 1 UW Distinguished Staff Award
  • 1 UW Undergraduate Research Mentor Award
  • 1 James D. Clowes Award for the Advancement of Learning Communities
  • 1 UW Alumni Association “Last Word” Lecture Award
  • 1 Guggenheim Fellowship
  • 1 Governor’s Writers Award
  • 1 World Educator Award, World Affairs Council
  • 2 National Endowment for the Humanities Awards
  • 1 National Science Foundation Career Award
  • 1 U.S. Institute for Peace Senior Fellowship
  • 1 Lifetime Achievement Award, Association for Asian Studies
  • 1 Third Order of the Rising Sun, Government of Japan
  • President, Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs
  • President, Association for Asian Studies
  • President, American Society for Jewish Studies
  • President, Turkish Studies Association
  • President, World History Association
  • Editor, Journal of Asian Studies
  • Editor, Journal of Japanese Studies
  • Editor, Journal of Korean Studies

Research

The Jackson School offers leading-edge research in global and area studies. Our internationally prominent faculty represent a range of fields in the social sciences and humanities, including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, religion, sociology, and gender, women & sexuality studies. Some notable research projects include: the effects of free-trade agreements on human rights; public health and environmental security; nuclear non-proliferation in Asia; civil society in Asia; Latin America and Europe; defense industrialization in China; the relationship between religion and violence; U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East; history of U.S. foreign policy; the Mexican Revolution; political economy of India, post-Soviet politics; and, politics of indigenous communities.

National Resource Centers

The Jackson School’s commitment to regional, cross-cultural and comparative studies extends well beyond the boundaries of its many formal academic programs. The school has six Title VI National Resource Centers funded by the U.S. Department of Education:

Our National Resource Centers focus on area and international studies, languages and thematic issues, and provide teacher training and critical global education resources for students, K-12 teachers, community college teachers, university faculty and the public at the local, regional, national and international levels.

The Foreign Language and Area Studies Program, commonly known as FLAS, also funded by the U.S. Department of Education, provides academic year and summer fellowships to students in modern foreign languages and related area or international studies. For 2014-2018, the Jackson School received $16 million in funding for FLAS fellowships and for the National Resource Centers, one of the highest in the country.

APSIA

Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA)

The Jackson School is a Member School of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA). APSIA comprises 60+ schools in the Americas, Asia, and Europe dedicated to the improvement of professional education in international affairs and the advancement thereby of international understanding, prosperity, peace, and security. Jackson School Director Reşat Kasaba is currently serving as president of APSIA, for a two-year term (June 1, 2017 -May 31, 2019).

For more information on APSIA click here

Last updated: March 2017