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International Policy Institute Bridging the Gap: Week of the Arctic

June 20, 2017

Author:

Kate Griffith

Arctic Sea Ice. Photo Credit: NASA Goddard Photo and Video
Feature Series

Arctic Foreign Policy Field Experience

International Policy Institute Fellows in the field

  • Arctic Foreign Policy field experience group
  • Representatives from the Permanent Participants at the launch of the Álgu Fund at the Arctic Council’s Ministerial Meeting in Fairbanks, Alaska, May 10, 2017.
  • Gwen Holdmann, Alaska Center for Energy and Power, discusses how Alaska is pioneering new microgrid energy solutions that it hopes to export to other regions around the globe.
  • North by North
  • Brian Berube of the Alaska Native Rural Veterinary Incorporation
  • Local leaders gather at the Arctic Mayors’ Roundtable in Fairbanks.
  • Indigenous Knowledge Roundtable
  • Representatives from the Arctic Council Working Groups and Task Forces share some of the highlights from their departments during the US Chairmanship.
  • Protester at the Defend the Sacred march, Fairbanks, Alaska.
  • U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson poses for a photo with the Pan-Arctic Indigenous Permanent Participant Heads of Delegation to the Arctic Council
  • Renee Sauve, the chair of the Arctic Council's Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment (PAME)
  • Gwen Holdmann, Director, Alaska Center for Energy and Power
  • University of Alaska Anchorage student Christina Hoy
  • #DefendTheSacred Climate Justice rally in Downtown Fairbanks, outside of Morris Thompson Cultural Center
  • IPI Fellows at the Arctic Conference

The International Policy Institute Arctic Fellows in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington, visited Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska in May 2017 for the events held in conjunction with the Arctic Council Ministerial Meetings. In this 5-minute video Kate Griffith captures student experiences including short interviews with some of the Fellows and lead, Dr. Fabbi, concerning the value of field excursions in understanding Arctic foreign policy.

This publication was made possible in part by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York. The statements made and views expressed are solely the responsibility of the author.