Steve Pfaff

Professor, Department of Sociology
Steven

About

Comparative and historical social science, social movements and collective action theory, politics, and religion. Central and Eastern European societies.

He is the author of Exit-Voice Dynamics and the Collapse of East Germany: The Crisis of Leninism and the Revolution of 1989. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2006. It was the winner of the 2004 Social Science History Association President’s Award and has been favorably reviewed by sociologists and historians alike. Other recent work includes “The Religious Divide: Why Religion seems to be Thriving in the United States and Waning in Europe” in Jeffrey Kopstein and Sven Steinmo (Eds.); Growing Apart? America and Europe in the 21st Century. New York: Cambridge University Press (in press); “Will a Million Muslims March? Muslim Interest Organizations and Political Integration in Europe.”, Comparative Political Studies 39/7 (2006): 803-28 (with Anthony Gill); “Explaining a Religious Anomaly: A Historical Analysis of Secularization in Eastern Germany.”, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 44/4 (2005): 397-422 (with Paul Froese); “Exit-Voice Dynamics in Collective Action: An Analysis of Emigration and Protest in the East German Revolution.”, American Journal of Sociology 109/2 (2003): 401-44 (with Hyojoung Kim), “Theory, History and Comparative Political Sociology.”, Research in Political Sociology 12 (2003):285-310 (with Edgar Kiser), and “Replete and Desolate Markets: Poland, East Germany and the New Religious Paradigm.”, Social Forces 80/2 (2001): 481-507 (with Paul Froese). – See more at: http://www.baylorisr.org/scholars/p/steven-pfaff/#sthash.bb59QZAg.dpuf