FLAS Fellowships

FLAS Fellows

United States Department of Education Middle East Center Foreign Language & Area Studies Fellowship Awardees, Academic Year 2020-21

Undergraduate Awardees

Paige Gibson

Paige Gibson (Arabic)
Near Eastern Languages and Civilization, and Spanish and Portuguese Studies

Paige Gibson is a double major in Near Eastern Languages & Civilization and Portuguese Studies. Her proficiency in both Arabic and Spanish has stimulated her interest in the history of Al-Andalus, suggesting a possible research focus for future graduate work. She will be taking advanced Arabic literature and culture courses, as well as courses in regional studies in order to broaden her knowledge of the area as she prepares to continue her academic career at the graduate level.


Juliette Lanser

Juliette Lanser (Arabic)
Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Juliette Lanser is majoring in International Studies with an emphasis on International Human Rights. She is particularly interested in working on Middle East refugee issues. After graduation, she hopes to join the Peace Corps and eventually to take a position with the US Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, or the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), where she can work to celebrate cultural differences and deter systematic isolationism and discrimination based on culture, race, and nationality.


Saeed Mahamood

Saeed Mahamood (Arabic)
School of Public Health

Saeed Mahamood is pursuing his B.A. in Global Health in the School of Public Health. His goal is to become a psychiatrist committed to addressing the health disparities among under-represented minorities. By honing his Arabic language skills, he will be well positioned to help non-English speaking communities from the Arab world obtain appropriate and equitable healthcare in the United States.


Nathalie Paradise

Nathalie Paradise (Arabic)
Near Eastern Languages and Civilization and Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Nathalie Paradise is a double major in Near Eastern Languages & Civilization and the Jackson School. She is strengthening her Arabic language skills through class work, language exchange with native speakers in Egypt and at the UW, as well as participating in the Svoboda Diaries Project hosted by NELC, which translates and analyzes primary source material on Iraq. After continuing her studies at the graduate level, Nathalie aims to enter the diplomatic service.


Elizabeth Peterson

Elizabeth Peterson (Persian)
Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Elizabeth Peterson is majoring in International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School.  She enjoys reading news from Iran and Afghanistan, and thus furthering her understanding of current events and politics in the region.  Studying Persian gives her greater access to Persian language news sources and its rich history of poetry, literature, and cinema.  She eventually hopes to travel to the region and further positive cultural exchange between Iran and the United States.


Graduate Awardees

Gabriella Chamberland

Gabriella Chamberland (Turkish)
School of Social Work and Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Gabriella Chamberland is pursuing both an M.A. in the School of Social Work and an MA in Applied International Studies. Her research centers on both national and multilateral responses supporting Syrian refugees living in Turkey. Through her research, she is developing a comprehensive understanding of social protection measures in place in Turkey, their impact, and the perception of their effectiveness by refugees and nationals. In turn, this will lead to a data-backed awareness  of which aspects have potential to be implemented in other situations of mass migration globally.


Delaney Glass

Delaney Glass (Arabic)
Anthropology

Delaney Glass is pursuing a Ph.D. in Biological Anthropology. Her research focuses on embodiment of stressors in adolescence. She takes a biological, cultural, and evolutionary approach in her work exploring psychosocial stressors, family dynamics, political economy, and their relation to biological markers of stress, disease risk, and health.  She is applying her Anthropological and Near Eastern Studies training through collaboration with researchers and community members in the Jordanian cities of Amman and Irbid to establish the organizational and logistical framework to advance her dissertation research.


Owen Harris

Owen Harris (Turkish)
Evans School of Public Policy and Governance and Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Owen Harris is a concurrent M.A. candidate in the Jackson School and the Evans School. His research in both Public Administration and International Studies focuses on Migration Policy in the Eastern Mediterranean exploring why Orthodox Syrians have much better integration outcomes in Greece, where they adapt to Greek language and identity, while their Syrian Muslim compatriots are considered foreign refugees and face much higher barriers to integration. In 2020, Owen was a Student Trainee in the US State Department’s Pathways Internship program. He aims to pursue a career in International Affairs.


Sophie Ossorio

Sophie Ossorio (Persian)
Middle East Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Sophie Ossorio is pursuing her M.A. in Middle East Studies in the Jackson School. Her research interests center on international security and public policy. She studied Arabic as an undergraduate and will now study Persian as she develops her expertise on Iran. She anticipates doing research on nuclear security in the region, Iran’s influence in Syria, and the political relationship between Iran and Syria. After graduation, Sophie aims to work as a political analyst specializing in the MENA region.


Abigail Massarano

Abigail Massarano  (Hebrew)
School of Art, Art History and Design

Abigail Massarano is pursuing a M.A. in Art History and is currently studying modern Hebrew to better navigate art historical research in Israel.  Her research, which works within the context of the current divisions between Abrahamic religious groups, looks back on Jewish visual and textual exegesis not only to offer an opportunity to find common ground between diverse modern cultures stemming from the same roots, but also to help to find a new perspective on the manner in which strong ideological differences arise. She hopes to contribute to the academic pursuit of religious and cultural insight through the less commonly used lens of art history.

United States Department of Education Middle East Center Foreign Language & Area Studies Fellowship Awardees, Summer 2021

Undergraduate Awardees

Nathalie Paradise

Nathalie Paradise (Arabic)
Near Eastern Languages and Civilization, and  the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Nathalie Paradise is a double major in Near Eastern Languages and Civilization and the Jackson School of International Studies. Nathalie is as an undergraduate researcher in the NELC-sponsored Svoboda Diaries Project, where she reads, transcribes, and prepares for online publication Joseph Mathia Svoboda’s turn-of-the-century diaries on Iraq. Her career goal is to become a public diplomacy officer in the Middle East to promote cultural exchange and stronger relationships between the United States and the Middle East.


Janick Gold

Janick Gold (Arabic)
Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Janick Gold is majoring in International Studies. He is entering the advanced level of his Arabic training and will be doing intensive online instruction this summer at the Qasid Arabic Institute, Jordan. He is interested in the anthropology, politics, and economics of the Middle East, which, with a strong command of Arabic, will prepare him for a career in the U.S. Foreign Service.


Graduate Awardees

Nida Kiali

Nida Kiali (Turkish)
 Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Program in Near & Middle Eastern Studies

Nida Kiali is pursuing a Ph.D. in the Interdisciplinary Program in Near & Middle Eastern Studies. Her academic interests center on the question of Arab identity and the issue of modernity among Palestinians living in Israel. In her research, she will be examining the emergence of Palestinian nationalism, the historical dynamics shaping Palestinian national identity, and why it changed among Palestinians living in Israel.


Munteha Shukralla

Munteha Shukralla (Arabic)
Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Munteha Shukralla is pursuing her M.A. in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. She is passionate about contemporary US-Middle East multilateral and diplomatic relations. In particular, Munteha is interested in the subtle ways humanitarian law, religion, and nationalism impacts how the US formulates its strategy towards the Middle East. Her research will include a comparative analysis of contemporary policies and strategies towards Islam and humanitarianism.


Christopher Tutolo

Christopher Tutolo (Arabic)
French and Italian Studies 

Christopher Tutolo is pursuing an M.A. in French and Italian Studies. His research lies at the intersection of France and the Levant, with a focus on the impact of French colonial presence in Lebanon and Syria following the fall of the Ottoman Empire. With advanced fluency in French, Christopher is concurrently pursuing a graduate certificate in Second and Foreign Language Teaching.