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Jackson School Calendar of Events

For more events you can view each center or program's events page or go to the archive and advanced search link above.

This Week

Click on the title for more details.
Thu Apr 17, 2014
Thu Apr 17, 2014 - Fri Apr 18, 2014
Sat Apr 19, 2014
Sun Apr 20, 2014
Mon Apr 21, 2014
Tue Apr 22, 2014
Wed Apr 23, 2014
Thu Apr 24, 2014

All Events


April 2014
Documentary Film Screening and Q&A with Director: Birth 1871 - History, the State, and the Arts of Denotified Tribes of India

South Asia Center

Thursday April 17, 2014
Time: 4:30 PM
Location: Thomson 101

Film: Birth 1871 - History, the State, and the Arts of Denotified Tribes of India

Sponsor: South Asia Center

Contact: Keith Snodgrass, snodgras@uw.edu

 Birth 1871

In 1871 the colonial government in India officially defined 192 ethnic groups as 'Criminal Tribes' - communities later reclassified as 'Denotified Tribes' (DNTs) in 1952, following India's independence. Human rights violations against DNTs (numbering around 60 million) are one of the most challenging issues in India today, yet their lives are poorly documented. The first of its kind, Birth 1871 combines historical research with film documentary to produce a subject driven textual history and film output, exploring two tribes' experience of India's changing state structures. The film explores processes of 'criminalization' and how DNTs combat social stigma through the theatre arts.

A discussion with director Dakxinkumar Bajrange will follow the screening. Bajrange is an award winning filmmaker, playwright, director and activist. He is also the director of Budhan Theatre, a community theatre group working with the Chhara denotified tribe in Gujarat. To date, Budhan has produced 42 plays and performed more then 1000 shows across the country and created huge awareness across the globe about the socioeconomic and political condition of India's denotified tribes.


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Censors in Modern Korea and Their Colonial Making

East Asia Center

East Asia Resource Center

Jackson School Information

Korea Studies Program

Thursday April 17, 2014
3:30-5:00PM
Thomson Hall 317

Kyeong-Hee Choi, University of Chicago

Center for Korea Studies (uwcks@uw.edu)

 


Kyeong-Hee Choi
Censors in Modern Korea and Their Colonial Making

 

Thomson Hall 317
Thursday, April 17 @ 3:30PM

 

 


 

 


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Climate Change, Global Health, and the Inequalities of Risk: Crossing Borders and Disciplines to Re-map Vulnerability and Resilience

Southeast Asia Center

Thursday April 17, 2014 to Friday April 18, 2014

HUB 145 and Petersen Room, Allen Libraries (4th Floor)

Sponsored by Jackson School of International Studies, Southeast Asia Center, Program on Climate Change, Department of Global Health, Department of Geography, and Department of Anthropology

seac@uw.edu

 


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2nd ANNUAL STUDENTS CONFERENCE IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN LANGUAGES 2014 (INDONESIAN) at the University of Washington

Jackson School Information

Jackson School PhD Program

Southeast Asia Center

Saturday April 19, 2014
9:00am - 3:00pm
Savery 167, University of Washington

Department of Asian Languages and Literature and Southeast Asian Center University of Washington

sandjaja@uw.edu

This one-day conference provides a forum for students who have been learning Indonesian from institutions in the US and around the world to use Indonesian in presenting their research and topic interests. Participants will have the opportunity to share their ideas and gain valuable experience in presenting their work for discussion with other students. Presentation and discussion will be conducted in Indonesian.


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Screening of "Soekarno: Indonesia Merdeka"

Southeast Asia Center

Sunday April 20, 2014
6:30-10:30 pm
Kane Hall, UW Campus, 4069 Spokane Lane, Seattle, WA

Lead actor Ario Bayu and executive producer Amrit Punjabi

Permias Seattle

Lenka Savina 206.4226.6184


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Social Entrepreneurship in Pakistan

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Monday April 21, 2014
Time: 12:00-1:20 PM
Location: : Dempsey Hall Classroom 126 (At Foster School of Business)

Presenter: Junaid Malik

Sponsor: South Asia Center and Global Business Center, Foster School of Business, UW

Contact: Keith Snodgrass, snodgras@uw.edu

Open to all UW students, faculty, staff, and public

• Learn about UW grad, social entrepreneur and filmmaker, Junaid Malik changing the lives of farmers and families in the mountain regions in Pakistan.
• His social startup, Raise d’Bar, is paving a new market for the dried fruits and nuts farmed in the Gilgit-Baltistan region of Northern Pakistan
• Brainstorm with him as he moves to work with Telenor (Telecom company in Pakistan) to create an SMS-based social network equipping farmers with the power of information to strengthen their selling power.

This lunchtime talk is for anyone interested in using business for good in a developing country, who is inspired by a guy who creates a positive impact through a creative business idea – and has the passion to pull it off. Pakistan is a tough place for an entrepreneur. Come hear how this UW grad [2007] in economics and drama and filmmaker has worked with international mentors to create an enticing granola bar in beautiful packaging to appeal the city markets of Lahore, Islamabad and Karachi.

Brought to you by the Global Business Center’s GSEC (Global Social Entrepreneurship Competition) at the Foster School of Business and The Jackson School

Read more about Raise d’Bar here: http://aurora.dawn.com/2014/03/24/the-new-entrepreneurs/
 


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TALK "Before the Catastrophe: New Revelations in Russian, Ottoman, and Armenian Archives regarding the period 1909-1914"

Ellison Center

Monday April 21, 2014
3:00 - 4:30 pm
Tomson 317

Garabet Moumdjian

Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies

shinn@uw.edu

 "Before the Catastrophe: New Revelations in Russian, Ottoman, and Armenian Archives regarding the period 1909-1914"

Bio details:

GARABET K MOUMDJIAN holds a Ph.D. from UCLA in History, where his dissertation explored Armenian and Young Turk Relations in the period 1895-1909. He is currently preparing a monograph on Armenian-Turkish relations for the University of Utah Press. His publications include two academic books, seven book chapters, and about twenty articles in academic journals and periodicals. Since 2002, Dr. Moumdjian has been employed by federal government agencies as a security analyst, consultant, and linguist.

[He has and still continues to conduct research at the Ottoman Archives Directorate (Başbakanlık Osmanlı Arşivi, BOA) in Istanbul. He is currently trying to conduct research at the Ottoman Military Archives Directorate (ATASE) in Ankara.


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Bargaining for Biodiversity in Protecting Canadian Forests

Canadian Studies Center

Monday April 21, 2014
12:30-1:20pm
William H. Hates Hall room 117

Natasha Affolder, Associate Dean Research and International, University of British Columbia

Canadian Studies Center, Environmental Law Initiative at the UW School of Law

canada@uw.edu

Bargaining for Biodiversity

The talk draws on some examples from the Canadian experience, including the negotiation of conservation agreements to protect Canada's forests, as well as situating this phenomenon within a global context.

The proliferation of negotiated agreements to govern biodiversity protection is absent from most leading accounts of environmental law-making, which remain glued to a state-centric model of public law regulation. One of the empirical tasks of this talk is to document and explain this turn to contracts, which is a transnational phenomenon. This demands an unpacking of the market approach to law which underlies these agreements. It invites a closer look at the role of law in establishing the infrastructure within which “clean water, greenhouse gases, and wetlands can be traded as easily as corn or soy beans”.

View Affolder's profile here: http://www.law.ubc.ca/faculty/affolder/


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Modernity in Common: Japan and World History

East Asia Center

Jackson School eNewsletter

Japan Studies Program

Monday April 21, 2014
7:00 - 8:30 PM
Kane Hall 220

Carol Gluck, Columbia University

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Mitsubishi Corporation

For information on details for this event please contact japan@uw.edu

Mitsubishi Corporation Lecture Series 2013-14

   Just as the modern history of a society cannot be explained in isolation from the world, it is also possible to explore the history of the modern world from the vantage point of any particular place in the existing "globeful of modernities." Here that place is Japan, which because it shares commonalities and connections with other modern societies offers the opportunity to think about the “modern” on empirical bases different from the European experiences that underlay earlier theories of modernity. As examples, the lecture takes four questions frequently asked about modern Japanese history from the nineteenth century until the present and places them in their global context -- in the context of “modernity in common."

Carol Gluck is the George Sansom Professor of History at Columbia University. Her field is the history of modern Japan from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, with writings on the political, social, and cultural history of Japan in transnational perspective, World War II, history-writing and public memory in Asia and the West. Her books include Japan's Modern Myths: Ideology in the Late Meiji Period,1985; Showa: the Japan of Hirohito,1992; Words in Motion: Toward a Global Lexicon, 2009; Thinking with the Past: Modern Japan and History, 2014; Past Obsessions: World War II in History and Memory, forthcoming; and in Japanese, Rekishi de kangaeru [Thinking about History], 2007.

Free and open to the public. Registration appreciated. To register go HERE


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Interreligious Dialogue with Jesuits from Asia: “Neighborliness: Seeds, Challenges and the Practice of Interreligious Dialogue in India”

South Asia Center

Tuesday April 22, 2014
Time: 5:30 - 7:00 PM
Location: STCN 160, LeRoux (Seattle University Campus)

Presenter: Fr. Vincent Sekhar

Sponsors: SU College of Arts and Sciences William F. LeRoux, S.J. Endowed Chair, Institute for Catholic Thought and Culture

RSVP: ICTC@seattleu.edu

Fr. Vincent Sekhar attended the University of Madras and is one of the few Christians to receive a doctorate in Jain religion and philosophy. He has served as the Secretary for Interreligious Dialogue for the Jesuit Conference of South Asia and is Executive Director of the Institute of Dialogue with Cultures and Religion, a Ph.D. Research Institute on Comparative Religion & Culture affiliated with the University of Madras.

Fr. Sekhar will examine the way in which terrorism, fundamentalism and matters of social and economic justice have encouraged interreligious dialogue between Hindu and Christian communities.


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Current Military Developments in Ukraine

Ellison Center

Tuesday April 22, 2014
3:00-4:30pm
Allen Auditorium, Allen Library

Lecture sponsored by University of Washington Baltic Studies Program, Polish Studies Endowment Committee, and the Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies.

Glen Grant

Glen Grant is Adjunct Faculty at the Center for Civil-Military Relations, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, and Lecturer at Riga Business School. As a diplomat in the British foreign service (2002-2005), he provided British and NATO Ambassadors with military advice and support, and consulted the government of Latvia on reform of Latvia’s intelligence and security agencies. Prior to 2002, he served as Defense Attache in Helsinki and Tallinn, and NATO Branch Chief, Air Operations Centre 5, Italy.


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De Baixo Para Cima: A Film Discussion with Jonathan Warren and Angelica Macklin

Latin American Studies

Tuesday April 22, 2014
4 – 5 p.m.
Communications 202. University of Washington, Seattle Campus

Contact: uwch@uw.edu; (206) 543-3920

Join Jonathan Warren and Angelica Macklin for a discussion about their new film De Baixo Para Cima, which explores revolutionary change in the Jequitinhonha Valley, in Brazil. The story is told from the perspective of artists, religious leaders, and educators in the town of Araçuai. These cultural activists allied with indigenous communities, labor, and women’s organizations to form an emancipatory movement that has significantly transformed life in the Valley. Legend has it that Araçuai was founded by prostitutes who stood up to a corrupt priest some 150 years ago. They decided to challenge his authority and move up river rather than tolerate his abuse. Many like to believe that this rebellious tradition is why Araçuai became an epicenter of resistance from the bottom up.

Jonathan Warren is Co-Director of the Center for Brazilian Studies and Associate Professor in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies.


Angelica Macklin is a doctoral student in Gender, Women, & Sexuality Studies and a multimedia producer for the National Center of Quality Teaching & Learning at the UW.

Presented as part of the New Books/New Media series, a spin-off of the New Books in Print series at the Simpson Center for the Humanities, which provides opportunities for University of Washington scholars to discuss their recently published books. New Books/New Media expands these dialogues in to a multimedia context.


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Exploring the History and Charting the Crisis: Understanding Ukraine

Ellison Center

Center for Global Studies

Tuesday April 22, 2014
5:30-8:30pm
University of Washington, Thomson Hall Room 101

Global Classroom

Cost: $30, includes presentations, 3 clock hours, resource packet, and light buffet

Join the World Affairs Council, the Ellison Center for Russian, Eastern European & Central Asian Studies, and the Center for Global Studies for this special evening as we grapple with the current crisis in Ukraine. How have Russia and Europe shaped Ukrainian politics over the centuries? What triggered the current political crisis in Ukraine? Who are the major players and how does the current crisis impact Ukraine's neighboring countries?How do we teach our students the complex challenges and opportunities facing this region today? 

First educators will enjoy Ukrainian food and an intimate conversation with our keynote speaker, UW Professor Glennys Young. She will give an overview of the history of Ukraine and explore the Russification of Ukraine that began 250 years ago with Catherine the Great. She will discuss not only the historical and cultural connections from the past, but how Ukraine is economically and strategically important to Russia today. 


Next, we will meet UW graduate student Christi Anne Hofland who lived in Ukraine from 2008 to 2011 and has returned several times since then. She will help us "chart the crisis" that began on November 21, 2013 when the Ukrainian government suddenly suspended preparations for signing an Association Agreement with the European Union. This unleashed a slew of events: from President Yanukovych fleeing Kiev to the March 16 referendum when residents of Crimea voted to break from Ukraine and join Russia.  

Finally, we will discuss classroom resources. How can you keep up-to-date on this region of the world?  What resources can you turn to - and point students to - that will portray various sides of this complicated story? Global Classroom will share common-core aligned lesson plan ideas and articles from our new 50-plus page resource packet on Ukraine.


For more information and to register, click here


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Cambodian Son screening and director Q&A

Jackson School Information

Jackson School PhD Program

Southeast Asia Center

Tuesday April 22, 2014
6:30-8:30pm (doors open at 6)
UW Kelly Ethnic Cultural Theatre 3940 Brooklyn Ave NE

Masahiro Sugano

Southeast Asia Center, JSIS, UW/RUPP Social Work Partnership, School of Social Work, Social Workers Asian Pacific Islanders (SWAPI), Office of Minority Affairs and Diversity (OMA & D), Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center,

seac@uw.edu

Cambodian Son captures the inspirational story of Kosal Khiev’s journey from prisoner in America to world-class poet in Cambodia. The documentary follows Kosal’s life after receiving the most important performance invitation of his career—to represent the Kingdom of Cambodia at the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad. Kosal would travel to London having only taken two flights prior; first, as a 1-year-old refugee child whose family fled Cambodia and, then as a 32-year-old criminal “alien” forcibly returned to Cambodia in 2011. This documentary follows a volatile yet charming and talented young man who struggles to find his footing amongst a new freedom that was granted only through his deportation.

Entry is free but seating is limited so please reserve a ticket at: http://goo.gl/eHPOz6


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Regimes of Censorship in the Arab World before and after the 2011 Revolution

Middle East Center

Tuesday April 22, 2014
7:00 p.m.
Kane 210

Juan Cole

Near East Languages & Civilization

neareast@uw.edu

JUAN COLE is Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History, University of Michigan. His scholarship has focused on the relationship of the West and the Muslim world in historical context. His publications include: Engaging the Muslim World (Palgrave, 2009); and Napoleon's Egypt: Invading the Middle East (Palgrave, 2007).

This presentation is the 2014 Farhat J. Ziadeh Distinguished Lecture in Arab and Islamic Studies.


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Empty Orchestra: Karaoke and Queer Performance

Jackson School Information

Jackson School PhD Program

Southeast Asia Center

Wednesday April 23, 2014
4 pm
Smith 306

Karen Tongson, English and Gender Studies, University of Southern California

Department of History, Department of English, and the Simpson Center for the Humanities

histgrad@uw.edu

In her talk, Karen Tongson uses the global phenomenon of karaoke to re-evaluate prevailing paradigms of originality and imitation in aesthetics, critical theory, queer studies and media economics, while also offering a preliminary account of karaoke cultures and technologies from Asia and the United States. Karaoke is a compound Japanese word: “kara” means “empty,” and “oke” is the contraction of “o-kesutora,” or “orchestra.” Though the conceptual origins of karaoke are largely apocryphal, and have been linked by journalists, enthusiasts, and scholars to folk forms of group-singing and sing-along entertainments across a wide historical span from medieval Europe, to Anglo-American vaudeville, to post-World-War-II Japan (from which the name of the activity is derived), the origins of the first karaoke machines can be traced back to Japan and the Philippines in the early-to-mid 1970s. This presentation will take into account the form’s “machine” invention, and the inter-colonial disputes that have arisen as a result while exploring karaoke’s meaning, and its mobilization as a metaphor for contemporary forms of “copying” and creativity in a post-digital age.

Karen Tongson is Associate Professor of English and Gender Studies at the University of Southern California and author of Relocations: Queer Suburban Imaginaries (2011). Her work has appeared in numerous venues in print and online, including Social Text, GLQ, and Novel: A Forum on Fiction. She is the series editor for Postmillennial Pop at NYU Press, and just completed a multi-year term as co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Popular Music Studies. Her current book project, Empty Orchestra: Karaoke. Critical. Apparatus., critiques prevailing paradigms of imitation in contemporary aesthetics and critical theory, while offering a genealogy of karaoke technologies, techniques, and desires.


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Military Security of Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland

Ellison Center

Wednesday April 23, 2014
7:00-9:00pm
University of Washington, Savery Hall Room 264

Glen Grant

University of Washington Baltic Studies Program, Polish Studies Endowment Committee, and the Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies

Glen Grant is Adjunct Faculty at the Centre for Civil-Military Relations, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, and Lecturer at Riga Business School. As a diplomat in the British foreign service (2002-2005), he provided British and NATO Ambassadors with military advice and support, and consulted the government of Latvia on reform of Latvia’s intelligence and security agencies. Prior to 2002, he served as Defense Attache in Helsinki and Tallinn, and NATO Branch Chief, Air Operations Centre 5, Italy. 


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Visiting Author: Ramachandra Guha, Gandhi Before India

South Asia Center

Wednesday April 23, 2014
Time: 7:00 PM
Location: Stimson Auditorium, Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E Prospect St, Seattle, WA 98112

Presenter: Ramachandra Guha

Sponsors: Seattle Asian Art Museum, The Elliott Bay Book Company, Gardner Center for Asian Art & Ideas, The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Newspapers in Education

Contact: Elliott Bay: 206-624-6600; SAAM: www.seattleartmuseum.org/visit/visitsaam.asp

Gandhi Before IndiaGandhi Before India, the first part of acclaimed Indian scholar and author Ramachandra Guha's massive undertaking, is the occasion for this evening. The author of numerous varied works, including an environmental history of India, an award-winning social history of cricket, and the much-praised India After Gandhi, he is here with this new work that has been many years in the making. “In Gandhi Before India, Ramachandra Guha, one of the subcontinent’s most influential historians, has set himself the revisionist task of challenging this Indo-centric self-portrait of the Mahatma, not merely cleaning the family portrait, but uncovering a new backdrop … Guha’s impressive monograph challenges the Gandhi legend as it was portrayed in, for instance, Richard Attenborough’s Oscar-winning film … [in] this ground-breaking study.” – Robert McCrum, The Guardian. Free admission.

For more information, visit Elliott Bay Books.


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An evening of events related to Rwanda including screening of "Finding Hillywood"

African Studies Program

Center for Human Rights

Center for Global Studies

Wednesday April 23, 2014
6:30 - 9:00 pm
UW Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center Theater | 3931 Brooklyn Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

This event is free and open to the public.

This event is co-sponsored by the following units at the UW Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies: Center for Human Rights, African Studies, Center for Global Studies

www.fiuts.org

On April 23, from 6:30 – 9:00 pm the Value Sensitive Design Research Lab and FIUTS are presenting an evening of films related to Rwanda. 

The program will be:

Transitional Justice in Rwanda
A short film by Rwandan youth about transitional justice in Rwanda, followed by video clips from interviews with personnel from the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

Finding Hillywood
A one-hour feature documentary about the beginning of Rwanda's film industry, and a real life example of how art heals.

Discussion
A conversation with Leah Warshawski, Director of Finding Hillywood

Co-sponsored by:
African Studies Program
Center for Global Studies
Center for Human Rights
FIUTS
Information School
School of Law
Value Sensitive Design Research Lab

More info at: www.fiuts.org
 

 


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“Uzbek Folktales in Comparison to Brothers Grimm’s Folktales”

Ellison Center

Thursday April 24, 2014
12:30-1:30/1:40 pm
Denny Hall 123

Ilse Cirtautas, Department of Near Eastern Languages & Civilization, UW

Central-Inner Asian Studies Seminar

icirt@uw.edu

Uzbeks value their folktales. They include them in school books under chapter headings like “Folktales lead to Kindness.” Indeed, Uzbek folktales do not  depict old women as witches who entice children to enter their houses in order to kill and eat them (“Hänsel and Gretel”)as we read in  Grimm’s Fairy Tales. London: Routledge, 1959, p. 97. There are also other differences in style and motifs which will be discussed.

 

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Governor Sergio Fajardo of Antioquia, Colombia. “Antioquia, the Most Educated” and The Urban Transformation of Latin American Cities

Latin American Studies

Thursday April 24, 2014
7:00 pm
Kane Hall 120 | UW Seattle

krm@uw.edu

GOVERNOR SERGIO FAJARDO
Governor of Antioquia, Colombia
former Mayor of Medellin, Colombia

“Antioquia, the Most Educated” and The Urban Transformation of Latin American Cities

Under the leadership of Sergio Fajardo as mayor of Medellín, Colombia from 2004-2007, the city was transformed from a hub of violence into a model of education reform, successful public infrastructure and successful governance. Fajardo pioneered methods of community / citizen participation, inclusive education and budget transparency for the city and now, as Governor of the state of Antioquia, he works to build on the lessons of that experience at a larger scale. A cornerstone of this strategy to was to engage disenfranchised citizens and create a network of modern public libraries and parks where city services are made accessible to those who needed them most.

Coined “social urbanism,” his rethinking of social and community inclusion through public spaces is now being replicated throughout Latin America. Fajardo will discuss his approach to how architecture and good urbanism can transform cities and become models for ecological, economic and cultural sustainability.

 

Trained as a mathematician (PhD University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1984), Sergio Fajardo Valderrama worked in academia at the University of Los Andes in Bogotá. Campaigning as an independent, he won election as mayor of Medellín and served in that office from 2004 to 2007. His tenure was characterized by a number of ambitious public works projects that garnered international recognition. After this term ended, Fajardo worked as a political commentator for several Colombian news outlets and joined Antanas Mockus’ 2010 presidential campaign as the vice presidential candidate. Currently, he serves as the governor of Antioquia.

 


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Cántame una cantiga/Sing me a song’: Collecting Sephardic Ballads in Seattle, 1973

Jackson School Information

Jewish Studies Program

Thursday April 24, 2014
7:30PM
Town Hall Seattle: 1119 Eighth Avenue (at Seneca Street) Seattle, WA 98101

Prof. Rina Benmayor

Jewish Studies

Lauren Spokane: laurenjs@uw.edu

 “’Cántame una cantiga/Sing me a song’: Collecting Sephardic Ballads in Seattle, 1973” by Prof. Rina Benmayor.

Please visit our website for more details! StroumJewishStudies.org/events


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Being a Translator: My Journey to becoming a freelance translator

Career Services

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday April 25, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Savery 131

Joseph Boxman, graduate student Asian Languages & Literature

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and the department of Asian Languages and Literature

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

For nearly five years in Seattle, I have been a professional Japanese to English translator. This talk will follow my path from Japanese language study to translation work. I will speak about my experience as a freelance translator, including details about how I find projects, what the work is, and how it gets done. In addition to presenting information based on my own experience, I will provide resources for further research into the field of professional translation.

Joseph Boxman is a graduate student in the Asian Literature and Languages Department at the University of Washington. Born and raised in southern Indiana, Boxman studied Japanese at Earlham College, then studied abroad at Waseda University in Tokyo. Upon his return to Indiana, he completed his degree while working as a translator/interpreter at an automotive factory (TBK America). In 2010 Boxman moved to Seattle and transitioned to freelance translation while working at an izakaya.


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South Indian Classical Music Concert: Shashank Subramanyam

South Asia Center

Friday April 25, 2014
Time: 7:00 PM
Location: Seattle Art Museum’s Plestcheeff Auditorium, 1300 1st Ave, Seattle, WA 98101

Performer: Shashank Subramanyam

Sponsors: Upaya Social Ventures, Think.Act, India Association of Western Washington, Bainbridge Performing Arts, Impact Hub Seattle, World Affairs Council, Global Washington, The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Newspapers in Education

Contact: Upaya Social Ventures, info@upayasv.org

A bamboo flute prodigy who has been one of India’s most respected classical musicians for the past 25 years, the Grammy-nominated Maestro Shashank will bring his unique improvisational style to a variety of South Indian classics against the backdrop of the Seattle Art Museum. Shashank will be joined onstage by Mysore Srikanth on Violin and Patri Satish Kumar on Mridangam.

Tickets: $25 ($10 for students and children)

Tickets and more information


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An Evening with Shashank: Indian Classical Music Virtuoso

Jackson School Information

Friday April 25, 2014
7:00-11:00 PM
Seattle Art Museum's Plestcheeff Auditorium, 1300 1st Avenue Seattle, WA 98101

Grammy-nominated Indian musician Shashank Subramanyam, bamboo flute

Upaya Social Ventures

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-with-shashank-indian-classical-music-virtuoso-tickets-10085829989

Enjoy world class Indian musician Shashank Subramanyam performing in one of Seattle’s most iconic venues.

A bamboo flute prodigy who has been one of India’s most respected classical musicians for the past 25 years, the Grammy-nominated Maestro Shashank will bring his unique improvisational style to a variety of South Indian classics against the backdrop of the Seattle Art Museum. Shashank will be joined onstage by Mysore Srikanth on Violin and Patri Satish Kumar on Mridangam.

Doors and refreshments at 7 p.m., performance at 7:30 p.m. with light appetizers and drinks to follow the show.

Tickets: $25 general, $10 students

Parking: Event parking is available at the 3rd and Stewart Garage (255 Stewart St). Flat rate $6 for the entire evening (4pm-2am).


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Discretion and Reason in Iran's New Penal Code

Middle East Center

Friday April 25, 2014
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Smith Hall, Room 307

Arzoo Osanloo, Associate Professor, Law, Societies & Justice

Persian Circle, Near Eastern Languages & Civilization

neareast@uw.edu


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20th Annual Northwest Regional Conference for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies (REECAS NW)

Ellison Center

Saturday April 26, 2014
9:00 AM - 5:45 PM
Portland State University

Ellison Center

reecas@u.washington.edu

Conference program now online! 

Bridging Trends in Area Studies for the Next Generation


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Author and Journalist Sonora Jha to Speak at Fundraiser for India Non-Profit

South Asia Center

Sunday April 27, 2014
Time: 3:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Location: The Mercer Island Community and Event Center, 8236 SE 24th St, Mercer Island, WA 98040 RSVP by 4/20: ppiusa@ppi-usa.org

Presenter: Sonora Jha

Sponsor: People for Progress in India

Contact: Chitra Parpia (425) 825-0950, chitrazp@comcast.net

Sonora Jha, local author and associate professor of journalism at Seattle University, will speak at People for Progress in India's annual fundraiser. Jha's academic research and scholarship is widely published in top-tier journals. Her first novel, "Foreign," which addresses the issue of the untimely deaths of farmers in India, was published by Random House recently. Find out more at http://sonorajha.com/

People for Progress in India is a Seattle based non-profit organization that strives towards promoting sustainable growth among underprivileged communities in India. PPI funds and engages with numerous grass-roots organizations in India that execute innovative projects.

To RSVP for this event, email ppiusa@ppi-usa.org


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Tasveer Presents: Aaina South Asian Women's Focus Festival

South Asia Center

Friday April 25, 2014 to Sunday April 27, 2014
Times: vary
Location: Seattle Asian Art Museum

Presented by Tasveer

Sponsors: Tasveer, Gardner Center for Asian Arts and Ideas, Humanities Washington, Best in Class Education Center, Jaipur Avenue Chai, Studio Disha, Uravi

Contact: info@tasveer.org

Aaina 2014Tasveer, a local community organization promoting art and film from South Asia, presents Aaina 2014. Aaina: South Asian Women's Focus is a festival that celebrates the artistic and activist work of South Asian women through performance art, visual art, films, workshops and conversations aimed at highlighting issues critical to the empowerment of SA Women.

Aaina 2014 events include Yoni Ki Baat (inspired by Eve Ensler's Vagina Monologues), Youth Voices, film screenings, art receptions and more.

For tickets and more information, visit http://aaina.tasveer.org/2014/


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Yom Hashoah Commemoration with Lecture by Pro. Dan Chirot on his new book, Confronting Memories of World War II: European and Asian Legacies

Jewish Studies Program

Sunday April 27, 2014
2:30-4:30 pm
Kane Hall 220

Prof. Dan Chirot

Lauren Spokane


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A Reluctant Superpower: Prospects for China's Expanding Role in the Middle East

East Asia Center

Middle East Center

Monday April 28, 2014
3:30-5:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Dr. Kyle Haddad-Fonda

Middle East Center & East Asia Center

mecuw@uw.edu

Dr. Kyle Haddad-Fonda is the Director of the Strategic Initiatives at the Nicholas Sparks Foundation. He received his Ph.D. from Oxford University in 2013 with a dissertation titled :"Revolutionary Allies: Sino-Egyptian and Sino-Algerian Relations in the Bandung Period."


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Human Rights, Human Dignity, and Cosmopolitan Ideals.

Center for Human Rights

Tuesday April 29, 2014
4:00 pm
Communications 202 (Simpson Center Seminar Rroom), UW Seattle

Contact: Simpson Center - uwch@uw.edu

Human Rights, Human Dignity, and Cosmopolitan Ideals.

HI-NORM New Book Event. 4 pm on Tuesday April 29, 2014 in Simpson Center Seminar Room (CMU 202).

This is a celebration of the publication in April 2014 of a new collection of essays edited by Matthias Lutz-Bachmann (University of Frankfurt) Amos Nascimento (UW-Tacoma) by Ashgate. Four of the authors will be present to discuss their contributions: Professor Andreas Niederberger (University of Frankfurt); Professor Eduardo Mendieta (Stony Brook University); Amos Nascimento (UW-Tacoma) and Bill Talbott (UW-Seattle).

Co-sponsors: UW Tri-Campus interdisciplinary Research Cluster on Human Interactions and Normative Innovation (HI-NORM), the Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities and the UW Center for Human Rights.


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Workshop for Educators: Exploring Asia: Asian Cities – Growth and Change

East Asia Center

Ellison Center

East Asia Resource Center

Center for Global Studies

Joint Outreach

Southeast Asia Center

South Asia Center

Tuesday April 29, 2014
5:00 - 8:00 pm
The Vancouver Room, Seattle Times Building, 1000 Denny Way, Seattle, WA 98109

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Newspapers In Education

snodgras@uw.edu

The Asia Centers and the Center for Global Studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington are proud to present Exploring Asia: Asian Cities - Growth and Change, its 2014 Newspapers In Education Series and Workshop. The five-part series, in conjunction with The Seattle Times, includes articles on Vietnam, China, India, and Central Asia, in addition to an overview article. The workshop will include presentations by series authors as well as an introduction to the curriculum guide that pairs with the articles.

This workshop is one aspect of a collaborative project between the Newspapers In Education program of The Seattle Times and the University of Washington Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Asia and Global Studies outreach centers as well as the East Asia Resource Center. The project consists of a five-article series, a teaching guide, and this workshop for K-12 educators.

Designed with high school readers in mind, each article in the online newspaper series entitled Exploring Asia: Asian Cities - Growth and Change, focuses on cities of Asia. The teaching guide provides a lesson plan for each article that includes activities to do with students before, during, and after reading the featured article. Together, the articles and accompanying lessons take students on an exploration of contemporary urban issues in several Asian countries, asking students to look at the issues from multiple perspectives and investigate the complexities and challenges of Asia's rapidly growing cities.

The cost of registration for the workshop is $30.00, which includes three Washington State clock hours, dinner, and curriculum guide. To register for the workshop, please complete the online registration form at 
https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/snodgras/224702

To view curriculum and video from last year's workshop, go to http://depts.washington.edu/nie/curriculum.htm

For more information, please email the South Asia Center at snodgras@uw.edu.


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Yom HaShoah: Universal Perspectives on Holocaust Remembrance

Center for Human Rights

Wednesday April 30, 2014
12:30-1:20 pm. Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to gatespsl@uw.edu
Location: William H. Gates Hall | Room 119

Guest Speaker: Reut Cohen, New Israel Fund Civil Liberties Law Program Fellow Respondents: Rabbi Oren Hayon, Prof Stephen Rosenbaum

Event co-sponsored by UW CHR

gatespsl@uw.edu

As the Holocaust (Shoah) is observed throughout the world this week and the UW community welcomes jurist, memoirist and concentration camp survivor Thomas Buergenthal, it is a fitting time to consider the contemporary commemoration of state-sponsored murder by the Nazi regime. Lawyer/Activist Reut Cohen writes: “We Israelis grow up in the shadows of the Holocaust. It's always there and always very present. I don't think this is necessarily bad, but I recognize two possible educational messages that derive from this: the first is that ‘We must never let this happen to us [Jews/Israel] again and have to do everything in order to prevent it’ and the second is ‘We must never let this happen again to any other nation or people.’" Join us for a discussion about the public remembrance of genocidal events.


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May 2014
2014 Graduate School Public Lectures: Claire Jean Kim

Jackson School PhD Program

Southeast Asia Center

Thursday May 1, 2014
6:30 - 8 pm
Kane Hall 120

Claire Jean Kim, associate professor of Political Science and Asian American studies at the University of California, Irvine.

UW Graduate School UW Alumni Association, Comparative History of Ideas, Graduate Opportunities and Minority Achievement Program (GO-MAP), Latin American and Caribbean Studies - Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

uwalumni@uw.edu

In recent years, there have been a number of impassioned disputes over how immigrants of color, native-born minorities and Native people in the U.S. use animals in their cultural traditions. The struggle over San Francisco Chinatown’s live animal markets and the Makah whaling controversy in the Pacific Northwest are examples of cases where animal advocates charge these groups with cruelty and/or doing ecological harm, while group representatives push back with charges of racism and cultural imperialism.

In her lecture, Dangerous Crossings: Race, Species and Nature in a Multicultural Age, professor Claire Jean Kim will explore how to bring justice to both sides of competing moral and political claims, and examine what justice looks like in a multi-racial, multi-species world.

Claire Jean Kim is an associate professor of Political Science and Asian American studies at the University of California, Irvine. She received a B.A. in Government from Harvard College and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University. Learn more.

Free, but advance registration is required:
http://engage.washington.edu/site/Calendar?id=117561&view=Detail


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Prof. Claire Jean Kim, Dangerous Crossings: Race, Species and Nature in a Multicultural Age

Latin American Studies

Thursday May 1, 2014
6:30 - 8:00 pm
Kane Hall 120 | UW Seattle

Free, but advance registration is required.

Co-sponsors: UW Graduate School UW Alumni Association Comparative History of Ideas Graduate Opportunities and Minority Achievement Program (GO-MAP) Latin American and Caribbean Studies - Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Contact the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or uwalumni@uw.edu.

2014 Graduate School Public Lectures: Claire Jean Kim
 

In recent years, there have been a number of impassioned disputes over how immigrants of color, native-born minorities and Native people in the U.S. use animals in their cultural traditions. The struggle over San Francisco Chinatown’s live animal markets and the Makah whaling controversy in the Pacific Northwest are examples of cases where animal advocates charge these groups with cruelty and/or doing ecological harm, while group representatives push back with charges of racism and cultural imperialism.

In her lecture, Dangerous Crossings: Race, Species and Nature in a Multicultural Age, professor Claire Jean Kim will explore how to bring justice to both sides of competing moral and political claims, and examine what justice looks like in a multi-racial, multi-species world.

Claire Jean Kim is an associate professor of Political Science and Asian American studies at the University of California, Irvine. She received a B.A. in Government from Harvard College and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University. Learn more.

When: Thursday, May 1
6:30–8 p.m.
Where: Kane Hall, Room 120
UW Seattle
Cost: Free, but advance registration is required.
For more information, contact the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or uwalumni@uw.edu.

Sponsored by:
UW Graduate School
UW Alumni Association
Comparative History of Ideas
Graduate Opportunities and Minority Achievement Program (GO-MAP)
Latin American and Caribbean Studies - Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
 


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Roundtable with Ellis Goldberg: Egypt After the Arab Spring

Jackson School Information

Thursday May 1, 2014
9:00 - 9:30 p.m.
Town Hall Seattle 1119 Eighth Avenue (at Seneca Street)

Town Hall, University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies, and University Book Store, as part of the Civics series. Series supported by The Boeing Company, the RealNetworks Foundation, and the True-Brown Foundation. Series media sponsorship provided by The Stranger and KUOW.

(206) 652-4255 or info@townhallseattle.org

 Egypt recently sentenced 528 supporters of The Muslim Brotherhood to death. After listening to Shadi Hamid’s 7:30 pm talk on Illiberal Islamist Politics, Ellis Goldberg will focus the conversation on current political and religious trends in Egypt. Share your thoughts about the event, learn more about the Middle East after the Arab Spring, and discuss the future of Islamic influence in the region. Goldberg is Chair of the Middle East Center at the University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies.

Free, no ticket required.

 


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“The Ahiska (Meshkhetian) Turks as Immigrants in Turkey and in the US"

Ellison Center

Thursday May 1, 2014
12:30-1:30/1:40 pm
Denny Hall 123

Betul Balbay, Visiting Ph.D. Student, University of Washington

Central-Inner Asian Studies Seminar

icirt@uw.edu

The paper will address issues of migration in Central Asia since independence (1991). Borders have been opened and new conditions for migratory processes have been created. The Central Asian states were faced with different external and internal , voluntary and forced migratory waves,  which  have had both positive and negative aspects. The geopolitical dynamics of  great power neighbors -China and Russia – and closeness to conflict zones, like Afghanistan, could become  a challenge to Kazakhstan as well as to the whole region’s status-quo.


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Illiberal Islamist Politics

Jackson School Information

Thursday May 1, 2014
7:30 - 8:45 p.m.
Downstairs at Town Hall; enter on Seneca St.

Shadi Hamid

Presented by: Town Hall, University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies, and University Book Store, as part of the Civics series. Series supported by The Boeing Company, the RealNetworks Foundation, and the True-Brown Foundation. Series media sponsorship provided by The Stranger and KUOW.

(206) 652-4255 or info@townhallseattle.org

Shadi Hamid: Illiberal Islamist Politics

The Muslim Brotherhood has been labeled a terrorist organization by Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Since 2011’s Arab Spring, Islamist groups have been steadily gaining power in what author Shadi Hamid calls the “new Middle East.” Based on hundreds of regional interviews with activists, leaders, and others, Temptations of Power: Islamists and Illiberal Democracy in a New Middle East traces the roots of Islamic authority and its influence in the area. According to Hamid, these groups rose out of necessity for democratization, but their leadership was far from the traditional, liberal democracies of Western nations. Temptations of Power is a look at how these groups came to power, the effect they’re having on the people, and what their future might hold. Hamid is a Brookings Institute fellow with the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World, Saban Center for Middle East Policy.

 

Presented by: Town Hall, University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies, and University Book Store, as part of the Civics series. Series supported by The Boeing Company, the RealNetworks Foundation, and the True-Brown Foundation. Series media sponsorship provided by The Stranger and KUOW.
Tickets: $5.
Town Hall Member Benefits: Priority seating, discounted onsite book sales.
Doors open: 6:30 p.m.
Learn more: About the author.


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LACS Undergraduate Essay Competition: Due May 1st

Latin American Studies

Thursday May 1, 2014


lasuw@uw.edu

The Latin American and Caribbean Studies program is inviting submissions by graduating seniors to its Annual UW-LACS Undergraduate Essay Competition for current or recent essays (written during 2013-2014 school year). The winning essay writer will receive a special prize and be recognized at the Jackson School graduation. In addition, the winning essay will also be featured on our website.

  • Submissions must be from a graduating LACS senior (majors or minors are eligible).
  • Include your full name, home department, email and phone number in the submission.
  • The subject of the essay should fall within the field of Latin American and Caribbean Studies and may come from courses in any department (for example, CHID, Anthropology, History, etc.). Essays may be of any length.
  • Contest winner(s) will be asked to submit an image and short bio.


Please submit your essay to lasuw@uw.edu by MAY 1st with the subject line: Essay Competition - 2014, your last name.

Essays should be attached to your email as a Word or PDF document.

We look forward to your submissions!


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Impressions of Iran

Middle East Center

Thursday May 1, 2014
2:30 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Steve Horowitz, ESL Director, Central Washington University

Persian Circle, Near East Languages & Civilization; Middle East Center

neareast@uw.edu


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American Romanian Cultural Society's book club meeting - on Vladimir Bartol's ALAMUT, with special guest Translator, Michael Biggins

Ellison Center

Friday May 2, 2014
6:30 pm
TBD

Otilia Baraboi otiliab@u.washington.edu

"Alamut" explores the intertwining paths of politics and religious devotion, drawing on the true story of a 11th century Persian sect of assassins. Originally written in 1938, Bartol's novel was first read as an allegory of European fascism. During the 1990's and the "Balkan Wars", it grew to symbolize the small nations' fight for independence and following September 11 2001, thanks to the first-ever translation in English by Michael Biggins, the novel has been interpreted as a valuable insight on world terrorism.


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Post-Fascist Political Culture: Japan after World War II

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday May 2, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Allen Library Auditorium

Laura Hein, Northwestern University

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and the Journal of Japanese Studies

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

Much excellent recent scholarship examines postwar Japan in its post-colonial and Cold War contexts but the context that most riveted Japanese themselves has faded from view: the aftermath of fascism, or what I call “post-fascism.” How do these new concepts change the way we think about postwar Japan? This talk focuses on progressive education experiments at the university level in postwar Japan.

Laura E. Hein (PhD Wisconsin, 1986) is a professor of Japanese history at Northwestern University. She specializes in the history of Japan in the 20th century, its international relations, and the effects of WWII and the Cold War. Her work focuses on debates over economic policy and the implications of various economic theories in postwar Japan. She also has a strong interest in problems of remembrance and public memory. Her books include Imagination Without Borders: Visual Artist Tomiyama Taeko and Social Responsibility, co-edited with Rebecca Jennison, CJS, (Univ. of Michigan Press, 2010) and Reasonable Men, Powerful Words: Political Culture and Expertise in 20th Century Japan (Univ. of California Press and WWIC Press, 2004, Japanese ed. Iwanami, 2007.) She edits the Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus, an on-line publication read by people in 205 countries who access 120-150,000 articles per month.


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Jewish Studies Graduate Fellows Symposium

Jackson School Information

Jewish Studies Program

Friday May 2, 2014
9:30AM - 1:30PM
HUB 214

Jewish Studies

Lauren Spokane: laurenjs@uw.edu

Jewish Studies Graduate Fellows Symposium

Register online at: http://graduatefellowssymposium.eventbrite.com


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Asian Languages and Literature Colloquium

Ellison Center

Saturday May 3, 2014
9:00am-4:00pm
Savery 408 & 409, University of Washington

asianllcolloquium@gmail.com

 


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2014 Student Colloquium Department of Asian Languages and Literature

Jackson School PhD Program

Southeast Asia Center

Saturday May 3, 2014
9 am - 4 pm
UW, Savery 408 & 409

Department of Asian Languages and Literature

asianllcolloquium@gmail.com

 The organizers of this year’s departmental colloquium invite students (graduates and undergraduates) to submit proposals/abstracts to present on May 3rd at the University of Washington.

Although we are a department of “languages and literature”, we invite all applicants regardless of discipline to submit proposals within the general area of “Asian Studies”. All topics and issues are welcome from all parts of Asia (South, East, Southeast, Central, etc.).

We are hoping to get a good mix of presenters this year from many departments here at the University of Washington and from our fellow scholars from the region. This is a great opportunity for students to gain experience in presenting formal academic papers in a smaller, informal atmosphere. Share your ideas and learn what your fellow Asian studies scholars are up to.


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The Beggar’s Opera

Ellison Center

Wednesday April 23, 2014 to Sunday May 4, 2014
7:30 pm
101 Hutchinson Hall, UW Campus

Katrina Ernst: 206.685.0600

On April 25, the School of Drama opens its production of Václav Havel’s The Beggar’s Opera. Tony-nominated director Wilson Milam leads a large cast of BA student-actors into Havel’s farcical underworld to tell the story of a satirical society where adversaries lie, deceit is commonplace, and shifting alliances come as second nature. Nearly 40 years after its first performance, Havel’s The Beggar’s Opera remains a potent commentary on contemporary society.

Running from April 23 through May 9 at the Jones Playhouse, we hope you’ll join us – and invite your colleagues and students – for a show. Doctoral candidate Susan Fink will lead a post-show discussion on Thursday, May 1. It’s our goal at the School of Drama to engage the greater UW community in important conversations through theatre. We hope to see you there!


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Václav Havel's The Beggar's Opera

Ellison Center

Wednesday April 23, 2014 to Sunday May 4, 2014
Wednesday-Saturday at 7:30pm, Sundays at 2pm
Floyd and Delores Jones Playhouse

University of Washington School of Drama

The University of Washington's School of Drama will be staging Václav Havel's The Beggar's Opera from April 23 - May 4 at the Floyd and Delores Jones Playhouse. For his take on The Beggar's Opera,Havel borrowed characters and plot elements from the iconic 18th century The Beggar's Opera and the more recent Three Penny Opera to create an entirely new commentary on 20th century society.

 

A post-show talk will be held on Thursday, May 1.

Learn more & buy tickets


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UW CHR 5th Anniversary Celebration

Center for Human Rights

Monday May 5, 2014
(Updated start time) 4:30 - 5:30 pm, lecture with Prof. Thomas Buergenthal in William H. Gates Hall, Room 138.
Followed by a reception at (5:30 pm) next door at the Burke Museum, featuring student human rights work

Please RSVP to gatespsl@uw.edu

uwchr@uw.edu

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO

UW Center for Human Rights' 5th Anniversary Celebration

with special guest

Professor Thomas Buergenthal, esteemed jurist and champion of human rights.

Presented by the School of Law’s Gates Public Service Law Speaker Series and the UW Center for Human Rights
In partnership with the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Hillel and Jewish Studies

join us on

Monday, May 5, 2014
4:30 p.m. (updated time) Lecture, William H. Gates Hall, Room 138
5:30 p.m. Reception program featuring Center for Human Rights and Students, Burke Museum, Main Lobby
(If you cannot make it to the lecture, please join us for the reception!)
to celebrate

Five years of progress, towards justice and advancing global respect for human rights

This event is free and open to the public.

Please RSVP to gatespsl@uw.edu

Thomas Buergenthal, currently Lobingier Professor of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence at GWU, spent the first 11 years of his life in various German camps and is one of the youngest survivors of the Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen concentration camps. Considered one of the world’s leading international human rights experts, Professor Buergenthal has served as a Judge and President of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights as well as President of the Administrative Tribunal of the Inter-American Development Bank. He was a member of the UN Human Rights Committee and the UN Truth Commission for El Salvador. He is a member of the Ethics Commission of the International Olympic Committee and the honorary president of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights in San José, Costa Rica.
 


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Sing Modern Choson: "Jazz Song" in the 1930s

East Asia Center

East Asia Resource Center

Jackson School Information

Korea Studies Program

Tuesday May 6, 2014
3:30-5:00PM
Allen Auditorium, Allen Library

Eujeong Zhang

Center for Korea Studies (uwcks@uw.edu)

 


Eujeong Zhang
Sing Modern Chosǒn: Korean "Jazz Song" in the 1930s

 

Allen Auditorium, Allen Library
Tuesday, May 6 @ 3:30PM

 


 

 


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Annual D.C. Conference: The Future Direction of International Affairs Education and Foreign Language Study in the United States

Canadian Studies Center

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

Master of Arts in Applied International Studies

Jackson School PhD Program

Wednesday May 7, 2014
8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (Directions.) One Woodrow Wilson Plaza – 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Washington, D.C.

Keynote: Robert Gallucci, The MacArthur Foundation; other international-education and language-study experts

Jackson School of International Studies, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, the Center for Global Studies, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

uwieforum@gmail.com

Robert GallucciPlease join us at the Jackson School fifth annual forum in Washington, D.C., for an insightful discussion as three panels of academic, industry and government experts examine current developments in international affairs education and foreign language study. Topics include area studies in a globalized world, future direction of funding, and leveraging technology to teach international education.

Due to heightened security, please allow extra time to enter the building.
A photo I.D. is required for entry.

Join us for all or part of the forum.
Cost: Free (registration required)

See the full agenda and register >>

 


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Energy Security in new European Union member states

Ellison Center

Wednesday May 7, 2014
7:00-9:00pm
University of Washington, Savery Hall Room 264

Agnia Grigas

Agnia Grigas (PhD, University of Oxford) is Fellow at the McKinnon Center for Global Affairs, Occidental College.  She is author of The Politics of Energy and Memory between the Baltic States and Russia (Ashgate, 2013). Her numerous recent publications include studies for the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House), Oxford Institute of Energy Studies, and Notre Europe Jacques Delors Institute. She is a frequent media contributor (CNN, Forbes, Bloomberg, BBC, CSM, Al-Jazeera, openDemocracy, LA Business Journal) and speaks regularly at policy and business conferences. Currently residing in Los Angeles, Grigas is an active member of the Pacific Council on International Policy, where she is a frequent speaker on Russia and Eastern Europe.


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7th Annual DC Alumni Reception

Alumni Relations

Jackson School Information

Wednesday May 7, 2014
5:30pm
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

The Henry M. Jackson Foundation

http://engage.washington.edu/site/Calendar?id=117261&view=Detail

Join Director Reşat Kasaba, Professor Don Hellmann, and other faculty of the
Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies for a time of fellowship, hors d’oeuvres, and beverages at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Please RSVP here: http://engage.washington.edu/site/Calendar?id=117261&view=Detail


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Pakistani Film Screening and Q&A with Director - Chuppan Chupai (Hide and Seek)

South Asia Center

Thursday May 8, 2014
Time: 6:00 PM
Location: Thomson 101

Director: Saad Khan

Sponsor: South Asia Center

Contact: Keith Snodgrass, snodgras@uw.edu

Chuppan ChupaiChuppan Chupai (Hide and Seek) is an award-winning 2013 human rights documentary about the queer community in Pakistan. The film shows the secret, yet open lives of a group of Pakistani sexual minorities, raising questions about transgender activism, religion, underground gay life, social acceptance and collective familial customs of transgenders in urban Pakistan. The film follows the lives of four LGBT Pakistanis: activist Neeli, flighty but “famous” Kami, shy Waseem, and Jenny, a transgender woman who struggles with her transition. All live under the specter of Pakistan’s sharia laws forbidding homosexuality. Throughout the film, their lives in the urban centers of Lahore and Rawalpindi are shown to be alternately joyous and painful—symptomatic of life around the world.

Language: Urdu, Punjabi (English subtitles)
Duration: 68 minutes + Q&A
Q&A with director Saad Khan after the screening. Watch clips of the film here and here.


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Visualizing War, Visualizing Fascism: Film and Photography in Germany and Japan

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Thursday May 8, 2014
3:30 - 6:00 PM
Communications Bldg. 120

Julia Adeney Thomas and Geoff Eley

Co-Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program, Simpson Center for Humanities and Dept of History

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

"The State of Unexception: Japan's War without Pictures" 

Bringing critical theory to bear on questions of power in modern societies, Julia Adeney Thomas investigates concepts of nature in Japanese political ideology, the impact of environmental history on historiography, and photography as a political practice. Her book, Reconfiguring Modernity, received the John K. Fairbank Prize from the American Historical Association in 2002 and her essay on wartime memory in Japan, "Photography, National Identity, and the 'Cataract of Times:' Wartime Images and the Case of Japan" in the American Historical Review received the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians' Best Article of the Year Award in 1999.

Before joining the faculty at Notre Dame, Julia Adeney Thomas taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Wisconsin, where she received tenure in 2001. She has also been a visiting scholar at the Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte in Berlin, the Universität Heidelberg, and the University of Michigan as well as a member of the University of Wisconsin Humanities Institute and of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.

   "Questioning the Fascist Spectacle"

Geoff Eley is the Karl Pohrt Distinguished University Professor of Contemporary History at Michigan. He studied history at the Balliol College of Oxford University and received his PhD from the University of Sussex in 1974. His book is Forging Democracy: The History of the Left in Europe, 1850-2000 has been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, Serbian, Korean, Turkish and Greek. His most recentl book is a collection of essays on fascism called Nazism as Fascism: Violence, Ideology, and the Ground of Consent in Germany, 1930-1945 (Routledge Press 2013.)


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“Water and Energy Problems in Central Asia”

Ellison Center

Friday May 9, 2014
12:30-1:30/1:40 pm
Denny Hall 123

Kamit Savay, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Institute of Social Development and Business, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, now living in Seattle

Central-Inner Asian Studies Seminar

icirt@uw.edu

The problems are grave: melting of glaciers due to climate change; shortages  of clean fresh water and desertification of land in countries  situated at the lower reaches of cross-border rivers (Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan).  Every country of Central Asia looks at water issues separately according to its own interest and does not consider problems of  its neighbors. The shortage in financial resources allocated to research of water issues is critical. A Central Asian Water Institute/University needs to be created.

(Please note: the above presentation had been scheduled for Winter Quarter 2013, but had to be cancelled due to a time conflict).


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Professor Charles Walker, "The Tupac Amaru Rebellion"

Latin American Studies

Monday May 12, 2014
Time: 4:30 pm
Location: Thomson 101, UW Seattle.

Contact: lasuw@uw.edu / 206-685-3435

Please SAVE THE DATE and join us for a special presentation with Prof. Charles Walker (History, University of California, Davis) author of The Tupac Amaru Rebellion.

About the book: Tupac Amaru was a descendant and namesake of the Inca ruler and, in the early 1780’s, led a massive indigenous rebellion that stormed through Peru, Bolivia, parts of Chile and into Argentina. It was the largest rebellion in the history of Spain’s American empire – a conflict greater in territory and costlier in lives than the contemporaneous American Revolution. No other figure in Latin American history, not even Che Guevara or Bolivar, is as associated with rebellion and revolution as Tupac Amaru; guerilla movements rallied under his name (including the group that was responsible for the Japanese embassy hostage crisis in Peru, in 1996 – fictionalized in Ann Patchett’s Bel Canto); countless political groups claimed his legacy; writers and artists spun his story (the rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur became his namesake).

Charles Walker is a professor of Latin American history at UC Davis and Director of the Hemispheric Institute. Harvard University Press released his "The Tupac Amaru Rebellion" in March 2014. In addition, he has translated a marvelous book of Peruvian History, In Search of an Inca, by Alberto Flores Galindo, in collaboration with Carlos Aguirre and Willie Hiatt. It was published by Cambridge University Press in October 2010. See also his Shaky Colonialism: The 1746 Earthquake-Tsunami in Lima, Peru and its Long Aftermath and Shaky Colonialism: Cuzco and the Creation of Republican Peru, 1780-1840 (Duke University Press), both also available in Spanish. His Peruvian books include Diálogos con el Perú and several edited volumes. More on his blog, http://charlesfwalker.com/

 


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SAVE THE DATE: Robert Pekkanen

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Tuesday May 13, 2014
3:30 - 5:30 PM
William H. Gates Hall, Room 447

Robert Pekkanen, University of Washington

Sponsored by the Asian Law Center, University of Washington

Please RSVP to asianlaw@uw.edu

Robert Pekkanen teaches an introductory class on contemporary Japan and graduate and undergraduate courses on Japanese civil society, politics and political parties.

He has published articles on Japanese politics in "The American Political Science Review", "The British Journal of Political Science", "Comparative Political Studies", and other journals. His first book, Japan's Dual Civil Society: Members without Advocates (Stanford University Press, 2006), won the Ohira Prize in 2008 and an award from the Japanese Nonprofit Research Association (JANPORA) in 2007. The Japan Times also featured it as one of the "Best Asia Books" of 2006. A Japanese translation appeared in 2008. His second book (coauthored with Ellis S. Krauss) The Rise and Fall of Japan's LDP: Political Party Organizations as Historical Institutions (Cornell, 2010) investigates the LDP - arguably the most successful political party in any democracy in the 20th Century. R. Pekkanen also produced a coauthored book in Japanese Bokutakusha (2009) on Japan's Neighborhood Associations and Local Governance, and co-edited a volume from Routledge on Local Organizations and Urban Goverence in East and Southeast Asia (with lead editor Benjamin Read).

For more information, please see the Asian Law Center webpage.


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Andrew L. Markus Memorial Lecture - Transplanting Buddhism on the Korean Peninsula

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Korea Studies Program

Tuesday May 13, 2014
7:30 p.m.
Walker-Ames Room (Kane 225)

Robert Buswell, Professor of Buddhist Studies at UCLA

Asian Languages & Literature

asianll@uw.edu

Robert E. Buswell Jr., Distinguished Professor of Buddhist Studies in the UCLA Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, is the Irving and Jean Stone Chair in Humanities at UCLA, and the founding director of the university’s Center for Buddhist Studies and Center for Korean Studies. From 2009-2011, he served concurrently as founding director of the Dongguk Institute for Buddhist Studies Research (Pulgyo Haksurwon) at Dongguk University in Seoul, Korea. Buswell has published fifteen books and some forty articles on various aspects of the Chinese, Korean, and Indian traditions of Buddhism, as well as on Korean religions more broadly.

This lectureship was established in memory of Andrew L. Markus, Associate Professor of Japanese Literature at the University of Washington from 1986-1995. Established through the generosity of family and friends, this annual lecture honors Professor Markus's contribution to the study of Asian languages and literatures.

The lecture series brings to the University of Washington distinguished scholars in the field of Asian Languages and Literature. The annual lecture is considered the premiere public event sponsored by the department and is the highest honor that the department can bestow on a scholar in the field.

The Markus lecture is free and open to the public. Parking is available.

 


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40th Anniversary Gala

Jackson School Information

Jewish Studies Program

Tuesday May 13, 2014
6:00PM - 9:00PM
TBD

Jewish Studies

Lauren Spokane: laurenjs@uw.edu

 40th Anniversary Gala


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The Rise of the Far Right in Europe

Alumni Relations

European Union Center of Excellence

Hellenic Studies

Jackson School Information

Jewish Studies Program

Comparative Religion

Thursday May 15, 2014
6 pm
HUB room 160

Suzanne Daley, NYT Reporter

Hellenic Studies, The Jackson School of International Studies

Taso Lagos


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“Recent Publications on Central/Inner Asia”: Zentralasien-Analysen (Central Asian Analyses), published monthly by the Forschungsstelle Osteuropa an der Universität Bremen, Germany

Ellison Center

Thursday May 15, 2014
12:30-1:30/1:40 pm
Denny Hall 123

Ilse Cirtautas, Department of Near Eastern Languages & Civilization, UW

Central-Inner Asian Studies Seminar

icirt@uw.edu

Three of the latest issues will be discussed. Topics: “Turkish Schools in Central Asia;” “Rocket Center, Baikonur, Kazakhstan;” “Preservation of Heritage Buildings in Uzbekistan.”


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Hot Presses, Cold War: Furniture Manufacturing and Geopolitics in Occupation Era Japan

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Thursday May 15, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Savery Hall 138

Sarah Teasley, Royal College of Art, London

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Seattle Art Museum Gardner Center for Asian Art and Ideas

For information contact japan@uw.edu

This talk explores the impact of the Allied Occupation of Japan (1945-52) on Japan's furniture manufacturing industry, looking at interactions of different magnitudes ranging from the broader economic and social policies and conditions such as materials shortages to commissioning processes that affected several hundred firms and specific interpersonal exchanges between Occupation members and key industry figures. Drawing on public, personal and corporate archival work in Japan and the US as well as on oral history and object analysis, the talk argues for a multi-level approach to understanding historical change, and suggests that close attention to seemingly obscure industries can be surprisingly fruitful.

Dr. Sarah Teasley (PhD, University of Tokyo) is Reader in Design History and Theory in the School of Humanities, Royal College of Art, London. Her research into the history of product and furniture design and manufacturing in modern and contemporary Japan brings historical analysis to bear on contemporary issues in design, society and technology today. Her current project explores the relationship between furniture manufacturing and public policy in Japan c. 1890-1970, with attention to areas including technical education, materials and technology R&D, industrial research institutes and class in manufacturing culture. Her publications include the books Global Design History (Routledge, 2011) and Designing Modern Japan (Reaktion, forthcoming 2014) as well as articles in journals including Japanstudien, The Journal of Design History and Design Issues. She is Associate Editor of the journal Design and Culture.


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Suzanne Daley, NY Times: "The Rise of the Far Right in Europe"

Center for West European Studies

European Union Center of Excellence

Hellenic Studies

Jackson School Information

Thursday May 15, 2014
6-7 p.m.
HUB Lyceum

Suzanne Daley, New York Times foreign correspondent

Hellenic Studies Program and the Jackson School of International Studies

jasonh@uw.edu

Suzanne Daley became a foreign correspondent covering Europe for The New York Times in March 2010.

Previously, Ms. Daley had been the national editor of The Times, taking over just weeks
after Hurricane Katrina flattened New Orleans in 2005. During her tenure, the national
desk covered events ranging from the massacre at Virginia Tech to the collapse of the
Minneapolis bridge, and won a Pulitzer for a series, “The DNA Age,” which chronicled how
the study of genetics was changing life for average Americans.

Ms. Daley’s previous assignments at The Times include education editor, chief of the Paris
bureau, chief of the Johannesburg bureau and deputy metropolitan editor.


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Recent Publication in/on Kazakhstan: Muratbek Imangazinov.Iliyas Jansügirov (1894-1938). Almaty: Qazaq universiteti, 2004

Ellison Center

Friday May 16, 2014
12:30-1:30/1:40 pm
Denny Hall 123

Ilse Cirtautas, Department of Near Eastern Languages & Civilization, UW

Central-Inner Asian Studies Seminar

icirt@uw.edu

The author discusses the life and work of one of the many Kazakh poets and writers who were killed under Stalin’s orders in 1937/1938. Ilyas Jansügirov’s mother passed away early and the young Iliyas grew  up under the guidance of a remarkable father who even as a shoemaker was an educated man, played the dombira, the national instrument of the Kazakhs, and sang Kazakh songs.  Jansügirov first started to compose poems/songs and later  also wrote prose (novels, plays).


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2014 Graduate Research Workshop on the European Union

Center for West European Studies

European Union Center of Excellence

Thursday May 15, 2014 to Friday May 16, 2014
8:00am-5:00pm
University of Colorado Boulder

Professors James Caporaso (University of Washington), Joseph Jupille (University of Colorado), Cliff Carrubba (Emory University)

European Union Center of Excellence of Seattle

ceuce@colorado.edu

A forum for US-based graduate students at the dissertation level to present research focused on the EU and/or Transatlantic Relations to faculty and peers and improve EU research in the U.S. with an eye toward publication of research results. Graduate students selected to participate will be expected to give a formal presentation of their research proposal. Costs of a round trip economy airfare from participants’ home cities to Denver, along with two nights’ hotel stay and most meals will be covered. Applications will be accepted through April 2nd, 2014, and acceptances will be notified by April 9, 2014.
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After Assimilating Seoul: Ch’anggyong Garden and the Post-Colonial Remaking of Seoul’s Public Spaces

East Asia Center

East Asia Resource Center

Jackson School Information

Korea Studies Program

Friday May 16, 2014
3:30-5:00PM
Thomson Hall 317

Todd Henry, UC San Diego

Center for Korea Studies (uwcks@uw.edu)

 


Todd A. Henry
After Assimilating Seoul: Ch’anggyŏng Garden and the Post-Colonial Remaking of Seoul's Public Spaces

 

Thomson Hall 317
Friday, May 16 @ 3:30PM

 


 

 

 


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2014 K-12 Teachers' Conference in Korean Studies

Korea Studies Program

Joint Outreach

Saturday May 17, 2014
9:00 AM – 3:30 PM
Thomson Hall, Room 101

Center for Korea Studies (uwcks@uw.edu)

SPRING 2014 TEACHERS’ CONFERENCE IN KOREAN STUDIES

FOR K-12 WASHINGTON STATE TEACHERS

 

The Center for Korea Studies invites K-12 Washington State teachers and their colleagues to a special one-day workshop event at the University of Washington. Six clock hours available!


Time: Saturday, May 17, 9:00 AM – 3:30 PM

Location: University of Washington at Seattle, Thomson Hall, Room 101

Registration: To register for the event, you must complete the registration form following the link below and send your payment of $20 to the Center for Korea Studies by May 12th (postmark deadline). If you choose to pay on the day of the event, the registration fee is $30.

Payment may be mailed by check (made out to 'University of Washington') to:

Center for Korea Studies
University of Washington
Campus Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195

 

 

Click Here to Register Online


 

Why Attend?

  • Door prizes! Outstanding and carefully selected books for you and your students
  • Outstanding free reference books that will allow for inclusion of resources on Asia
  • Free teaching materials! K-12 standards-based lessons, PowerPoint lectures, and art projects
  • Delicious Korean lunch!
  • Six clock hours!
     

 

Lecture Lineup: TBA

 

For reference, here are the presenters from last year's event

 

“North Korea, Succession and Beyond”

University of Washington Center for Korea Studies Director, Clark W. Sorensen will discuss recent events and social changes in North Korea, and their possible implications for regional stability in the future.


"Education and the Arts: Korean Literature, Film, and Sijo"

Mark Peterson, Associate Professor and Department of Asian & Near Eastern Language, Brigham Young University


“ 'Kor'iculum- Korea as Part of What We Teach”

Kevin Richins, President of the Washington State Council for the Social Studies (WSCSS), teaches AP World History, Asian History, World Geography, and Economics in Lynden High School in Lynden Washington. He will introduce several fully developed lessons that can be used to illustrate broader concepts in world history and geography.

 

  

For questions or additional information, please contact the UW Center for Korea Studies at uwcks@uw.edu or 206-543-4873.

 

 

 


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SAVE THE DATE: Dr. Tony Payan, University of Texas at El Paso

Latin American Studies

Monday May 19, 2014
Time: 4:30 pm
Location: Thomson 101, UW Seattle.

lasuw@ uw.edu | 206.685.3435

Dr. Tony Payan of the University of Texas at El Paso will be coming to UW for a presentation on May 13th. Please save the date and join us. 

More information about the talk will be available at a later date.

Dr. Payan is dedicated to serving students and the community of both El Paso and Ciudad Juarez. His service to the border community includes various activities from media political analysis to managing political campaigns to contributing to non-profit organizations to speaking in different groups to serving in the Board of Directors of the Regional Mobility Authority. His research and writing is about the United States-Mexico border in order to produce concrete narratives that can help enlighten our understanding of the milieu in which we live and move and have our being. To learn more about Dr. Payan and his current activities, visit his website.

Presented as part of B/ordering Violence: Boundaries, Gender, Indigeneity in the Americas, a John E. Sawyer Seminar in Comparative Cultures generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-sponsored by the Latin American & Caribbean Studies program, the Jackson School of International Studies, the Simpson Center for the Humanities, and the Institute for the Study of Ethnicity, Race, & Sexuality (WISER).


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Historic City Encounters Modern Urbanism: Mid-20th Century Transformation of Istanbul

Center for West European Studies

European Union Center of Excellence

Middle East Center

Tuesday May 20, 2014
4:30 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 101

Professor Sibel Bozdogan

Middle East Center, EU Center for Excellence, & Center for West European Studies, Jackson School of International Studies

mecuw@uw.edu, cwes@uw.edu

Sibel Bozdogan, Harvard Graduate School of Design, specializes in trans-national histories of modern architecture/urbanism of the 19th and 20th centuries and the politics of modern architecture. Her many publications include: Turkey: Modern Architectures of the World (2012); Modernism and National Building: Turkish Architectural Culture in the Early Republic (2001); and Rethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey, co-authored with Resat Kasaba (1997).

This presentation is part of the "Turkey, the EU and the West: A Changing Landscape" series. See May 21 and May 22 for more lectures in the series.


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European Capital of Culture or Dubai on the Bosporus? Neo-Liberal Urbanism since 2002

Center for West European Studies

European Union Center of Excellence

Middle East Center

Wednesday May 21, 2014
4:30 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 101

Professor Sibel Bozdogan

Middle East Center, EU Center for Excellence, & Center for West European Studies, Jackson School of International Studies

mecuw@uw.edu, cwes@uw.edu

Sibel Bozdogan, Harvard Graduate School of Design, specializes in trans-national histories of modern architecture/urbanism of the 19th and 20th centuries; and the politics of modern architecture: theories of modernity, identity, nationalism and globalization. Her many publications include: Turkey: Modern Architectures of the World (2012), Modernism and Nation Building: Turkish Architectural Culture in the Early Republic (2001); and Rethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey, with Resat Kasaba (1997). 

This presentation is part of the series: "Turkey, the EU, and the West: A Changing Landscape. See May 20 and May 22 for more presentations in the series.

 

 


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Getting your Foot in the Door and Progressing your Career in a Japanese (and other Asian Languages) Major

Career Services

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Wednesday May 21, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Smith Hall 105

Andrew Kim, Microsoft

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and the Department of Asian Languages and Literature

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

How do I further my skills in Japanese (and other Asian languages)? Are programs like JET helpful to my career? What kind of options are available and how do I continually progress?

Andrew Kim will address these concerns and share advice on transitioning from student to full-time employment. Topics to include how you can develop your language skills to get to that professional level, the value of teaching programs like JET, the process of job hunting and what companies look for in bilingual candidates, advancing your career, etc. Be sure to prepare questions and network with Andrew for possible referrals.

Andrew earned his B.A. in Japanese Linguistics from the University of Washington and spent three years as an assistant language teacher in the JET Program (placed in Miyoshi-shi, Tokushima-ken, Japan). Returning to Seattle he got into the IT industry with his Japanese language skills. He currently has nine years of combined experience in the education and IT sectors, and is currently a service manager for email at Microsoft.


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Fifty Years of EU-Turkish Relations in Turbulent Times: Where to Go from Here?

Center for West European Studies

European Union Center of Excellence

Middle East Center

Thursday May 22, 2014
7:00 p.m.
Kane Hall, Room 210

Dr. Kemal Kirisci

Middle East Center, EU Center for Excellence, & Center for West European Studies, Jackson School of International Studies

mecuw@uw.edu, cwes@uw.edu

Presenter: Dr. Kemal Kirisici, TUSIAD Senior Fellow, Brookings Institute. The presentation will be followed by a round table discussion with Professor Sibel Bozdogan, Harvard University; and Professor Resat Kasaba, Director, Jackson School of International Studies.

Part of the "Turkey, the EU, and the West: A Changing Landscape" series.  See May 20 and May 21 for lectures by Sibel Bozdogan. 


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Recent Publication on/in Kyrgyzstan: Roza Aytmatova. Tarïxtïn aktay baraktarï. Menin eskerüülörüm (White Pages of History. What I Remember). Bishkek: Biyiktik, 2007

Ellison Center

Thursday May 22, 2014
12:30-1:30/1:40 pm
Denny Hall 123

Ilse Cirtautas, Department of Near Eastern Languages & Civilization, UW

Central-Inner Asian Studies Seminar

icirt@uw.edu

Roza Aytmatova is the sister of Chingiz Aytmatov (1928-2008), the world-renown Kyrgyz writer. In her memoirs she concentrates on the fate of her father who was shot on Stalin’s order in 1938, together with 137 other Kyrgyz intellectuals. Their burial place was only revealed in August 1991. In describing her father’s life Roza Aytmatov also gives a detailed description of her own life during the Soviet years, growing up as the daughter of an “enemy of the people.”


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Turkey and the European Union

Center for West European Studies

European Union Center of Excellence

Tuesday May 20, 2014 to Thursday May 22, 2014

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Professor Sibel Bozdogan (Harvard University), Dr. Kemal Kirisci (Brookings Institute), Dr. Resat Kasaba (Jackson School)

European Union Center of Excellence of Seattle, Middle East Center

euc@uw.edu

The EU Center of Excellence, the Center for West European Studies, the Middle East Center, and the Jackson School of International Studies present three lectures and a roundtable discussion focusing on Turkey’s relationship with the European Union, Europe and the West. Professor Sibel Bozdogan of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design will give two lectures on the rebuilding of Istanbul in the twentieth century. Dr. Kemal Kirisci, TUSIAD Senior Fellow, Brookings Institute, will give a talk titled “Fifty Years of EU-Turkish Relations in Turbulent Times: Where to Go from Here?” followed by a roundtable discussion with Drs. Kirisci, Bozdogan, and Kasaba.
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PERLA Event - A presentation with Dr. Maria Lemos, FHRCR

Latin American Studies

Thursday May 22, 2014
12:00-1:15 pm
Thomson 317, University of Washington, Seattle Campus

Dr. Maria Lemos, FHCRC

lasuw@ uw.edu | 206.685.3435

Topic of presentation will be available at a later date.

PERLA - Program in Education and Research in Latin America

Mission Statement:
To encourage multidisciplinary research, training and implementation activities and provide a forum to bring together U.S. and Latin American researchers, faculty and students to improve the health and well-being of Latin American people.

Collaborations:
Although the majority of current research and training efforts and funding are directed towards Peru, faculty, students and colleagues are also active in Mexico, and most countries in Central and South America. PERLA will work with Schools, Departments and Administration within the University of Washington and affiliated institutions to identify and ease practical impediments to interdisciplinary collaboration in research and training in Latin American countries. Nearly all Schools within the UW have sent students or faculty to participate in research or training activities in Latin America, including: the Schools of Arts and Sciences, Medicine, Public Health, Built Environments, Forestry, Nursing, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Information, Public Affairs and Social Work

 


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Recent Publications on/in Uzbekistan: Naim Karimov, ed.Tarixning hasratli sahifalari (Sad pages of history). Tashkent: Sharq Nashriyoti, 2006

Ellison Center

Friday May 23, 2014
12:30-1:30/1:40 pm
Denny Hall 123

Ilse Cirtautas, Department of Near Eastern Languages & Civilization, UW

Central-Inner Asian Studies Seminar

icirt@uw.edu

This book provides us with heartbreaking details of the torturous methods the Soviets had in place to interrogate people whom theyhad singled out to convict. The chapter “Qatag’on devri dahshatlari” (The Horrors of the Persecution Period) gives accounts of interrogations pp.191-209). We also learn that on just a single day (e.g., August 23, 1937) in one court meeting 95 people were sentenced to death (p.191). The book should be translated into English.


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KERATON 2014: THE AUTHENTIC INDONESIAN MARKET.

Jackson School Faculty Information

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

Jackson School PhD Program

Southeast Asia Center

Saturday May 24, 2014
TBA
The HUB

Indonesian Students Association of UW and the Southeast Asian Center

asianll@uw.edu

 On May 24, 2014, ISAUW will once again be presenting our largest cultural event of the year, “KERATON 2014: THE AUTHENTIC INDONESIAN MARKET.” Traditional food, souvenir bazaar, traditional dances, games and other interactive activities will be carried out throughout the night. All these highlights of the night will be thoroughly selected to showcase the indigenous Indonesian culture. In addition, we will proudly be presenting Batik, the traditional Indonesian clothing, as the dress code for the night.
This is also an effort to introduce Batik and traditional activities to
the global audience.

The perfomances will consist of traditional dances and music like Tari Legong, Gamelan, Angklung, and many more. In addition, Batik demonstration and showcase compliments the experience for the night. Delicious Indonesian cuisine from different regions will also complete the night. The food featured will include popular Indonesian dishes such as Rendang, Nasi Padang, Satay, Lontong Cap Gomeh, Mie Bakso, and many more mouth-watering food.


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East Asian Security Challenges and Japan's New Strategy under Abe

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Jackson School eNewsletter

Japan Studies Program

Korea Studies Program

Wednesday May 28, 2014
7:00 - 8:30 PM
Kane Hall 210

Shinichi Kitaoka, National Graduate Institure for Policy Studies

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Mitsubishi Corporation

For information on details and registration for this event please contact japan@uw.edu

Mitsubishi Corporation Lecture Series 2013-14

   Shinichi Kitaoka is a professor at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, and Executive Director of Research for the Institute for International Policy Studies (IIPS). He is a leading scholar in modern Japanese political and diplomatic history and has published on topics such as security issues, foreign policy, domestic politics, constitutional revision, and the United Nations. He earned degrees from the University of Tokyo (BA 1971, MA 1973, and Ph.D. 1976) and was a visiting fellow at Princeton University (1981-83). Dr. Kitaoka’s activities as a public intellectual include the participation in bilateral talks with the U.S., China (Japan-China 21st Century Friendship Committee), Korea (Japan-Korea Joint Study of History), Germany, India, and Singapore. Currently he is the Chairman of the Japanese scholars in Japan-China Joint Study of History that was established by President Hu Jintao and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in 2006.

Free and open to the public. Registration is appreciated. To register for this event contact JAPAN@UW.EDU

 


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Indian Classical Music Performance - Soul of Sound: Gundecha Brothers

South Asia Center

Friday May 30, 2014
Time: 7:00 PM
Location: Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center, 201 Mercer Street Seattle, WA 98109

Performers: Gundecha Brothers

Sponsor: Cornish College of the Arts

Contact: Cornish College of the Arts, http://www.cornish.edu/music/series/#contact

Dhrupad is the oldest and most serene form of Indian classical. Dhrupad concerts explore ragas in depth, providing elaborate alaps (improvisations) in four different speeds, followed by compositions rendered to the rhythm of the accompanying pakhawaj, and further improvisations in rhythm. Gundecha Brothers perform Dhrupad concerts in the jugalbandi style - singing together, and going back and forth. This provides additional beauty and interest as their voices and ideas merge and separate.

"At their most venturesome, the brothers voices seemed more supple and versatile than any string instrument." - Washington Post

Tickets: $25-45 general; $20 seniors; $20 students (with ID)

For tickets and more information about the Gundecha Brothers, visit Cornish's event page.


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2nd ANNUAL STUDENTS CONFERENCE IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN LANGUAGES 2014 (TAGALOG) at the University of Washington

Jackson School Information

Jackson School PhD Program

Southeast Asia Center

Saturday May 31, 2014

University of Washington

Department of Asian Languages and Literature and Southeast Asian Center, University of Washington

atienzar@u.washington.edu

 This one-day conference provides a forum for students who have been learning Tagalog from institutions in the US and around the world to use Tagalog in presenting their research and topic interests. Participants will have the opportunity to share their ideas and gain valuable experience in presenting their work for discussion with other students. Presentation and discussion will be conducted in Tagalog.

 

We welcome the applications from intermediate high and advanced Tagalog students from all fields, including but not limited to history, literature, linguistics, political science, archeology, environmental studies, economics and anthropology. Intermediate high and advanced (non-native) speakers who are not students will also be considered.


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2nd ANNUAL STUDENTS CONFERENCE IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN LANGUAGES 2014 (KHMER)

Jackson School Information

Jackson School PhD Program

Southeast Asia Center

Saturday May 31, 2014

University of Washington

Department of Asian Languages and Literature and Southeast Asian Center, University of Washington

yinluoth@yahoo.com

This one-day conference provides a forum for students who have been learning Khmer from institutions in the US and around the world to use Khmer in presenting their research and topic interests. Participants will have the opportunity to share their ideas and gain valuable experience in presenting their work for discussion with other students. Presentation and discussion will be conducted in Khmer.

We welcome the applications from intermediate high and advanced Khmer students from all fields, including but not limited to history, literature, linguistics, political science, archeology, environmental studies, economics and anthropology. Intermediate high and advanced (non-native) speakers who are not students will also be considered.


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July 2014
3rd Annual Polish Festival at Seattle Center

Ellison Center

Saturday July 12, 2014
12:00pm-8:00pm
Seattle Center- Armory & Fisher Rooftop, 305 Harrison Street, Seattle, WA 98109

Polish Home Foundation

http://www.polishfestivalseattle.org/

Polish Festival returns to Seattle Center on July 12, 2014 as part of Festal cultural programs. Come explore and experience Polish culture and traditions through live music and dance performances, workshops, traditional folk costumes, exhibits and children’s activities. Merchandise market place will showcase Polish glass art, hand-crafted pottery, amber jewelry, crystal, and cut-out paper art, as well as information about local Polish-American community organizations. The beer garden will be well stocked with a variety of imported Polish beer, and food vendors will serve plenty of authentic delicious Polish food.

New this year will be presentation of cultural traditions from northern Poland’s region known as Pomerania and Kashubia. The festival will also showcase the “Traditional Passions of Poland” and information on travel to Poland for business and pleasure.

For over a century, the Polish-American community of the Puget Sound has been active locally and is proud to participate in Festal to present Polish cultural traditions at the Seattle Center. 


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