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Jackson School Calendar of Events

For more events you can view each center or program's events page or go to the archive and advanced search link above. You can subscribe to our events mailing list here:
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This Week

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All Events


September 2014
Scale Drawing: Rethinking Theories of Globalization and Contemporary Art from South Asia

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Thursday September 25, 2014
6:00 PM
Art Building, Room 317, UW Campus, Seattle

Sonal Khullar

University of Washington School of Art

http://art.washington.edu/calendar/?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D110772145

 Art History Assistant Professor Sonal Khullar will discuss her research in a lecture titled "Scale Drawing: Rethinking Theories of Globalization and Contemporary Art from South Asia." This presentation is part of the tenure and promotion process. A reception will follow the lecture.

Please register if you plan to attend.


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Digital Tools for an International Classroom

Center for Global Studies

Thursday September 25, 2014
5:00 - 8:30 PM
Kane Hall 225

Ben Blink, Senior Policy Analyst, Google and other Google education experts

World Affairs Council, Google, Center for Global Studies, World Affairs Council of America

tleonard@uw.edu

How can educators best use the latest digital tools in their classrooms?  How can teachers connect to resources around the world?  Google education experts will showcase and demonstrate educational tools and resources.  Following this aspect of the workshop, Ben Blink will speak on Freedom and Power in the Digital Age as part of the public program. 

For more information or to register, visit www.world-affairs.org/events and click on Digital Tools for an International Classroom. Cost: $25.00. Registration includes light buffet, 3 clock hours, resource packet, and entry to wine reception and public program.

People who wish to attend only the public program with Ben Blink, and not the teacher workshop, may register with the World Affairs Council as well. Visit www.world-affairs.org for more details!


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"Indigenous Ways of Knowing Cultural Food Practices and Ecological Knowledge" in Canada and the US

Canadian Studies Center

Friday September 26, 2014 to Saturday September 27, 2014

University of Washington, Seattle

Canadian Studies Center

Canada@uw.edu, clotise@uw.edu

The University of Washington’s American Indian Studies Department invites you to a two-day symposium to be held September 26 and 27, 2014 in the Center for Urban Horticulture, University of Washington, Seattle campus.

“The Living Breath of Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ: Indigenous Ways of Knowing Cultural Food Practices and Ecological Knowledge,” will bring together will bring together individuals to share their knowledge and expertise on topics such as tribal food sovereignty initiatives, food justice and security, traditional foods and health, indigenous foods systems and global climate change, and treaty water and fishing rights.

Indigenous peoples in the Northwest have maintained a sustainable way of life through a cultural, spiritual, and reciprocal relationship with their environment. This symposium will serve to foster dialogue and build collaborative networks as we, Native peoples, strive to sustain our cultural food practices and preserve our healthy relationship to the land, water, and all living things.

This symposium honors the UW’s future longhouse-style community building, Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ (a Lushootseed word meaning Intellectual House), that will open its doors in February, 2015. This event symbolizes the spirit of Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ and embodies the essence of the work we envision doing in this cultural and intellectual space.


For more information contact Charlotte Coté at clotise@uw.edu.

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN:

To get the EARLY BIRD PRICE PLEASE REGISTER NOW: 125.00 for two days and 75.00 for one day. Please register before 12PM on Friday, September 12, 2014. After that the late registration fee is 140.00 per two days and 90.00 per day. Registration will close September 23. After September 23 you must register with the conference on the first day to attend. We urge you to register early here: https://www.regonline.com/register/login.aspx?eventID=1596396&MethodId=0&EventsessionId=! Our seats will fill quickly.

Registration includes a continental breakfast, local, organic traditional foods lunch, and coffee/tea for both days.

SPECIALS: In honor of the Northwest Indian College's “Our Food is our Medicine” conference taking place September 24-26th, their participants can attend our conference for a reduced rate. Our conference is free for students with UW ID subject to available seating. Elders (65 and older) are free and subject to available seating. NWIC participants, UW students, and elders need to Dian Million or register at the door. For all registration questions please email Dian Million with “conference registration” in the subject line: dianm@uw.edu, or leave a message at (206) 543-9082.


Charlotte Coté (Nuu-chah-nulth), Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of American Indian Studies
Chair, Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ Intellectual House Planning and Advisory Committee
Affiliated Faculty, Canadian Studies Center,
Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Box 354305, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195
Phone: (206)221-6549, Fax: (206)616-3122

Planning Committee:
Dr. Charlotte Coté, (chair), Dr. Dian Million, Clarita Lefthand Begay, Michelle Montgomery, Susan Balbas, Michelle Daigle, and Melissa Woodrow.
 


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The Invisible Hand

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Thursday September 4, 2014 to Sunday September 28, 2014
Various
ACT Theater, 700 Union Street, Seattle, WA 98101

ACT Theater

ACT Theater

http://acttheatre.org/Tickets/OnStage/TheInvisibleHand#sthash.1LdicbaW.dpuf

 When Nick, an American financial guru is captured and held by a militant Islamic organization in Pakistan, he is forced to raise his own 10 million dollar ransom. In his desperate quest to gain his freedom, he warms to the task, as does his captor and avid student, Bashir, with terrifying results. An important new voice in the American Theatre, Ayad Akhtar delivers a chilling examination of personal and political responsibility, and the shifting sands of the global power structure. -


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October 2014
The Good Life: Guatemalan Coffee, Cocaine, and Capabilities

Latin American Studies

Thursday October 2, 2014
4:30-6pm
Thomson Hall 101

Edward Fischer, Vanderbilt University

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Center for Global Studies, Latin and Caribbean Studies Department, and the Department of Anthropology

lasuw@u.washington.edu

Drawing from his new book, The Good Life, Vanderbilt anthropologist Edward Fischer, examines the culture, ethics, and economics of commodity chains. Fischer explores how peoples’ lives and aspirations for the good life get attached to things and global value chains. He also makes a case for what anthropology can contribute to public policy debates. Edward F. Fischer is Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt University. He is also the founder of Maní+, a program in Guatemala that develops and produces locally sourced complementary foods to fight malnutrition. He has written and edited several books, including Cultural Logics and Global Economies, Broccoli and Desire, and Cash on the Table. His new book, The Good Life: Aspiration, Dignity, and the Anthropology of Wellbeing is being published by Stanford University Press.
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Careers in Asian Law: Perspective from a UW Alumnus

Alumni Relations

Career Services

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Thursday October 2, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Allen Auditorium, Allen Library

Jody Chafee, MA '88 JD '91, Director & Expert Cousel at Starbucks

Sponsored by the department of Asian Languages and Literature

For more information contact asianll@uw.edu

The Department of Asian Languages and Literature invites all interested students to an informal presentation and questions and-answer session from a UW Jackson School and School of Law alumnus about his perspectives on careers in the field of Asian law. Mr. Chafee is a commercial attorney at Starbucks Coffee Company and was formerly a principal at Riddell Williams law firm in Seattle. He focuses on technology, corporate and securities transactions. He received his B.A. in Asian Studies from Dartmouth College, cum laude, in 1985. He has a Masters of International Studies in Japan Area Studies (1988) and a J.D. from the University of Washington School of Law (1991). His course work included numerous classes in Japanese language and literature. Mr. Chafee was formerly with the Seattle firm of Lane Powell Spears Lubersky and served as a foreign legal consultant with Miyake Hatasawa and Yamasaki in Tokyo, Japan.


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Stars and seasons: can we replicate ancient Chinese celestial measurements?

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Friday October 3, 2014
12:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Christopher Cullen, Honorary Professor of the History of East Asian Science, Technology, and Medicine, University of Cambridge

cgreed@uw.edu

Historians of ancient astronomy in China and elsewhere tend to spend most of their time looking at texts, sometimes supplemented by the few surviving artefacts relevant to their investigations. For those interested in the quantitative aspects of astronomy, there are also sophisticated 'planetarium' computer programmes that can show the positions of celestial bodies as seen from any position on earth, and at any instant in the past few thousand years. It is quite rare to find historians of astronomy who spend much time looking at the sky itself. There may be good reasons for this: for instance, we may fear that the 'gaze' of a modern researcher on the sky can differ in important respects from that of an ancient observer, and hence that any conclusions based on such experience may be misleading. Without discounting such fears, this talk will describe some attempts to reconstruct certain ancient Chinese observational procedures, and will reflect on what may be learned from such an experiment.


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Rivers for Life: Cultural Resistance to the Xalalá Dam

Latin American Studies

Monday October 6, 2014
5:00-7pm
Allen Library, Allen Auditorium

Victor Caal Tuzy, NISGUA 2014 Fall Tour

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies Department and the American Indian Studies Department

lasuw@u.washington.edu

Join the Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala (NISGUA) and the Association of Communities for Development and the Defense of Land and Natural Resources (ACODET), sharing stories of community-based organizing and resistance to the Xalalá Hydroelectric Dam – a government imposed project that would, if constructed, irreparably damage the land, livelihoods and culture of nearly 100 Maya Q’eqchi’ indigenous communities in Guatemala. ACODET Coordinator Victor Caal Tzuy will speak about the role of Maya Q’eqchi’ culture in his community’s resistance to the Xalalá dam. Victor Caal Tuzy is an educator, a community organizer, a human rights defender, and a founding member of ACODET.
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The Archaeology of a Looting: The Modern History of the Warring States Silk Manuscripts from the Chu Tomb at Zidanku, Changsha

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Friday October 10, 2014
12:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Donald Harper, Centennial Professor of Chinese Studies, University of Chicago

cgreed@uw.edu


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The World in Transition: Asia and the Twilight of America's Century

East Asia Center

Monday October 13, 2014
7:00 p.m.
Kane Hall 225

Donald C. Hellmann, Professor, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and the Department of Political Science, University of Washington

cgreed@uw.edu


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Producing Some Na Ceremonies: Film Screening and Discussion

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Monday October 13, 2014
3:30 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Tami Blumenfield Assistant Professor of Asian Studies, Furman University

cgreed@uw.edu

Some Na Ceremonies, created by Na directors Onci Archei and Ruheng Duoji and produced by U.S. anthropologist Tami Blumenfield, is a montage of five short pieces. Representations of Na people (also known as Moso) usually center on their matrilineal  kinship system, overlooking religion, a central aspect in the lives of Na people. This film's directors decided to intervene in this omission, capturing important ceremonies on digital video. Ranging from a village film festival, to a pig-sacrifice ceremony, to a three-day funerary ceremony, the ceremonies presented here are riveting, elaborate and meaningful. By avoiding interpretation or voice-over narration but using carefully crafted visual images, the film emphasizes the partiality of any representational attempt. The ceremonies presented are but a glimpse of a much larger ceremonial and spiritual world.

Some Na Ceremonies is an outgrowth of the Moso Media Project, a collaborative, participatory media project that involved providing resources and training for Na people interested in creating and editing digital media, then facilitating community conversations.

Tami Blumenfield is an anthropologist of China and filmmaker. She is the James B. Duke Assistant Professor of Asian Studies at Furman University. She received her PhD in Sociocultural Anthropology from the University of Washington in 2010. Blumenfield researches educational practices, cultural heritage politics, social change and media production in ethnically diverse regions of southwest China. Much of her research has explored social change in Na villages located in and around tourist zones near Lugu Lake. Her book manuscript Screening Moso: Communities of Media in Southwest China, supported by a publication fellowship from the American Association for University Women, discusses her collaboration and participatory media project with the Moso Folk Museum and involvement with the Moso Culture Research Association.

 


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India’s “Transformative Moment”? Modi, the Economy and Aerospace

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Tuesday October 14, 2014
3:30-5:00 PM
TBD

Dinesh Keskar (Boeing) & Anand Yang (UW)

Trade Development Alliance of Greater Seattle

Registration: The cost for this event is $25 for members and $35 for non-members. For questions, contact Samantha Paxton at (206) 389.7319 / samanthap@seattletradealliance.com.

 The landslide election victory of Prime Minister Narendra Modi reflect widespread discontent with a flagging economic performance and shrinking job opportunities that beset India following the country’s rebound after the 2008 financial crisis. The new government’s 2014-2015 budget lists a variety of new measures to jump-start economic growth:

- Increasing caps on foreign investment for defense and insurance
- Implementing a more uniform national sales tax and
- Infrastructure projects in areas from airports and railways and roads.

Tata Group, one of India’s largest conglomorates with a presence in Greater Seattle, has already announced plans to benefit from this new economic agenda by highlighting new areas of growth including defense and aerospace, finance and infrastructure.

All of this matters for businesses in Washington state, which exported over $2.2 billion in goods to India in 2013. How might new leadership in the country impact the Indian consumer market as well as key industries such as aerospace and aviation, engineering and financial services?

__________________________________________

Dinesh Keskar is the Senior Vice President of Sales, Asia Pacific and India for Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

Anand A. Yang is Professor of International Studies and History at the University of Washington, Seattle. Between 2002 and 2010, he was Director of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and the Golub Chair of International Studies. Prior to joining UW in 2002, Yang taught at Sweet Briar College and the University of Utah, where he was chair of the History Department and, subsequently, Director of its Asian Studies Program.


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Applied International Studies MA Online Info Meeting

Master of Arts in Applied International Studies

Wednesday October 15, 2014
5:00pm (PDT)
Online

Jennifer Butte-Dahl

maais@uw.edu

Learn more about the Master of Arts in Applied International Studies and speak with the Program Director, Jennifer Butte-Dahl. RSVP here.

www.jsis.washington.edu/maais 


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Bao Shichen and Grain Tribute Reform in Early Nineteenth-Century China

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Thursday October 16, 2014
3:30 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

William Rowe, John and Diane Cooke Professor of Chinese History, Johns Hopkins University

cgreed@uw.edu

The Qing empire in the early nineteenth century was wracked by a pervasive sense of crisis, which led to a broad-based reform movement, both in and out of government. One of the major policy areas of both the crisis and the reform efforts – arguably the centerpiece of it all – was the highly controversial and protracted  debate over the reform of the grain tribute system and the proposed move from shipment of southern tax grain north via the Grand Canal under bureaucratic auspices to shipment along the maritime coast via private commercial carriers.

What I propose to do here is offer a systematic reading of writings on this issue by one individual who was very close to the center of the debate: Bao Shichen (1775-1855). My goal is to determine what Bao and other reformers felt was at stake in this crisis – that is, what needed to be defended or protected – as well as what were the capabilities and limitations of the (faltering?) imperial state to deal with this, and what might have been the impact of changing times on the situation as a whole.

In short, what I hope to present is a contribution to our overall understanding of what the reformism of this era was about, and of the significance of this historical moment in Qing and imperial history.


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His Own Received Him Not: Jimmy Carter, Progressive Evangelicalism, and the Religious Right: Comparative Religion Annual Lecture

Comparative Religion

Thursday October 16, 2014
7:30 PM
Kane Hall, room 110

Prof. Randall Balmer, Dartmouth College

Comparative Religion Program

lpaxton@uw.edu

 Prof. Balmer will speak on, "Redeemer: The Life of Jimmy Carter and The Making of Evangelicalism: From Revivalism to Politics and Beyond."

(His book, Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: A Journey into the Evangelical Subculture in America, now in its fourth edition, was made into an award-winning, three-part documentary for PBS.)


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Food Globalization in Prehistory

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Friday October 17, 2014
12:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Xinyi Liu, Assistant Professor of Archaeology, Washington University in St. Louis

cgreed@uw.edu

Scholarly interest has increasingly focused on an episode of Old World globalization of food resources that significantly predates the ‘Silk Road’. The impetus behind this growth of interest has been the expansion of bio-archaeological research in Central and East Asia over the past decade. This paper considers the agents responsible for the food globalization process in prehistory and the forms they took. One of the key aspects of the Trans-Eurasian movements of crops in prehistory was that the movements were not to regions devoid of existing starch-based agriculture, but instead constituted an addition to that agricultural system. Other economic plants, such as grapes, dates and peas, also moved significant distances. However, the novel starchy crops held a particular significance; they went on to become significant staple foods in many of their new destinations. Drawn from recent discovery from western China, I will take into consideration differences in the projected archaeological signatures of different potential agents involved in transmission of the crops.


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The Thai Coup 2014: Return to the Past, Following the Chinese Model

Southeast Asia Center

Monday October 20, 2014
12:30 - 2:00 PM
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Charles F. Keyes (Professor Emeritus, Anthropology and International Studies)

Southeast Asia Center

seac@uw.edu

Description:

On May 22, 2014, the Thai military led by General Prayuth Chan-Ocha successfully seized power of the government of Thailand. This was the 12th military coup in Thailand since 1932 when absolute monarchy was ended.

The new government headed by General Prayuth is attempting to turn back the Thai political clock to a time to before 1976 when, the new leaders believe, the country was united under the monarchy and everyone knew his place in the social order. At the same time, the new leaders are looking to China where a system of autocratic capitalism prevails as a model for the current Thai polity.

Because the latest coup in Thailand took place when much of the world’s attention has been focused on events in the turbulent Middle East and the conflict between Ukraine and Russia few have given attention to the implications of Thai coup. In this talk, I will review the recent political history of Thailand that led up to the coup and then reflect on how the coup makes Thailand a exemplar of what Michael Ignatieff has called the “new world disorder”. Finally, I will reflect on whether the Thai military’s vision of Thailand can succeed or not.

Professor Keyes' Bio:

Charles F. Keyes is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and International Studies at the University of Washington. His research focuses on religion and political-economic change, the sociology of Theraveda Buddhism, ethnic group relations, and Southeast Asia. He is interested in how states intrude into everyday lives and how minority peoples respond to modern projects of nation-building. His latest book, Finding Their Voice: Northeastern Villagers and The Thai State, was published in April, 2014.
 


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The Human Rights Crisis in Central America: Conversations and Music from Honduran Artist and Feminist Karla Lara

Latin American Studies

Wednesday October 22, 2014
5:00-6:30pm
Thomson 101

Karla Lara, Respect Dignity, and Resistance Tour 2014

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and Comparative History of Ideas

lasuw@u.washington.edu

Karla Lara is a member of the National Network of Women Human Rights Defenders in Honduras, which participates in the Meso-American Initiative of Women Human Rights Defenders. Karla is a feminist and a singer/artist and a member of Artistas en Resistencia. Her children are members of the Frente Revolucionario Artistico Contra Cultural.
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Why are the Border Kids Fleeing? Human Rights and U.S. Policy in Honduras and Central America

Latin American Studies

Thursday October 23, 2014
7:00pm
Thomson 101

Dana Frank, University of California, Santa Cruz

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Center for Human Rights, Comparative History of Ideas, and the Department of History

lasuw@u.washington.edu

Media reports of unaccompanied, undocumented children arriving at the U.S. border from Central America have depicted their flight from gangs and violence. But silence largely reigns regarding the underlying economic and political roots of the crisis, in dangerous governments supported by the United States. This presentation looks at human rights and U.S. policy in post-coup Honduras, in particular, as well as dynamics within Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua. It will also discuss grassroots efforts across the U.S. and in Congress to affect U.S. policy in Central America.
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From the Lowly Lubok to Soviet Realism: Early Twentieth Century Children's Books from Russia

Ellison Center

Monday June 30, 2014 to Friday October 24, 2014

Allen Library

UW Libraries, Special Collections

Allen Library

This exhibition in Special Collections, curated by Pamela K. Harer, brings together rare and scarce Russian children’s books from early in the 20th century and represents some of the most striking book design and illustration known to the field. Most of the books included date from between the two World Wars, during the period of the Russian Revolution and were considered “a major weapon for education.” See the work of Pakhomov, Konashevich, Lebedev and Lissitzky. The names of the artists may be unfamiliar but the images and design elements are unforgettable.

For more information visit:
http://www.lib.washington.edu/about/news/exhibits/calendar?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D110479136


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Electrifying India Book Launch

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Thursday October 30, 2014
3:30 PM
Thomson Hall 317, UW Campus, Seattle

Sunila S. Kale, Assistant Professor of International Studies at UW

South Asia Center, Jackson School of International Studies, UW

sascuw@uw.edu

 Sunila S. Kale, Assistant Professor of International Studies at UW, will present from her recently published book Electrifying India: Regional Political Economies of Political Development.

Throughout the 20th century, electricity was considered to be the primary vehicle of modernity, as well as its quintessential symbol. In India, electrification was central to how early nationalists and planners conceptualized Indian development, and huge sums were spent on the project from then until now. Yet despite all this, sixty-five years after independence nearly 400 million Indians have no access to electricity.Electrifying India explores the political and historical puzzle of uneven development in India’s vital electricity sector.

In some states, nearly all citizens have access to electricity, while in others fewer than half of households have reliable electricity. To help explain this variation, this book offers both a regional and a historical perspective on the politics of electrification of India as it unfolded in New Delhi and three Indian states: Maharashtra, Odisha, and Andhra Pradesh. In those parts of the countryside that were successfully electrified in the decades after independence, the gains were due to neither nationalist idealism nor merely technocratic plans, but rather to the rising political influence and pressure of rural constituencies. In looking at variation in how public utilities expanded over a long period of time, this book argues that the earlier period of an advancing state apparatus from the 1950s to the 1980s conditioned in important ways the manner of the state’s retreat during market reforms from the 1990s onward.


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The Measurement of Longitude in 17th-18th Century China and Its Applications in Astronomy and Geography

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Friday October 31, 2014
12:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Xiaoshun Sun, Institute for the History of Natural Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences

cgreed@uw.edu


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November 2014
The Art of the Indo-Persian Album

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Sunday November 2, 2014
4:00 PM
Seattle Asian Art Museum, Volunteer Park

Keelan Overton, Associate Curator of Islamic Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Seattle Art Museum, The Gardner Center for Art and Ideas

http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/visit/calendar/events?EventId=29302

 Early modern period Indo-Persian albums of painting and calligraphy included important portraits of rulers. These portraits circulated between India and Iran, often with encoded messages that provide insight into the political and cultural realities of the day.

Keelan Overton, Associate Curator of Islamic Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Held in connection with the current installation at the Asian Art Museum, Mughal Painting: Power and Piety.

Tickets: $10; SAM members $5 www.visitsam.org/tickets


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Children's Well-being in Contemporary China: Poverty and Inequality in the Children's Well-Being Survey 2014

East Asia Center

Monday November 3, 2014
12:30 p.m.
Parrington Hall 305

Wen-Jui Han, New York University and NYC-ECNU Institute for Social Development at NYU Shanghai

cgreed@uw.edu


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Domination, Integration, and Betrayal

Jackson School Information

Wednesday November 5, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

Raymond Jonas

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

  

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures


The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.


In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.


Part 1: Domination, Integration, and Betrayal
The Great War signaled the terminal crisis of the European old regime–a crisis more than a century in the making. Pursuing the story of this crisis across themes of domination, integration, and betrayal, Professor Jonas will consider the rivalries that underpinned the war and the bleak geopolitical thinking that informed them. Jonas will explore the political culture that obliterated tolerance for difference, finding the foundations of power in nation and race. Finally, he will ask us to ponder the responsibilities of the powerful, viewed with the eyes of the young men they had persuaded to fight.

Raymond Jonas is a Professor of History at the University of Washington. His most recent book is The Battle of Adwa: African Victory in the Age of Empire. He is currently working on European expansion into postindependence Latin America.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.


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Anything is Possible: How to Overcome Obstacles and Make a Difference

Center for West European Studies

European Union Center of Excellence

Hellenic Studies

Comparative Religion

Thursday November 6, 2014
6:30 PM
Kane Hall, room 130

Senator Olympia Snowe (R-Maine 1995-2013)

UW Graduate School UW Alumni Association Department of Communication Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Department of Political Science

Yvette Moy, yvettef@uw.edu

 You do not need to be an alum of the University of Washington to attend or register. Ticikets go public 9/23.

Olympia Snowe's dedicated work in the U.S. Senate has garnered her nationwide recognition as a leading policymaker in Washington. In 2005, she was named the 54th most powerful woman in the world by Forbes magazine. In 2006, Time magazine named her one of the top ten U.S. Senators. Calling her "The Caretaker," it wrote of Snowe: "Because of her centrist views and eagerness to get beyond partisan point scoring, Maine Republican Olympia Snowe is in the center of every policy debate in Washington, but while Snowe is a major player on national issues, she is also known as one of the most effective advocates for her constituents." With her election in 1994, Senator Snowe became only the second woman Senator in history to represent Maine, following the late Sen. Margaret Chase Smith, who served from 1949 - 1973. In November 2006, she was re-elected to a third six-year term in the United States Senate with 74 percent of the vote.


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The Rise of Explication in the Mathematics of Late Imperial China

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Friday November 7, 2014
12:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Jeff Chen, Associate Professor of Mathematics, St. Could State University

cgreed@uw.edu

In the textual tradition of Chinese mathematics, reasoning or explanation did not figured prominently with few exceptions. This long-held practice of not including explanations in mathematical works was especially prevalent in treatises composed during the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). This began to change however in the first part of the 17thcollaborators embarked on various projects to translate European scientific into Chinese. By the end of the 17th or steps in computational algorithms became a fixture in the main text of most treatises. In this presentation, the comparison will be made of mathematical works in three categories: Ming treatises composed before the arrival of the Jesuits, geometric texts that attempt to make translated works more accessible, and those on traditional subjects with ample explanation in the main texts. The focus of the analysis is on the arrangement of various types of content material
in the main texts in the treatises. Based on our preliminary investigation, our thesis is that the introduction of European mathematics into China served as a catalyst to inspire the emergence in the main texts of explanations, which previously took place in oral exchanges between masters and disciples or in the correspondence between friends. Moreover, the presence of explanations in the text, resembling the commentary and annotations in classical studies, elevated the status of mathematics from a collection of problems and solutions similar to a practitioner’s manual to legitimate intellectual study. We will also examine what explanation in mathematics meant to scholars in the 17th century when the Jesuits and their Chinese century, explanations of underlying principles century.


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Natural and Unnatural Disasters: 3/11, Asbestos, and the Unmaking of Japan’s Modern World

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday November 7, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Loctaion TBD

Prof. Brett Walker

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

  The massive earthquake of 2011 unleashed a tsunami that swept away entire communities. Along with an enduring nuclear legacy, it also left an estimated 25 millions tons of rubble, much of it contaminated with asbestos and other carcinogenic toxins. Indeed, the unnatural disaster of cleaning up Japan’s pulverized and aerosolized built environment remained. This talk investigates asbestos in the construction and, more importantly, destruction of Japan’s built environment, with a focus on the impact of the 3/11 disaster and the later clean up. (Part of a larger Guggenheim-funded project concerned with the unmaking of the modern built world, and what it means for the future of human health.)

Brett L. Walker is Regents Professor and Michael P. Malone Professor of History at Montana State University, Bozeman. His research and teaching interests include Japanese history, world environmental history, and the history of science and medicine. He is author of The Conquest of Ainu Lands: Ecology and Culture in Japanese Expansion, 1590-1800, The Lost Wolves of Japan, Toxic Archipelago: A History of Industrial Disease in Japan, and the forthcoming A Concise History of Japan, from Cambridge University Press. He has also co-edited two volumes. He spends most of his time in southwestern Montana and the San Juan Islands, where he enjoys the outdoors.


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Ethnomusicology Visiting Artist Event: Didik Nini Thowok

Southeast Asia Center

Monday November 10, 2014
7:30 PM
Brechemin Auditorium

Didik Nini Thowok and Christina Sunardi

School of Music

csunardi@uw.edu

Didik Nini Thowok, a master dancer from Java, Indonesia, is known throughout Indonesia for his unique style combining classical, folk, modern, and comedic dance forms. One of the few artists to continue the long Indonesian tradition of “Traditional Cross Gender“ in the dance form, Didik is renowned for his talent in impersonating female characters and for his skill in various dance traditions such as topeng (mask dance), Sundanese, Cirebon, Balinese, and of course Central Javanese. In this free event, Didik Nini Thowok and School of Music faculty member Christina Sunardi perform cross-gender dances and discuss Didik’s work as an artist. More info


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Korea Peninsula Forum 2014: Northeast Asian Regional Dynamics

East Asia Center

East Asia Resource Center

Jackson School Information

Korea Studies Program

Wednesday November 12, 2014
6:00-7:30 PM
Kane Hall - Walker-Ames Room

Christopher Hill

Center for Korea Studies

uwcks@uw.edu

For the first ground-breaking event for the Korean Peninsula Forum, Center for Korea Studies invites Christopher Robert Hill, the former United States ambassador to the Republic of Korea and currently the Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, to give a public presentation. The Korea Peninsula Forum aims at enhancing the understanding and visibility of issues related to the Korean peninsula in the Northwest America and beyond. The Forum is proposed and sponsored by the Center for Korea Studies at University of Washington and will be supported by Korea Foundation.


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From Empires to Nation States

Jackson School Information

Wednesday November 12, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

Devin Naar

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

 

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures


The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.


In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.


Part 2: From Empires to Nation-States
The Great War irrevocably transformed the map of Europe and the Middle East by provoking the dissolution of the major empires of the Hapsburgs, Romanovs, and Ottomans. This lecture will focus on the final years of the Ottoman Empire, the role of the war in galvanizing new nation-states in the region, and the cataclysmic impact of these processes on diverse populations. Professor Naar will also explain how issues at stake in 1914 continue to echo today in the lands of the former Ottoman empire.


Devin E. Naar is a Professor of History, the Marsha and Jay Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies, and Chair of the Sephardic Studies Program at the University of Washington. He teaches courses on Jewish history, the Ottoman Empire, and Greece, and is completing a book about the city of Salonica.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.


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Applied International Studies MA Online Info Meeting

Master of Arts in Applied International Studies

Thursday November 13, 2014
5:00pm (PDT)
Online

Jennifer Butte-Dahl

maais@uw.edu

 Learn more about the Master of Arts in Applied International Studies and speak with the Program Director, Jennifer Butte-Dahl. RSVP details coming soon.

www.jsis.washington.edu/maais


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Home Fronts and Battle Fronts

Jackson School Information

Wednesday November 19, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

Jordanna Bailkin

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

  

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures


The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.
In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.

Part 3: Home Fronts and Battle Fronts
One of the most enduring concepts that we associate with the Great War is the idea of diametrically opposed “home fronts” and “battle fronts.” Many of those who waged the war—and those who wrote about it afterwards—upheld this distinction between the bloody, scarred world of the men in the trenches and the sacred preserve of women and children non-combatants. Professor Bailkin’s lecture will look more closely at the idea of home fronts and battle fronts, considering the ways in which the Great War generated, but also ultimately challenged the idea of an absolute divide between the worlds of soldiers and civilians.

Jordanna Bailkin is the Giovanni and Amne Costigan Endowed Professor in European History at the University of Washington, where she teaches classes on British, European, and imperial history. She is the author, most recently, of the prize-winning book, The Afterlife of Empire. She is currently writing a book about refugee camps in Britain.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.
 


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December 2014
Cultural Death and Radical Hope

Jackson School Information

Wednesday December 3, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

John Toews

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

 

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures

The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.
In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.

Part 4: Cultural Death and Radical Hope
By tracing the post- 1914 transformation of the legacy of philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, Professor Toews will examine how the critical intellectual traditions of the central European fin-de-siècle were recreated and transfigured in the shadow of catastrophe. Toews will place Nietzsche’s legacy in the context of contemporaneous developments within the intellectual traditions of Marxism and psychoanalysis, showing how disillusionment with the foundational myths of Western humanism and historicism produced widespread commitment to the radical cultural construction of a “New Man” and new “World Order,” a commitment that ultimately culminated in the fascist regimes of the 1920s and 1930s.

John Toews is the Joff Hanauer Distinguished University Professor for Western Civilization and Professor of History and the Comparative History of Ideas. He teaches courses in modern European intellectual history and his most recent book is Becoming Historical:Cultural Reformation and Public Memory in Early Nineteenth-Century Berlin. He is currently finishing a book on the early history of psychoanalysis.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.


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Applied International Studies MA Info Meeting

Master of Arts in Applied International Studies

Thursday December 4, 2014
5:00pm (PDT)
TBA, Downtown Seattle

Jennifer Butte-Dahl

maais@uw.edu

Learn more about the Master of Arts in Applied International Studies and speak with the Program Director, Jennifer Butte-Dahl. More details coming soon.

www.jsis.washington.edu/maais
 


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February 2015
CITY DWELLERS: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM INDIA

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Saturday August 30, 2014 to Sunday February 15, 2015
SAAM Hours
Seattle Art Museum, 1300 1st Ave, Seattle WA

Various

Seattle Art Museum

http://seattleartmuseum.org/exhibitions/citydwellers

 Bollywood movie culture, venerated politicians, religious traditions, and art historical icons all contribute to the myriad of influences in contemporary urban Indian culture. The artists in this exhibition pay tribute to this multitude even as they introduce elements of irony, introspection, and critique.

Through their photography and sculpture, the artists negotiate diverse ideas and influences on contemporary Indian society—Hindu mythology, Bollywood movies, Indian and western art, and icons of everyday life in a global market economy. Many of the works are influenced as much by popular movie culture and the use of digital technology as by the conventions of religious ritual and street processions, traditional theater, and dance.

Come see the colorful, contradictory, and complex India of today through the works of some of the country’s leading artists.


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June 2015
STUDY CANADA Summer Institute - Across the Salish Sea: Canada-US Connections in the Pacific Northwest

Canadian Studies Center

Monday June 22, 2015 to Friday June 26, 2015

Seattle, WA to Victoria, BC

Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada, Canadian Studies Center, UW, and Canadian American Center at Western Washington University

canada@uw.edu

The US today faces unprecedented demand for globally competent citizens and professionals. To this end, U.S. Department of Education Title VI grants support language training programs and area studies, including Canada, so that students learn more about the world and transnational trend. The U.S.D.O.E.-designated Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada offers the STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators annually to provide American educators with an excellent foundation for teaching about our vital political, economic, environmental and cultural relationships with Canada. For more than 35 years, teachers from every state have learned about core social studies topics related to Canada—such as geography, history, government, and economics—from university faculty and other experts. Important outcomes have always included gaining global perspectives of civic issues, receiving numerous resources for classroom use, and developing curricula that meet Common Core, C3 and state standards.

Registration opens November 1, 2014 and closes May 1, 2015 (or earlier, if maximum of 20 reached). See attached handout for additional details, visit www.k12studycanada.org/scsi.html for latest updates,​ or contact tina.storer@wwu.edu for further information. Flyer and registration info 


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