University of Washington
The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

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Jackson School Calendar of Events

For more events you can view each center or program's events page or go to the archive and advanced search link above. You can subscribe to our events mailing list here:
http://mailman13.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/jsis-uw

All Events

January 2015

Career Workshop: "Ten Secrets to passing the Foreign Service Test and becoming a US Diplomat".

Alumni Relations

Career Services

Tuesday January 27, 2015
4:30 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 101 (First Floor Auditorium)

Greg Shtraks

jcharltn@uw.edu

Date: Tuesday, January 27th
Time: 4:30 p.m.
Venue: Thomson Hall, Room 101 (Auditorium)


If you are interested in becoming a diplomat for the US Department of State, join us next week for an insider’s look at what it takes to pass the foreign service test and become a Foreign Service Officer. Jackson School doctoral fellow Greg Shtraks will lead a student-centric workshop designed to break down common test day pitfalls, offer exam tips, and explain what assessors look for during the foreign service exams. All are welcome, no RSVP required.

Greg Shtraks studied International Affairs and History at the George Washington University where he received his BA in 2005 and MA in 2009. After completing his Master's, Greg worked at the Department of State and then taught Political Science at Montclair State University in New Jersey


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Entertainment Industry in Korea: Synergy of Industrialization and Democratization

East Asia Center

Jackson School Information

Korea Studies Program

Tuesday January 27, 2015
3:30-5:00
Thomson 317

Sang Jo Jong

Center for Korea Studies

uwcks@uw.edu

 South Korea is unique in the sense that it achieved both industrialization and democratization in just half a century. During the course of rapid changes, it became clear that much benefit can be gained from the synergy of industrialization and democratization. In this colloquium, Prof. Sang Jo Jong will share with the audience how the entertainment industry was one of the sectors that benefited from such a synergy. His real-life case study on the entertainment industry in Korea will provide law and policy implications in other nations as well.

Currenntly serving as the Garvey Schubert Barer Visiting Professor at the University of Washington, Prof. Sang Jo Jong is the Dean and Professor of Law at Seoul National University. He graduated from Seoul National University and completed his Ph.D. studies at the London School of Economics. His researches and teachings focus on copyright, trademark, patent, and unfair competition laws. Prof. Jong has served as a civilian member of the Presidential Council of Intellectual Property, the Director of the Center for Law & Technology, Seoul National University and a Panel Member of the WIPO Arbitration and Mediation Center. His publications include “The Legal Protection of Computer Programs with Particular Reference to U.K., U.S., Japan & Korea,” “Contributory Infringement of Patents in Korea,” “Property versus Misappropriation: Legal Protection for Databases in Korea,” “Criminalization of Netizens for the Access to On-line Music,” and “Fair Use: A Tale of Two Cities, Intellectual Property in Common Law and Civil Law.”


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Returning Spirits

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Wednesday January 28, 2015
3:30 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Amalia Rubin, M.A. Candidate, University of Washington, JSIS

cgreed@uw.edu

Since the end of the socialist period, both Buddhism and Shamanism, the two traditional faiths of Mongolia, have undergone a great revival in the now-democratic Republic of Mongolia. With newly open borders and friendly visa policies, the country has also been flooded with Christian missionaries, eager to convert the post-soviet nations. As the three faiths have struggled to claim the souls of the first generation with religious freedom, Shamanism, despite its often-dubious standing and lack of historical official support, is reviving at an unprecedented speed. Furthermore, with nearly half of the Mongolian population residing in Ulaanbaatar, the traditionally countryside practice of Shamanism is now taking roots in a capital city. Drawing on fieldwork and literature, we will discuss 21st century shamanism in Ulaanbaatar and what it means to be a shaman in a city of nearly one and a half million people.


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How to Get Away with Murder on the Silk Road: The Life and Times of Sagamoi as Seen in Documents from Niya

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Wednesday January 28, 2015
3:30pm
Thomson 317

http://southasia.washington.edu/?p=812

Out of the many hundreds of documents in Chinese and Gāndhārī discovered at the Silk Road city of Niya (Xinjiang, PRC), some seventeen refer to a man named Sagamoi, who was involved in various activities and adventures including being accused of murder and fleeing across the Takla Makan desert to Kucha. Diego Loukota, a doctoral student at UCLA in Buddhist studies, will present this material and show how Sagamoi’s life and career illuminates life in this renowned oasis in the third Century CE.


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Lecture on "City Dwellers: Contemporary Art from India"

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Thursday January 29, 2015
7:00pm - 9:00pm
Bothell Library, Meeting Room, 18215 98th Avenue Northeast, Bothell, WA

http://www.kcls.org/calendar/detail.cfm?view=event&lib=4

 Bollywood movie culture, venerated politicians, religious traditions, and historical icons all contribute to the myriad of influences in contemporary urban Indian culture. Join Seattle Art Museum curatorial assistant Carrie Dedon, who will discuss the current S.A.M. exhibit "City Dwellers: Contemporary Art from India." Come see the colorful, contradictory, and complex India of today through the works of some of the country’s leading artists.


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JewDub Talks

Jewish Studies Program

Thursday January 29, 2015
7:00 pm
UW Tower Auditorium

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

Can a powerful idea be conveyed in fifteen minutes or less?

On Jan. 29, 2015 at 7 pm, the third annual JewDub Talks will present short lectures on big ideas in Jewish history and culture. Organized by the Stroum Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Washington, the one-night event features four outstanding UW faculty members giving pocket-sized talks on issues that are personally and intellectually compelling. This year’s speakers are:

Tamar Benzikry-Stern on Jewish Art

Daniel Bessner on Cold War Heroes

Noam Pianko on The Future of Jewish Peoplehood

Hamza Zafer on the Muslim-Jewish Connection

Check out our blog post about the event here!


How JewDub Talks Got Started

The Stroum Center for Jewish Studies prides itself on scholarship that directly engages with the community. Two years ago, we created a unique evening program inspired by the phenomenon of TED Talks, a global movement centered around “ideas worth spreading” through short talks given by experts in a wide range of fields. In our Seattle spin on this popular format, we selected four UW faculty members to give TED a Jewish twist.

The result? An engaged, enthusiastic audience, and a series of YouTube videos that is continuing to spark conversations. Previous year’s videos have reached more than 15,000 viewers around the world! Check them out here.

More information and registration can be found at: jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/


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The Resource-Conflict Nexus: Opium and Insurgency in the Shan State of Burma

Center for Global Studies

Friday January 30, 2015
12:00 - 1:20 PM
Gowen 1A (Olson Room)

John Buchanan, Political Science Ph.D. student and discussant Vanessa Quince, Ph.D. student

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment, Richard B. Wesley Graduate Student Fund for International Relations, Center for Global Studies, and Dep't of Political Science

ekgade@uw.edu

Please join us for a timely and interesting talk on Opium and Insurgency. The University of Washington International Security Colloquium (UWISC) is the only academic colloquium devoted to international security in the Pacific Northwest. The Colloquium is interdisciplinary and open to the public and sponsors seven to nine domestic and international speakers, as well as speakers from UW faculty and students. 


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Civic Engagement and the Management of Water Resources

Center for Global Studies

Friday January 30, 2015
6:00 - 7:00 PM
Meany Hall for the Performing Arts

Stevan Harrell, Professor UW Anthropology and UW Environmental and Forest Sciences and Michael Garrity, Director of American Rivers, Mina Girgis (Nile Project Founder) and select musicians.

UW World Series and Center for Global Studies, JSIS

tleonard@uw.edu

 Human life depends on the availability and quality of water to sustain our health, grow our food, power our homes with electricity and stimulate our economies. However, due to overpopulation, increased demand for food, climate change and pollution, as much as two-thirds of the world’s citizens may face water-stressed conditions severely impacting the living and economic conditions of communities, countries and regions by 2025. Without water, we cannot survive. How can we, as individuals, become more involved in the management of this precious and limited resource?

 
The Nile Project was founded in response to this question
 
Join us at 6 pm prior to The Nile Project's performance at Meany Hall on Friday, January 30 for a special pre-show panel discussion with Steven HarrellMichael Garrity, Nile Project founder Mina Girgis and select musicians. The panel will explore how innovative civic engagement strategies can create a common understanding between competing interests, and what are key challenges to implementing strategies across continents and cultures.   Note: This pre-show panel discussion is open to ticket holders only.  When ordering tickets use promo code UWWSNILE for 25% off. Tickets regularly $40.00 will be $30.00 and UW student tickets are $10.00.  Subject to availability.

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The Nile Project

Center for Global Studies

Friday January 30, 2015
8:00 PM
Meany Hall for the Performing Arts

UW World Series

uwworld series.org

Inspired by Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Project, Egyptian musicologist Mina Girgis and Ethiopian-American singer Meklit Hadero created their own, localized concert experience to raise awareness of the cultural and environmental challenges along the world’s longest river. Now touring, the Nile Project Brings together forward-thinking musicians from the 11 countries across the Nile Basin, channeling the unsung beauty of East African traditions to create the new sound of a shared Nile identity. In the collective’s collaborative compositions, resonant harps and lyres from up and down the river have learned new musical modes, combining the polyrhythmic styles of Lake Victoria and the pointed melodies of the Ethiopian highlands with the rich modal traditions of Egypt, and Sudan, that support vocals in more than ten languages.

For tickets, contact uwworldseries.org or call 206 543-4880. Tickets are $40.00 ($30.00 with promocode uwwsnile). UW student tickets $10.00. All tickets and seats subject to availability.


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"Pass or Fail in Cambodia Town" - PBS Documentary Viewing and Cultural Presentations

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

Southeast Asia Center

Friday January 30, 2015
6:00 to 8:00 p.m.; doors open at 5:30 p.m.
Wing Luke Museum, 719 S. King Street, Seattle

Southeast Asia Center, All Students Count Act, SEAe3d

Southeast Asia Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

allstudentscountwa@gmail.com

Please RSVP for this film screening and cultural event. The evening will include cultural performances by UW Lecturer Luoth Yin, the Lao Heritage Foundation, and a Vietnamese hip-hop group. Local students will share stories about the importance of disaggregate data.

Food will be provided!


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February 2015

The Persian Gulf States in Regional and International Politics

Middle East Center

Wednesday February 4, 2015
12:30 --1:20 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Kristian Coates Ulrichsen

Middle East Center

mecuw@uw.edu

 Presenter: Kristian Coates Ulrichsen is a Lecturer in the Middle East Center. Part of the "New Voices on the Middle East" series featuring new faculty experts on the Middle East.


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Jesters on the Streets: Satire in North Korea

East Asia Center

Jackson School Information

Korea Studies Program

Thursday February 5, 2015
3:30-5:00PM
Thomson 317

Dmitry mironenko

Center for Korea Studies

uwcks@uw.edu

As the Soviet state was going through the process of de-Stalinization at home and trying to implement the same policies abroad in its satellite countries, it brought the public in close contact with a rich body of satire, both contemporary and classic. The impact of this campaign on the North Korean society at large was profound as much as it was unexpected in its outcome. A call for an all-out satirical offensive was not too enthusiastically embraced by professional writers, but found a welcome audience with ordinary people who were also invited to participate in the nationwide process of satirizing their fellows. The working masses took to the new fad of self-made satire, finding in it the justification for their own tricks and pranks, much to the chagrin of cultural officials, as their productions quickly began to take them outside the boundaries set by the new policy. As a result, we see an explosion of street play during this period, with the street itself emerging as a site of play in the absence of a well-developed infrastructure of leisure and entertainment. This paper describes the genesis of the North Korean jester, first, as an object of official representation and, later, as an object of self-representation and the main protagonist of everyday shows of comic disobedience, which lay at the foundation of an emerging pervasive culture of antidiscipline.

Dima Mironenko received his B.A. in Diplomacy/Korean Studies from Moscow State University of International Relations in 2005 and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Korean History and Film and Visual Studies from Harvard University in 2007 and 2014, respectively. Dima’s research interests encompass cultural history, cinema and visual studies, humor, and the study of gender and sexuality. His dissertation “A Jester with Chameleon Faces: Laughter and Comedy in North Korea, 1954-1969” explores the question of agency within the realm of everyday living by looking at the emergence of a laughing subject in North Korea in the wake of the Korean War (1950-53) and the state’s efforts to discipline this subject through cinema. Dima is the founder of the Korean Cinémathèque at Harvard which he curated from 2009 to 2012. He is currently a Korea Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the Weatherhead East Asian Institute at Columbia University. In 2000, Dima spent a semester as an exchange student at Kim Il Sung University in Pyongyang

 


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Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium AGM

Canadian Studies Center

Friday February 6, 2015
9am - 4pm
Canadian Consulate, Seattle

Morna McEachern

Download Flyer here

 [50]


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Seth Holmes Author Visit

Latin American Studies

Monday February 9, 2015
12:00pm
South Campus Center Room 316

Dr. Seth Holmes, Dr. Ben Danielson from Odessa Brown Children's Clinic, and LMHC and Puentes Executive Director Maria-Jose Soerens

UW Medicine

UW Medicine

Come engage in an informal Q&A session with Dr. Seth Holmes, Dr. Ben Danielson from Odessa Brown Children's Clinic, and LMHC and Puentes Executive Director Maria-Jose Soerens . The focus of this panel will be on the roles that health professionals, educators, and social workers can play by working upstream to address the social determinants of health. Sponsored by Health Equity Circle and the Health Sciences Service Learning and Advocacy Group.

This event will be followed by a series of other related events. Click here for more detailed information


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Understanding the Syrian Refugee Crisis

Center for Global Studies

Wednesday February 11, 2015
5:30 - 8:30 PM
Great Hall at Greenlake, 7220 Woodlawn Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98115

Kathie Friedman , Associate Professor of International Studies,JSISUW and Rita Zawaideh, founder of Salaam Cultural Museum

World Affairs Council and Center for Global Studies, JSIS

alutterloh@world-affairs.org

Since the outbreak of civil war in March 2011, an estimated 9 million Syrians have fled their homes with over 3 million taking refuge in the neighboring countries of Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, and Iraq. After nearly four years of conflict, what are the current challenges facing the displaced Syrian people, half of whom are children?

First, educators will hear from Dr. Kathie Friedman, Associate Professor of International Studies at UW, on the gaps in protection for forced migrants in the region. With little opportunity for income-generating activities, food insecurity, and lack of access to social services, what efforts are being made to stem chronic vulnerability of Syrian refugees? Alternatively, how is the resettlement of this large population affecting the societies and economies of their host countries and what are humanitarian agencies doing to alleviate these pressures? Next, we will be joined by  Rita Zawaideh, 2013 Globalist of the Year award recipient and founder of Salaam Cultural Museum. Rita, who travels frequently to the Syria-Jordan border, will share her on the ground experience working with Syrian refugees and suggest ways to help your students understand and identify with the hardships caused by the Syrian conflict. 

*We will also be collecting school supplies for Rita to take back to the Malki-SCM Children’s Center in Amman on her next trip. If you are able, please bring a small donation of supplies such as pencils, notebooks, crayons, etc.

Kathie Friedman KasabaKathie Friedman Kasaba, PhD, is an associate professor at the Jackson School of International Studies and an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Sociology and the Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies. She is a faculty member in the interdisciplinary PhD program in Near and Middle Eastern studies. Friedman is the former chair of the Jewish studies program and previously directed the master’s program in international studies and the undergraduate honors thesis programs at the Jackson School. Her main area of study and research is comparative forced migrations and immigration, particularly to the United States and the European Union, with a focus on ethnic and political incorporation. Friedman’s publications include Memories of Migration: Gender, Ethnicity, and Work in the Lives of Jewish and Italian Women, New York 1870–1924; Creating and Transforming Households: The Constraints of the World Economy (coauthored); and a chapter titled “On Halloween We Dressed Up Like KGB Agents” in Sociology Confronts the Holocaust: Memories and Identities in Jewish Diasporas.

rita-zawaidehRita Zawaideh is a humanitarian and founder of the Salaam Cultural Museum. She was the winner of the 2013 Globalist of the Year Award and is the owner of Caravan-Serai Tours, a wholesale land tour company which designs tours for individuals and groups.. She travels frequently to the Middle Eastern region, and has just returned from leading a humanitarian mission in Lebanon. She has been working with a team of U.S. doctors and local volunteers distributing medical supplies and care along the Syria-Jordan border. She also founded the Arab American Community Coalition to help foster understanding between Arab Americans and the rest of the American society. 

 

Cost: $30 includes presentations, light buffet, resource packet, and 3 clock hours.

The entrance to the Great Hall at Greenlake is at the intersection of Woodlawn Ave NE and NE Maple Leaf Pl next to Mockingbird Books. Please join us in the Fireside Room on the second floor. 


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From War-Making to State-Making in the post-Soviet de facto States

Center for Global Studies

Friday February 13, 2015
12:00 - 1:20 PM
Gowen 1A (Olson Room)

Kristin Bakke, Senior Lecturer on Politics and International Relations, University College of London and discussant, Emily Gade, Ph.D. student UW

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment, Richard B. Wesley Graduate Student Fund for International Relations, Center for Global Studies, and Dep't of Political Science

ekgade@uw.edu

Please join us for a timely and interesting talk on State formation in post-Soviet de facto States. The University of Washington International Security Colloquium (UWISC) is the only academic colloquium devoted to international security in the Pacific Northwest. The Colloquium is interdisciplinary and open to the public and sponsors seven to nine domestic and international speakers, as well as speakers from UW faculty and students. 


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The Iranian Academy of Persian Language and Literature: Its History, Methodologies, and Debates

Middle East Center

Friday February 13, 2015
1:30--3:00 p.m.
Smith Hall, Room 306

Farhad Atai, University of Tehran

Persian and Iranian Studies Program

neareast@uw.edu


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Ancient Networks of the Indian Ocean

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Saturday February 14, 2015
9:30am - 11:00am
Asian Art Museum, Emma Baillargeon Stimson Auditorium, 1400 East Prospect Street, Seattle, WA 98112

Asian Art Museum

http://southasia.washington.edu/?p=751

What have new findings in archaeological, historical, and genetic studies revealed about the extensive early maritime relationships between Africa and Asia? Professor Chap Kusimba speaks on Indian Ocean economic and cultural networks, active for well over 1,500 years before the arrival of Europeans.

Kusimba, Chair of American University’s Department of Anthropology, was previously curator of African archaeology and ethnology at Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History. A former research scientist at the National Museums of Kenya, where his mentor was famed anthropologist Richard Leakey, Kusimba directs an active archaeological and ethnological research program in Kenya and Madagascar, as well as collaborative research programs in Nigeria, India, the Czech Republic, and China. An amazing discovery of a 600 year-old coin on an island off the coast of Kenya by an archaeological team he led made headlines internationally.


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Falling Oil Prices: China, Russia and the Gulf States

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Sunday February 15, 2015
4:00-5:30 p.m.
Seattle Metro Chamber of Commerce 1301 Fifth Ave, Ste 1500

Samantha Paxton, samanthap@seattletradealliance.com

Featuring

Dr. David Bachman
Henry M. Jackson Professor of International Studies, University of Washington

Mr. Derek Norberg
President, Council for U.S.-Russia Relations
Executive Director, Russian American Pacific Partnership (RAPP)

Dr. Kristian Coates Ulrichsen
Associate Fellow, Middle East and North Africa Programme
Chatham House

Thursday, February 5, 2015
4:00pm-5:30pm

Seattle Metro Chamber of Commerce
1301 Fifth Ave, Ste 1500

Complimentary for members (including all UW faculty/staff) and students | $10 for non-members

Register at http://seattletradealliance.com/blog/?p=11898

For questions, contact Samantha Paxton/206.389.7319206.389.7319 / samanthap@seattletradealliance.com.

 


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City Dwellers: Contemporary Art from India

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Saturday August 30, 2014 to Sunday February 15, 2015
SAM Hours
Seattle Art Museum, 1300 1st Ave, Seattle WA

Various

Seattle Art Museum

http://seattleartmuseum.org/exhibitions/citydwellers

 Bollywood movie culture, venerated politicians, religious traditions, and art historical icons all contribute to the myriad of influences in contemporary urban Indian culture. The artists in this exhibition pay tribute to this multitude even as they introduce elements of irony, introspection, and critique.

Through their photography and sculpture, the artists negotiate diverse ideas and influences on contemporary Indian society—Hindu mythology, Bollywood movies, Indian and western art, and icons of everyday life in a global market economy. Many of the works are influenced as much by popular movie culture and the use of digital technology as by the conventions of religious ritual and street processions, traditional theater, and dance.

Come see the colorful, contradictory, and complex India of today through the works of some of the country’s leading artists.


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The Disappearing Future: Korean Literature during the Asia-Pacific War

East Asia Center

East Asia Resource Center

Jackson School Information

Japan Studies Program

Korea Studies Program

Tuesday February 17, 2015
3:30-5:00 pm
Thomson 317

Janet Poole

Center for Korea Studies

uwcks@uw.edu

 The future seems to disappear from Korean fiction written under late 1930s colonial fascist rule as a stream of protagonists wind their weary way through a repetitive daily life, dreaming of past glories or present escapes. Critics at the time noted the widespread phenomenon of nostalgia and the craze for reading the classics; revolutionaries struggled to imagine a transformed, and postcolonial, society; and all writers had to confront the shrinking space of publication for printed letters and the demand to write in the imperial language, Japanese. Yet what forms of time come to the fore when the future seemingly disappears and what does this suggest about modernism in the Japanese empire and in a global fascist moment?


Janet Poole teaches Korean literature and cultural theory at the University of Toronto. Her exploration of Korean modernist writers’ response to Japanese fascist occupation during the Pacific War recently appeared as When the Future Disappears: The Modernist Imagination of Late Colonial Korea (Columbia University Press, 2014). She has translated the works of many writers from colonial Korea, including a collection of anecdotal essays published during the Pacific War by Yi T'aejun, Eastern Sentiments (Columbia University Press, paperback edition, 2013), and a bilingual edition of Ch’oe Myŏngik’s melancholic elegy to interwar Pyongyang, Walking in the Rain (ASIA Publishers, 2015). 


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The State in the Service of the Poor: the Politics, Past and Present of Social Protection in Egypt

Middle East Center

Tuesday February 17, 2015
12:30 --1:20 p.m.
Gowen 1B

Hania Sholkamy, Yale Carnegie Senior Scholar and Associate Professor, American University in Cairo

Middle East Center

mecuw@uw.edu

Presenter: Hania Sholkamy is a 2014-15 Carnegie Senior Scholar at Yale University; and she is an Associate Professor, Social Research Centre, American University in Cairo. Her publications include "Women Are Also Part of this Revolution," in The Arab Spring in Egypt, edited by Bahgat Korany & Rabab El-Mahdi (Oxford, 2012).


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A River Flows Through It: Transboundary Waters in China-India Relations

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Thursday February 19, 2015
3:30pm
Allen Auditorium of Allen Library

UW South Asia Center, East Asia Center, & China Studies Program

http://southasia.washington.edu/?p=750

Dr. Selina Ho’s research focus is on politics and international relations, with an area specialty in China Studies. She is most interested in water as a strategic resource, and has worked on China’s municipal water sector and transboundary river policies. A senior research fellow at Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, she is currently working on a comparative study of public goods provision in China and India, focusing specifically on the municipal water sectors in both countries.


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The Origins of Property Rights: from Monkeys to Modern Society

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday February 20, 2015
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Room 447 William H. Gates Hall

Professor Masanobu Kato, Nagoya Gakuin University

Sponsored by the Asian Law Center

For more information contact asianlaw@uw.edu

Professor Masanobu Kato is considered to be one of Japan’s leading civil code scholars. His works in Product Liability, Torts, Unjust Enrichment and Financial Leasing Contracts are regarded as definitive treatises in Japan. In addition, he has authored books and articles in commercial law, civil procedure, international transactions, intellectual property, labor, administration, tax, environmental, American, and Chinese law. Professor Kato is also well known for authoring a series of five civil code textbooks entitled: “Contemporary Civil Code System of Japan," and is planning to release the sixth and final volume “Family Law.”

 

RSVP asianlaw@uw.edu

 


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Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Friday February 20, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Yoav Dumam, UW Political Science Graduate Student

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

"Bolstering the National Project: Competitive Nation Building and Immigration in Israel and Quebec" Faculty Discussant: Kathie Friedman , Jackson School UW 


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African Elites in India

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Saturday February 21, 2015
9:30am - 11:00am
Asian Art Museum, Emma Baillargeon Stimson Auditorium 1400 East Prospect Street, Seattle, WA 98112

http://southasia.washington.edu/?p=754

Africans in India crossed the social spectrum from enslavement to princes. Kenneth X. Robbins explores the role of Africans as Indian sultans, nawabs, strongmen, generals, and elite court figures, as documented through the study of paintings, architecture, and artifacts.

Robbins is a collector and scholar, who edited the book African Elites in India and co-curated a New York Public Library Schomburg Center exhibit that has traveled internationally.


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The Wind in the Bamboo: Indigenous People of African Appearance

Center for Human Rights

Center for Global Studies

Southeast Asia Center

Tuesday February 24, 2015
6:30 - 7:30 pm
Thomson 101, University of Washington, Seattle Campus

Presenter/Author: Edith Mirante

Sponsored by: JSIS: Southeast Asia Center, Center for Human Rights and Center for Global Studies

Contact: seac@uw.edu

Indigenous Asian hunter-gatherers of ancient ancestry, once defined as a separate “Negrito race” due to their African appearance (dark skin, curly hair) survive in the Philippines, Malaysia and India. Author/activist Edith Mirante reveals their contemporary lives and challenges with a slide show based on her new book about her journeys to meet them.

About the book: “The Wind in the Bamboo: A Journey in Search of Asia’s ‘Negrito’ Indigenous People” reveals the plight of tribal Asians who were classified as a separate race and considered doomed to vanish. Defined as “Negrito” because they physically resemble small Africans, they may be descended from a first wave of migration out of Africa to Asia in prehistoric times. Called “savage pygmies” and “hideous dwarfs,” sold into slavery, exhibited at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, nearly exterminated by disease and a cataclysmic volcano, these extraordinary people now survive as forest hunter gatherers in only a few places: mainland Malaysia, the Philippines and India’s remote Andaman Islands. Some are still armed with spears and blowpipes, a few with cellphones and graduate degrees. They were subjected to the Victorian camera’s eye and the calipers of craniometry, and now strands of their DNA are analyzed for clues to early human migrations.


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On Reading Culture in the Making

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Thursday February 26, 2015
3:30pm
HUB145

http://depts.washington.edu/text/

 Priya Joshi is Associate Professor of English at Temple University and founding director of the New India Forum. She received her Ph.D. with distinction in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University in 1995.

Professor Joshi is the author of In Another Country: Colonialism, Culture, and the English Novel in India (New York: Columbia University Press, 2002; New Delhi: Oxford

University Press, 2003). The book is a cultural history of the consumption and production of the English novel in nineteenth- and twentieth-century India. Professor Joshi is currently completing another book-length project entitled Crime and Punishment: Nationalism and Public Fantasy in Bollywood Cinema in which she studies popular Hindi film and the fabrication of national identities in postcolonial India.

Professor Joshi's research and teaching interests include imperialism and its legacies, narrative and postcolonial theory, history of the book, the modern novel, popular Hindi film, and nationalism. Her research has been supported extramurally by fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Institute for Indian Studies.

The series "Histories and Futures of Reading" is sponsored by the Simpson Center for the Humanities, the Textual Studies Program, the Departments of English, Comparative Literature, Communication, Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies, French & Italian Studies, Asian Languages & Literature, the South Asia Center, the Hilen Endowment, and Modern Language Quarterly.


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Fredrik Logevall: Obama and the World in Historical Perspective

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

Thursday February 26, 2015
7-8:30 p.m.
Kane Hall Room 210

Fredrik Logevall

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Center for Global Studies

jsis@uw.edu

Fredrik LogevallFredrik Logevall is the Stephen and Madeline Anbinder Professor of History at Cornell University, where he serves as vice provost for international affairs as well as director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies.

He is the author or editor of nine books, most recently Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam (Random House, 2012), which won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History and the 2013 Francis Parkman Prize, awarded by the Society of American Historians to the book that “exemplifies the union of the historian and the artist.” It also received the 2013 American Library in Paris Book Award and the 2013 Arthur Ross Book Award from the Council on Foreign Relations.

Logevall’s commentary has been featured on CBS, BBC, CNN International, and National Public Radio, and his reviews and essays have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Politico, and Foreign Affairs, among other publications. He is immediate past president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations.


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The Dream of a Muslim Mikado: India, Japan and the Global Campaign for Islam

East Asia Center

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

Japan Studies Program

Middle East Center

South Asia Center

Friday February 27, 2015
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Thomson Hall 101 University of Washington, Seattle

UW South Asia Center

http://southasia.washington.edu/?p=742

In recent years, UCLA Professor Nile Green has focused on positioning Islam and Muslims in global history through such topics as intellectual and technological interchange between Asia and Europe; Muslim global travel writings; the transnational genealogy of Afghan modernism; and the world history of ‘Islamic’ printing. He has also used the networks forged by Sufi brotherhoods to understand pre-modern and early modern mechanisms of Muslim expansion from the Middle East to China and beyond. One hallmark of his writing has been to join together the study of the early modern and modern periods, not least with regard to the question of multiple globalisms and globalizations.


A reception in Thomson Hall 317 will follow Dr. Green’s talk.


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A Moveable Feast: Sufi Festivals from the Silk Road to the Indian Ocean

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Saturday February 28, 2015
9:30am - 11:00am
Asian Art Museum, Emma Baillargeon Stimson Auditorium, 1400 East Prospect Street, Seattle, WA 98112

http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/visit/calendar/events?EventId=31781

Celebrating the death of a Sufi saint as a joyful marriage to God, the 'urs or 'saintly wedding' is one of the most important yet little-known festivals of the Muslim world. Originating in the Persian cities of the medieval Silk Road, in the following centuries the 'saintly wedding' spread to India and, from there, across the ocean to Africa and Southeast Asia. Richly illustrated, this lecture follows the travels of the 'urs festival through the changing cultural landscapes that it connected over its thousand year journey.

Nile Green, Professor of History, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), has written extensively on Muslim interactions with non-Muslims, the western Indian Ocean and the spread of Sufism. His books include Bombay Islam: The Religious Economy of the West Indian Ocean, 1840–1915 (2011); Sufism: A Global History (2012, reprinted 2013), and the forthcoming Terrains of Exchange: Global Economies of Islam (2015).


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Kunta Kinteh Island

African Studies Program

Saturday February 28, 2015
6:30pm
Seattle Art Museum

Kunta Kinteh Foundation

Seattle Art Museum

The Kunta Kinteh Family Foundation is pleased to announce that as part of our screening tour, we will be presenting the film “Kunta Kinteh Island Coming Home Without Shackles” at the Seattle Art Museum on February 28, 2015. It chronicles the journey of Kunta Kinteh, whose life inspired the book and American TV miniseries “Roots.”

For more information you can visit:

http://kuntakintehvillage.org/family-foundation/http://www.kuntakintehislandmovie.com/
https://www.crowdrise.com/kuntakintehfamilyfoundation/fundraiser/

Tickets - $95 http://kuntakintehisland.eventbrite.com/
Reduced price for UW students: $50


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March 2015

FIGHTING THE NATURAL RESOURCE CURSE: WOMEN ACTIVISTS ON THE FRONTLINES

African Studies Program

Center for Human Rights

Center for Global Studies

Monday March 2, 2015
6:00 PM
Thomson 101, University of Washington, Seattle Campus

Oxfam America, Seattle Oxfam Action Corp, Center for Human Rights, Center for Global Studies, African Studies, Law, Societies & Justice, Evans School of Public Affairs

Contact: Ben Wiselogle at benwiselogle@outlook.com or 206.949.8635

Please join us on Monday, March 2nd in Thomson Hall room 101 to celebrate International Women’s Day by hearing personal stories of resilience and social change from two amazing women activists from Ghana. Please join Oxfam America, Seattle Oxfam Action Corps, and UW Center for Human Rights in welcoming these dedicated community activists.

This is an excellent opportunity to interact with women leaders who are on the front lines of the battle for fair and equitable land rights. You will have the opportunity to learn firsthand how these women have fought to prevent their community’s valuable resources from leaving their nation.

Panelist Biographies:
Hannah Owusu‐Koranteng‐Deputy Executive Director, Wassa Association of Communities Affected by Mining (WACAM)‐Ghana
Hannah is an Agriculturist / Environmentalist with a Diploma in Horticulture from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi and an M.A. in Environmental Management and Policy from the University of Cape Coast. Hannah held the position as technical officer and Subject Matter Specialist on Women Farmers for 18 years with the Ghanaian Ministry of Food and Agriculture. Following her time at the Ministry, she worked with the General Agricultural Workers’ Union as a Project Coordinator of the Rural Workers’ Program. As a worker of the trades union, she served as a member of the ILO Task Force on Informal Workers and was a part of the drafting Committee on Informal Economy and Decent work at the 90th ILO meeting in Geneva. Hannah is a founding Member of Wacam, a mining advocacy NGO in Ghana. She worked with Wacam as a Volunteer and member of the Executive Council since its official launch in 1998. Hannah took up a permanent appointment with Wacam in 2003 as the Deputy Executive Director responsible for Training, Research, campaigns and project implementation. She has been working on transparency issues in Ghana since 2003 and was nominated to represent civil society organizations on the Ghana Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) Secretariat in 2010 (Biography courtesy of Oxfam America).

Joanna Manu is a farmer, community activist, and District Assembly representative from southwest Ghana. Beginning in 2004, Joanna and other local farmers raised their voices when a mining company spilled cyanide into the river that supplies fresh drinking water to the village of Dumasi. Working with Oxfam’s partner WACAM, Joanna trained to fight for her community’s rights in the face of the power of Ghana’s extractive industries and has since fought to stop land grabs and pollution in both Ghana’s court system and the Ghana Environmental Protection Agency. Joanna was elected to District Assembly in 2011 and continues to work tirelessly for her community, citing the importance of courage, confidence, and understanding in changing the world and the lives of those around her (Biography courtesy of Oxfam America).


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An Investigation of the 'Political Theology' of the Muslim Brotherhood

Middle East Center

Tuesday March 3, 2015
12:30 --1:20 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Sarah Eltantawi

Middle East Center

mecuw@uw.edu

Presenter: Sarah Eltantawi is an Assistant Professor in Comparative Religion at Evergreen State College.  Part of the "New Voices on the Middle East" series introducing new faculty experts on the Middle East.


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Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Tuesday March 3, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Michael Albertus, University of Chicago

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Grad Student Discussant: David Lopez, UW Political Science 


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Beat Nation: Spoken Word, Music, and Civic Participation in Canada

Canadian Studies Center

Friday March 6, 2015 to Sunday March 8, 2015

Lake Chelan, Washington

Paulette Thompson, K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate

Canadian Studies Center

Canada@uw.edu

What is the role of protest in a democracy? From banging pots and pans in the streets of Montreal to civil disobedience against the Kinder- Morgan pipeline, Canadians of all stripes are making themselves heard regarding contested issues. In this session we'll explore works by Canadian artists concerning these various struggles and discuss parallels and differences between Canadian and U.S. contexts. 

More information: http://www.wscss.org/chelan-conference-and-retreat/

 


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Calligraphic Abstraction. Modern Art in Asia, the Middle East and Africa

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Saturday March 14, 2015
9:30am - 11:00am
Asian Art Museum, Emma Baillargeon Stimson Auditorium, 1400 East Prospect Street, Seattle, WA 98112

http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/visit/calendar/events?EventId=31783

In the post World War II era, the political decolonization of Asia and Africa was accompanied by new aesthetic developments. Artists from North Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia reworked Arabic calligraphic motifs in entirely new ways, by bringing its form in productive dialogue with transnational modernism and abstraction.

Iftikhar Dadi, Associate Professor of Art History and Chair of Art Department, Cornell University, is an artist and art historian broadly interested in the relation between art practice in the contexts of globalization, urbanization, and mediatization. He has authored numerous scholarly works, including the recent book Modernism and the Art of Muslim South Asia. Curatorial activities include Lines of Control at Duke University's Nasher Museum of Art and Cornell's Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, and Unpacking Europe at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam.


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Sephardic Highlight at the Seattle Jewish Film Festival

Jewish Studies Program

Sunday March 15, 2015
TBD
TBD

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

 Annual Sephardic-focused programming at the Seattle Jewish Film Festival. Time and location still to be determined.

 

More information can be found at: jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/


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Everybody Was Kung Fu Fighting: Afro-Asian Worlds since WWII

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Saturday March 28, 2015
9:30am - 11:00am
Asian Art Museum, Emma Baillargeon Stimson Auditorium, 1400 East Prospect Street, Seattle, WA 98112

http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/visit/calendar/events?EventId=31785

Cultural and political interactions between African and Asian diasporas during and after decolonization are discussed by historian and journalist Vijay Prasad. These interactions have included exchange of cultural and religious symbols, appropriated personas and lifestyles, and working together to achieve political change.

Vijay Prashad, Chair in South Asian History and Professor of International Studies, Trinity College; journalist and commentator; author of The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South (2014). His 2001 book Everybody was Kung Fu Fighting: Afro-Asian Connections was named a Favorite Book by the Village Voice. His sixteen published books also include The Darker Nations: A People's History of the Third World (2007), Arab Spring, Libyan Winter (2012), and Uncle Swami: Being South Asian in America (The New Press and HarperCollins, June 2012). Forthcoming books include Letters to Palestine. Writers Respond to War and Occupation (2014), and as co-editor, Land of Blue Helmets: The UN in the Arab World (University of California Press, 2015).


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Welcome Reception and Lecture by Prof. Mika Ahuvia

Jewish Studies Program

Tuesday March 31, 2015
7:00 pm
Hillel UW - 4745 17th Ave NE

Prof. Mika Ahuvia

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

 More information can be found at: jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/


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April 2015

Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Friday April 3, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Nahomi Ichino, University of Michigan

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Grad Student Discussant: Daniel Yoo, UW Political Science
 


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Active Defense: Explaining the Evolution of China's Military Strategy

China Studies Program

Friday April 17, 2015
12:00 p.m.
Olson Room--Gowen Hall

Taylor Fravel, Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachussets Institute of Technology

cgreed@uw.edu


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Yoni ki Baat: A South Asian "Vagina Monologues" Adaptation

Jackson School Information

South Asia Center

Friday April 24, 2015 to Sunday April 26, 2015

Asian Art Museum

http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/visit/calendar/events?EventId=31896

 This always-popular performance features poignant and vivid monologues by courageous South Asian women. Every year is an entirely new production and cast!

Presented by Tasveer as part of the Aaina Festival's 10th anniversary. Performances are Friday, April 24 through Sunday, April 26. A reception follows the performance on Saturday, April 25. Check link below for performance times.


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Mitsubishi Corporation Lecture Series 2014-15: Change in Japanese Entrepreneurship: the Case of ORIX

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Monday April 27, 2015
7:00 - 8:30 PM
Kane Hall 220

Yoshihiko Miyauchi, Senior Chairman of ORIX Corporation

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Mitsubishi Corporation

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

A look at the changing Japanese corporation and entrepreneurship from WWII to present day. Japanese business icon and ORIX corporation senior chairman Yoshihiko Miyauchi demonstrates the changes in entrepreneurship through a close examination of ORIX's experience from the post-war high economic growth period to the bubble burst of the early 1990s, and as shaped by current 'Abenomic' policies and global economics.Yoshihiko Miyauchi is the Senior Chairman of the Orix Foundation, and until recently was CEO of the Orix Corporation – one of Japan's largest leasing and leading diversified financial services conglomerate in 24 countries worldwide.

Miyauchi received a BA from Kwansei Gakuin University in 1958, followed by an MBA in 1960 from the University of Washington. In addition to being one of Japan's top corporate leaders, Miyauchi is a strong advocate of regulatory reform and serves as president of the Council for Promoting Regulatory Reform, an advisory board to the prime minister of Japan.

Free and open to the public


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May 2015

Trans-Pacific Networks of Japanese Immigrant Settler Colonialism, 1919 -1940

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday May 1, 2015
3:30-5:00 PM
Communications Room 120

Eiichiro Azuma, University of Pennsylvania

Co-sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and the Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest with support from the Departments of American Ethnic Studies and History

For more information please contact japan@uw.edu

Professor Azuma sheds light on how deeply the history of prewar Japanese America was intertwined with that of Japanese imperialism. Inspired by the success of British colonialism in its settler colonies, many Japanese migrant ideologues and practitioners of national expansion embraced a popular notion of frontier conquest with the American West as a key prototype. This talk will highlight one example of such an intersection between Japan’s state endeavors to colonize new territories and the experiences of migrant resettlers from the American West.

Eiichiro Azuma is Alan Charles Kors Term Chair Associate Professor of History and Director of Asian American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Between Two Empires: Race, History, and Transnationalism in Japanese America (Oxford, 2005), which received four book prizes. Azuma also coedited, with Gordon Chang of Stanford University, Yuji Ichioka, Before Internment: Essays in Prewar Japanese American History (Stanford, 2006). Currently, he is working on two book projects while co-editing the Oxford Handbook of Asian American History with David Yoo (UCLA). 


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Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Tuesday May 5, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Aaron Erlich, UW Political Science Graduate Student

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Faculty Discussant: Scott Radnitz 


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Persian and Chagatay Influences on the Kyrgyz Oral Traditions: The Poetry of Moldo Kylych (d. 1917) and Togolok Moldo (d. 1942)

Middle East Center

Friday May 22, 2015
1:30-3:00 p.m.
Smith Hall, Room 306

Jipar Duishembieva

Persian and Iranian Studies Program

neareast@uw.edu


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Mitsubishi Corporation Lecture Series 2014-15: Rising China and Japanís Future: Seeking a Way to Co-Exist

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Thursday May 28, 2015
7:00 - 8:30 PM
Kane Hall 220

Ryosei Kokubun, President of the National Defense Academy of Japan

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Mitsubishi Corporation

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

Japan and China have been facing a variety of difficult challenges since the second half of 1990s, particularly in the past ten years. In contrast to most analyses that focus on power shift theory, Professor Kokubun will discuss the domestic factors of politics in the two countries.

Ryosei Kokubun is president of the National Defense Academy of Japan and Executive Vice President of the National Institute for Research Advancement (NIRA). He taught law and politics at Keio University until 2012, where he was dean and faculty of the Graduate School of Law and Politics. His research topics focus on international relations in East Asia with a particular focus on China-Japan relations. Check back for more information closer to the event date.

Free and open to the public

 


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June 2015

STUDY CANADA Summer Institute - Across the Salish Sea: Canada-US Connections in the Pacific Northwest

Canadian Studies Center

Monday June 22, 2015 to Friday June 26, 2015

Seattle, WA to Victoria, BC

Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada, Canadian Studies Center, UW, and Canadian American Center at Western Washington University

canada@uw.edu

The US today faces unprecedented demand for globally competent citizens and professionals. To this end, U.S. Department of Education Title VI grants support language training programs and area studies, including Canada, so that students learn more about the world and transnational trend. The U.S.D.O.E.-designated Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada offers the STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators annually to provide American educators with an excellent foundation for teaching about our vital political, economic, environmental and cultural relationships with Canada. For more than 35 years, teachers from every state have learned about core social studies topics related to Canada—such as geography, history, government, and economics—from university faculty and other experts. Important outcomes have always included gaining global perspectives of civic issues, receiving numerous resources for classroom use, and developing curricula that meet Common Core, C3 and state standards.

Registration opens November 1, 2014 and closes May 1, 2015 (or earlier, if maximum of 20 reached). See attached handout for additional details, visit www.k12studycanada.org/scsi.html for latest updates,​ or contact tina.storer@wwu.edu for further information. Flyer and registration info 


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