Focus on the Arctic

The Center for Global Studies is excited to sponsor a number of Arctic and International studies activities which explore the Arctic as a new frontier in foreign policy with political, military, economic, social, and environmental implications. Explore below various features by UW students and faculty, and check back in for more!

The Center for Global Studies is excited to sponsor a number of Arctic and International studies activities which explore the Arctic as a new frontier in foreign policy with political, military, economic, social, and environmental implications. Explore below various features by UW students and faculty, and check back in for more!

Be sure to explore our featured issue of the Arctic and International Relations Series. This latest issue addresses how Arctic Indigenous people organize economically – a new frontier in international relations. Limited hard copies are also available at canada@uw.edu.

In our video series, experts from various disciplines fielded UW students’ questions on issues such as traditional indigenous  knowledge and law, exploration, geological exploration, climate change, and economic and social development.

Also featured is a faculty led field study by Dr Fritz Wagner, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Urban Design and Planning and an affiliate in the Canadian Studies Program, and also by Dr. Regent Cabana, an Affiliate Professor (from New Orleans), in association with the Canadian Studies Program in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. The class explored  three Canadian cities: Montreal, Québec City and Ottawa.

Read about our June 2017 workshop, “Sami Role in Arctic Affairs: Politics, Research and Activism,” where experts from across the Arctic, many of them  Sámi themselves, spoke on reclaiming Sámi identities, and the struggle for the Sámi right to survival and well-being.

Don’t forget to scroll down for an essay series of articles by scholars and students from UW’s International Policy Institute, which were featured in UW News! This is a 13-part series of blogs exploring aspects of the intergovernmental Arctic Council as a 21st-century institution.

While the effects of climate change pose new challenges in the Arctic, melting ice and warmer temperatures also present economic opportunities. In the our podcast from World Policy on Air, Inuuteq Holm Olsen, the first Greenland representative at the Danish embassy in Washington, explains how the semi-autonomous nation is working to balance an emerging tourism industry and natural resource extraction with environmental sustainability.

Also check out a description of a class that began in Winter Quarter 2017, where UW’s Professor Bob Pavia taught an innovative course jointly offered by the Honors Program and the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies – a look at climate change from a truly international perspective. The new course, ARCTIC 391/JSIS 391/HONORS 394 Climate Change – An International Perspective: Science, Art and Activism, brought together students from across disciplines including international studies, engineering, political science, environmental design, art, accounting, and biology.