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[February 22-24] Small Island Big Song Returns: Panel, Workshops, and Live Concert

January 12, 2024

The most heartfelt and evocative sounds imaginable. — Roots World, US

Here you will hear those who sing for the seas.

From Taiwan to Aotearoa/New Zealand – Madagascar to Rapa Nui/Easter Island.

Islanders who share an ancient seafaring ancestry and language.

Over three years, Small Island Big Song evolved from visits to 16 Island Nations, and work with over 100 artists, solo artists, elders, community groups, and grassroots musicians, all recorded in their homelands in nature using traditional instruments and languages, with each contributing to each other’s songs. The result is a surprising and stunning musical collaboration reuniting the distant yet interconnected musical traditions of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. In 2018, the collaboration launched its fair trade and climate action-driven project through social, audio, film, and performance content on a global scale.


Small Island Big Song Live Concert

Feb 24, 2024 (Sat) at 8 PM | Meany Hall – Katharyn Alvord Gerlich Theater

Get your tickets here: https://meanycenter.org/tickets/2024-02/production/small-island-big-song

Small Island Big Song celebrates the seafaring cultures of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. This immersive concert features Indigenous musicians from as far afield as Taiwan, Papua New Guinea, Madagascar, Mauritius, Australia, and Rapa Nui (Easter Island), all with their own unique musical lineages. From oceanic grooves and  soulful island ballads, to contemporary styles of roots, reggae, R&B and grunge, they unite as one voice  to make a powerful musical statement from a region on the frontline of the climate crisis.


UWAA Panel Climate Change: Our Role as Artivists

Feb 22, 2024 (Thu) | 4 – 6 pm | UW Walker Ames Room

RSVP required; open to UW alum, faculty, staff, students, and broader community

https://www.washington.edu/alumni/events/climate-crisis-our-response-as-artivists/

As the climate crisis quickly rises to the top of world concerns, different sectors — including artists — scramble to figure out ways to respond to its impending pressures. We all have a vital role to play. Join the conversation as we explore ways we can use our voices to push the needle on political, economic, social and cultural questions at the root of this global concern.

 


Drumming Papuan Garamut Workshop (Ages 13+, No experience necessary)

Feb 23, 2024 (Fri) | 12 – 1 pm | Room 209,  University Heights Center (click HERE for map)

RSVP required. Visit bit.ly/3vCB7Tp to register.

Mea Joy Ingram and her father Airileke will lead this drumming workshop, teaching some of the basic rhythms on their Garamut (Papuan log drum). Aremistic, a master percussionist from Tahiti, will also join in to share Tahitian rhythms on To’ere (Tahitian log drum). Whether it is the Tahitian To’ere, the Fijian Lali, the Vanuatuan Tamtam, the Cook Island Pate or the Papuan Garamut, a tradition of slit log drums reverberates across our “Sea of Islands” from one end of the Pacific to the other.

 

 


Dancing Mauritian Sega Workshop (All-ages, Family Friendly)

Feb 23, 2024 (Fri) | 2:30 – 3:30 pm | Room 209,  University Heights Center (click HERE for map)

RSVP required. Visit bit.ly/48EFpIe to register.

Get ready to sweat and have some fun while learning Sega Dance from Mauritius with drumming accompaniment by Small Island Big Song artists. Dance is a form of storytelling that preserves cultural memory and history. Sega is both the national dance of Mauritius and a profound artistic embodiment of the historical and cultural memory of colonial slavery. It is a testament to the strength of the human spirit and the capacity to create and express beauty and joy out of nothing. Led by Mathieu Joseph, one of Mauritius’ best choreographers of the young generation.