Hellenic Studies

Hellenic Studies Faculty

 

Alex Hollmann
Associate Professor of Classics, Current Program Chair and Vidalakis Family Endowed Professor of Culture, Excellence and Spirituality
PhD: Harvard University
Department of Classics
University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195

Alex Hollmann is an Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. He received his Ph.D. in Classical Philology from Harvard University in 1998.  Hollmann’s interests are generally in ancient Greek language and literature and in Greek religion. More specifically, I am interested in Greek literary prose, particularly the historian Herodotus. Another great interest of his is religion and magic. He is currently working on curse tablets on lead from ancient Antioch in Syria, several of which he has already published. He is collaborating with Prof. Robert Daniel of the University of Cologne on a project to publish these and other magical texts in Greek from the Eastern Mediterranean.

Heracles Panagiotides
Instructor of Modern Greek Language
PhD: Psychology, University of Washington
Cognitive Psychology, Language Learning
Jackson School of International Studies Box 353650
University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195

Taso LagosTaso G. Lagos
Program Director,
Greece Study Abroad Program
PhD: Communications, University of Washington
Political communication: written and visual
Jackson School of International Studies Box 353650
University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195

Taso G. Lagos is Foreign Studies Director for Hellenic Studies in the Jackson School of International Studies. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2004 and founded the Athens study abroad program the following year. His family emigrated to the United States from a tiny village on the Greek island of Euboea. He is affiliate lecturer at the University of Washington, where he specializes in Greek Cinema, Greek Diaspora, Digital Studies and International Communication. He is currently working on a biography of Alexander Pantages, a Greek-American immigrant and pioneer of early motion picture theater history. His published has appeared in the Journal of Modern Greek Studies, New Media & Society, Political Communication and in the book series, Culture & Civilization. His blog on all things Greek can be found here.

Nektaria Klapaki

Nektaria Klapaki
Acting Assistant Professor in Hellenic Studies
PhD: University of London
Jackson School of International Studies Box 353650
University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195

Nektaria Klapaki is Acting Assistant Professor of Hellenic Studies at the University of Washington. A graduate of the University of Crete (B.A. in Classics with distinction), and the University of London (M.A. and Ph.D. in Modern Greek Studies), she joined the University of Washington in 2010 as Alexander S. Onassis Visiting Assistant Professor, having previously held teaching appointments at the Norwegian Institute in Athens, the University of Thessaly, and the Hellenic Open University. Her research interests encompass the presence of epiphany in modern Greek and European literature; encounters of modernism and Hellenism; modern receptions of the classical heritage; modern travel literature, as well as issues of memory, gender and cultural nationalism. Her publications include invited and contributed articles on epiphany in modern Greek literature, on modern travel literature, on Greek modernism, and on the relationship between poetics and apophatic theology. Klapaki is currently working on a book-length comparative study of epiphany in nineteenth and twentieth-century Greek poetry.

Carol Thomas

Carol Thomas
Professor of Greek History, Former Director of the Program
PhD: Classics, Northwestern University
Greece from Prehistory – Present
Department of History, Box 353560
University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195

Greek history has been the center of my career since I began the study of ancient Greek and Latin in high school, then continued with Classics as a major in college, and added archaeology and art history in graduate study.  The 1970s were exciting for new evidence to understand the Greek “Age of Heroes” long thought to be a mythical creation of later Greece.  Tablets baked in the fires that destroyed the palaces of that “Age of Heroes” were being deciphered and, after completing my PhD,  I had the honor of working with one of the decipherers, Dr. John Chadwick.  That decipherment extended the history of Greece by several millennia, making it a contender for the world’s most durable culture.  Consequently, to explore that durability,  my recent interests have stretched to the study, teaching and research of Greece from 7000 BCE to the present.

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Joel Walker
Professor of Late Antiquity, Byzantine and Early Medieval History
PhD: History, Princeton University
Cultural and Political history, wider interaction of the Mediterranean sphere
Department of History, Box 353560
University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195

As a historian of late antiquity, I am interested in the diverse cultures of western Eurasia from prehistory to the early Islamic caliphate.  The rubric of late antiquity has allowed me to integrate some of my most abiding interests: the history and archaeology of the Classical world; early Christianity; and religion and society in the pre-Islamic and early Islamic Middle East.  At the undergraduate level, I offer lecture courses on the Ancient World (“Cavemen to Constantine”), the World of Late Antiquity, and the Byzantine Empire, as well as seminars on Jerusalem, the Empires of Ancient Iran, and animal-human relations in world history (“the cow course”).  My graduate seminars have explored these same general areas.  In addition to my position in the History Department since 1997, I have been an active member of the University of Washington’s Comparative Religion Program and its Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization.  Between 2012 and 2015, I served as the director of the University of Washington’s Program in Persian and Iranian Studies.