Arctic Studies Minor

Arctic Minor Courses – 2021-2022

The following courses are required courses for the Arctic Studies minor or fulfill elective requirements. This page will be updated as course offerings become available. For questions on courses, contact the Canadian Studies Center at canada@uw.edu.

FALL QUARTER 2021


ARCTIC 200: Indigenous Diplomacies and International Relations in the Arctic  **(3 cr.), T 2:30-5:20 p.m., Jason Young, Senior Research Scientist, UW Information School

This course introduces students to international relations in the Arctic, with an emphasis on understanding IR from the perspective of the region’s Indigenous peoples. Students will study dramatic environmental, economic, and social transformations in the Arctic; learn about emerging geopolitical issues; explore Indigenous perspectives on international relations in the Arctic; and challenge themselves to understand international frameworks through the lens of Indigenous knowledge systems.

ARCTIC 498: Conversational Inuktitut **(3 cr.), M/Th, 3:00-4:30 p.m., Alexina Kublu, former Languages Commission of Nunavut, Canada

This course will expand students’ knowledge of Inuktitut in the four areas of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will continue with Dialectology, finishing the tour of the Canadian dialects. Students will keep a journal in Inuktitut to help them use the language meaningfully. At the end of the course, students should be able to recognize different Canadian dialects, write on a range of subjects, be able to express their opinion in Inuktitut, and be able to hold conversations with native speakers.

OCEAN 497 E / OCEAN 506 E: Ocean Memory (3 cr.) T/Th, 3:30-4:50 p.m. Jody Deming, Karl M. Banse Endowed Professor, School of Oceanography

In this course, students will explore multidisciplinary aspects of the emerging line of inquiry called “ocean memory”, which has as its broadest goal to serve society by heightening human connectivity to the ocean through the immediately understandable concept of memory.  Human forms of memory — short-term, long-term, collective and cultural, can be applied to virtually every scientific discipline within oceanography, as can the triggering or priming of memory and the ultimate loss of memory.  Students will explore each of these aspects, both metaphorically and in scientific depth, with an expectation that new concepts and practices, not yet envisioned, will emerge from our collective immersion in this subject.

WINTER QUARTER 2021


ARCTIC 498: Conversational Inuktitut **(3 cr.), M/Th, 3:00-4:30 p.m., Alexina Kublu, former Languages Commission of Nunavut, Canada

The second course in the fourth-year Inuktitut language sequence.

SPRING QUARTER 2022


ARCTIC 498: Conversational Inuktitut **(3 cr.), M/Th, 3:00-4:30 p.m., Alexina Kublu, former Languages Commission of Nunavut, Canada

The third course in the fourth-year Inuktitut language sequence.

ARCTIC 391/JSIS B 391/HONORS 391: Climate Change: An International Perspective: Science, Art, and Activism (5 cr.), Robert Pavia, UW School of Marine and Environmental Affairs

This course explores the science of climate change in the context of social and political constraints. It further explores the role of art and activism in communicating climate impacts and mitigation options. Students will gain knowledge of key atmospheric and ocean science principles along with developing a greater understanding of contemporary issues in the context of Arctic nations and peoples. Students will develop skills for critically evaluating the popular portrayal of scientific concepts and their role in policy debates.


**This course is sponsored by the Canadian Studies Center and Center for Global Studies in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies with Title VI grant funding administered by the International and Foreign Language Education office in the Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education.