Media Collection

The Southeast Asia Center has a number of resources that are available to students, teachers and anyone interested in learning about Southeast Asia. You do not have to be a University of Washington affiliate to check out SEAC resources.

If you are interested in checking out any of above materials, please email Tikka Sears, the Southeast Asia Center's Outreach Coordinator.

* Especially recommended for K-12 educators

REVIEW indicates this video is reviewed on the Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS) website. Search for the video title and click on review.

By Country: BURMA | CAMBODIA | INDONESIA | LAOS | MALAYSIA | PHILIPPINES | SINGAPORE | THAILAND | VIETNAM

Alphabetically by Film Title: A-C | D-G | H-K | L-O | P-S | T-U | V-Z


BURMA

Beyond Rangoon 1998 (Drama: 100 min) John Boorman's portrayal of an American woman's personal transformation set in revolutionary (1988) Burma. The struggle between the Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy (NLD) and Burma's military regime is used as the backdrop in this dramatic film. The film is gripping and emotional. This film should not be used as a documentary of Burmese history: rather, it is an interesting film to use in order to discuss the perceptions of Asia in media.

Cross and Kalashnikov: The Unknown War in Burma 1993 (28 min) This extraordinary investigative report takes us into the jungles of Burma where a guerilla war has been waging for the last forty years. The Karen people, a Christian minority, have been fighting to retain their independence and culture. Often forced to flee before government forces, they quickly re-establish their camps and continue with their normal activities: educating their young people, training them for military service, keeping their weaponry ready, and obtaining food for survival. The "Kalashnikov" in the title refers to the Soviet-made weapon used by the Christian guerillas. Although a broad and complicated coalition has been forged against the tyrannical central government, the Karen have been driven from most of their bases on the border with Thailand. Cross and Kalashnikov gives viewers a better understanding of the zeal with which minority groups stand up for their independence.

Inside Burma: Land of Fear 1996 (52 min) REVIEW Nearly the size of Texas, with a population of more than 40 million, Burma has rich natural resources probably unequalled in Asia. Yet Burma is also a secret country. Isolated for the past 34 years, since a brutal military dictatorship seized power in Rangoon, this rich country has been relegated to one of the world's poorest, the assault on its people all but forgotten by the rest of the world. Award-winning filmmakers John Pilger and David Munro go under-cover to expose how the former British colony is ruled by a harsh, bloody and uncompromising military regime. More than a million people have been forced from their homes and untold thousands killed, tortured and subjected to slavery.

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CAMBODIA

* Asia: Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam 1996 (28 min) Progress versus culture, preserving archaeological sites, and rebuilding war-torn nations are featured in this program. A Frenchman and a Laotian are working together to improve the lives of local farmers in Laos by incorporating the farmers' opinions and cultural concerns. In Cambodia, efforts by the UN to preserve Angkor Wat, the famous archeological site and temple in Angkor, are detailed. In Vietnam, 62-year-old American Bob Sidell is helping the people of Dai Loc to rebuild infrastructures and generally improve their lives. A series of Our Developing World: Regional, Political, and Geography

* Asia Close Up: Japan/Cambodia 1996 (28 min) This film is part of the Children of the Earth series and is meant to show US children the different ways children live in other parts of the world. In the first segment, a day in the life of a thirteen-year-old Japanese schoolgirl is traced. The film emphasizes the value Japanese place on education, and also introduces traditional art forms such as ikebana and origami. The second segment follows the struggles of a young Cambodian boy who has lost his leg to a land mine. The film allows a rare view into rural Cambodian life in the aftermath of the country's genocidal civil war.

Cambodia: Year Ten 1993 (58 min, Documentary) This program shows the effects of the Khmer Rouge economic and political policies as resulting in mass murder, starvation and disease for the Cambodian people. The unlikely role of Communist Vietnam as invader and savior of Cambodia is examined.

Cambodian Court and Folk Dances 1986, Ministry of Culture, People's Republic of Kampuchea (PRK) Description not yet available

* Dancing Through Death: The Monkey, Magic & Madness of Cambodia (56 min) This is the story of Thavro Phim, who came of age under the Pol Pot regime and lost his father, brother, and grandfather to the blood thirsty Khmer Rouge. What kept him whole after the ordeal was his Buddhist faith and dedication to Cambodian classical dance where he performs the role of Hanuman, the magical white monkey. We follow Thavro from California to the Kingdom of Cambodia, a country still in turmoil, for a bittersweet reunion with his family and teachers. The film takes us back to the years 1975-79 when 90 percent of the dancers were executed or died of starvation or disease. Their story leads to Cambodia's Killing Fields, the refugee camps, and to Yale University's Cambodian Genocide Project which helps families access information about their loved ones. The film shows how Khmer children, whose parents survived Cambodia's darkest hour, are being taught in Cambodia and America to carry on their traditions for the sake of cultural survival.

* From Angkor to America: The Cambodian Dance and Music Project of Van Nuys, California 1984-1990 (37 min) Narrated by a teenage Cambodian American girl, this video chronicles the history of a community-based arts project striving to preserve Cambodian classical dance and music. This video includes performances of twelve dance pieces, including Cambodian New Year and weddings, as well as rehearsals and classes (with Khmer Classical Dance Songbook by Amy Catlin with Sam-Ang Sam and Chan Moly Sam). The video explains the historical roots and the religious basis for classical Cambodian dance and music. Filmed by Amy Catlin, et al and narrated by Pinthang Ouk.

* Khmer Court Dance 1992 (75 min) The first of its kind in content and quality, this videotape includes five dances in the Court dance tradition with examples of pure dance and dance drama. A brief, clear history of the tradition is also provided. Chan Moly Sam, dance director; John Bishop, video director; Sam-Ang Sam and Naomi Hawes Bishop, producers.

* The Last God King: The Life and Times of Cambodia's Sihanouk 1998 (2 parts, 58 min each) For over fifty years King Norodom Sihanouk has been a pivotal force in Cambodia's destiny, juggling the fate of his people. Now in remission from cancer, King Sihanouk looks back over the highs and lows of Cambodia's struggle for survival before, during, and after "the killing fields." In four exclusive interviews, the King looks back over fifty years of political intrigue. He has been accused of collaborating with Pol Pot, yet also hailed as a peacemaker who ended years of carnage. Intertwined with the King's words are the observations of everyday Khmers, academics, critics, princes and rivals, staff members and even the royal fortuneteller. Filmmaker James Gerrand who documented every phase of Cambodia's turmoil since the 1960's is a leading expert on that country's complex politics. This definitive profile draws on unique archival material.

The Tenth Anniversary Celebration in PRK 1989 The TV Kampuchea broadcast of the activities surrounding the tenth anniversary of the People's Republic of Kampuchea regime in 1989. It includes speeches by Heng Samrin and Tea Banh, a parade, and footage of boat races and fireworks.

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INDONESIA

* The Adventures of Wayan and the 3r's (15 min) K-6 This delightful new video is an entertaining way to introduce younger children to the three "R"'s and inspire creative class projects similar to those in the video. One day while playing, six-year old Wayan was upset to find plastic litter around his village on the island paradise of Bali. That night, the Shadow Puppet Master performed a play about a king who cleaned up his kingdom by learning to reduce, reuse and recycle garbage. Inspired by the play, Wayan leads an effort to cleanup his village by practicing the three "R's". To celebrate his success, he and his friends organized a surprise parade with decorated sticks and musical instruments they created from a discarded plastic.

* Asian Insight
Asian Insight is a series of six programs that explores the social, political, and cultural evolution of the various states that make up the Southeast Asian region. Our collection includes five videos, each of which focuses on Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand or the Philippines. These videos attempt to explain how foreign powers have historically contributed to a lack of identity and cohesiveness in the region. Includes discussion questions.

* Program Three: Indonesia (Part 1: 24 min; Part 2: 27 min) Indonesia includes some 3,000 islands, with a combined population of 125 million and is composed of people from more than 300 ethnic groups. Indonesia also has the largest Muslim population in the world. Historically, the region has always lacked unity, which is one of the reasons why Dutch were able to easily assert their rule as early as 1596. Economically, the Chinese were able to gain an even stronger foothold on Indonesia than the Westerners. By the time Bali fell to the Dutch at the beginning of the 20th century, Indonesian nationalism was beginning to find its voice. Perhaps the government's single most important objective today is to enable Indonesians to view themselves as one people.

Clara, or the Woman Who Was Raped (Drama) by Seno Gumira Ajidarma, read by UW-Bothell Human Rights Readers Theater, Bruce Kochis & Cristina Alfar. As a journalist and writer, Seno Gumira Ajidarma has published seven collections of short stories and novels, with many more published separately in newspapers and magazines. His stories are regularly among the winners of the KOMPAS short story competition, the largest Indonesian daily newspaper. He is known for his magical realism, and is best known for his collection SAKSI MATA (Eyewitness) about East Timor.

* Cry of the Forgotten Land 1995 (26 min) New Guinea is the second largest island on earth. It is home to a thousand distinct peoples and languages - one fifth of the world's total. Since the western half of the island was forcibly annexed by Indonesia in 1963, it has been off-limits to journalists. This film was made clandestinely, and it tells a story that Indonesia does not want the world to hear. The Moi live on the western tip of New Guinea. Like many of the island's peoples, they have hunted and gathered in the forest for forty thousand years. Today the Moi are engaged in a desperate struggle to halt the destruction of their homeland by international logging companies. This film carries their message of protest to the outside world. It also portrays New Guinea's unique cultures, landscapes, and wildlife.

* The Goddess and the Computer 1991 (58 min) For centuries, rice farmers on the island of Bali have taken great care not to offend Dewi Danu, the water goddess who dwells in the crater lake near the peak of Batur volcano. Outsiders have long considered the ritual an interesting but impractical way to grow crops, and development companies have spent millions trying to improve the ancient system. With the help of an ingenious computer program, anthropologist Steve Lansing and ecologist James Kremer have shown that the Balinese rice-growers have actually been practicing state of the art resource management by coordinating the irrigation and planting schedules of hundreds of scattered villages.

* Hello! From Around the World: BALI 1993 (18 min) REVIEW The Hello! From Around the World series is an award winning K-7 video series that introduces children to other children around the world. In the BALI video, children are introduced to daily life on the island of Bali, part of Indonesia. Children are introduced to traditional arts, dance, music and other aspects of Balinese culture. Silver Apple Award Winner of the National Education Film and Video Festival.

* Horses of Life and Death 1991 (25 min) This compelling documentary explores the concept of life and death and the role of the horse as a messenger between the human and spiritual worlds in Sumba, the last Indonesian island with a pagan majority. The film follows two major ceremonial events: a large-scale equestrian jousting battle held to celebrate fertility and the harvest, and an elaborate funeral ritual that concludes with a procession led by the dead man's own horse, which carries his soul off to the afterlife. By Laura Scheerer Whitney.

* Human Face of Indonesia Series 1987 (30 min each tape) This remarkable series focuses on the lives of five very different Indonesians. By putting their personal stories into the broader context of modern Indonesia, it presents an enthralling and informative picture of the country's life and culture. Made by Film Australia.

1. But I'll Always Continue to Write 1987 (30 min) Debra Yatim is a Djakarta newspaper reporter who works under great stress to bring the plight of Djakarta's low-income and poverty groups to her readers.

2. Journey to a New Life 1987 (30 min) Overcrowding is a major problem, so the Indonesian government has begun to move people to less-populated provinces.

3. Helping the People to Help Themselves 1987 (30 min) Doctors Billy Sinaga and Budi Rahaya serve the province of Nusa Tenggara Timur. They face the challenge of administering healthcare in poor, remote communities.

4. We Are Nothing Without the People 1987 (30 min) The governor of Nusa Tenggara Timur and his wife discuss their medical work for one of the poorest provinces and talk about the role of the military in Indonesia today.

5. Master of the Shadows 1987 (30 min) Bali is the most famous place in Indonesia. Can its traditional culture survive the pressures of tourism? The conflict between the old and the new is explored.

* Indonesia: Islands on Fire 1997(25 min) This gripping video documents the appalling human rights abuses in Indonesia and East Timor stemming from the July 1996 government crackdown, the worst in the three decades of General Suharto's military dictatorship. It highlights the courageous efforts of the opposition movement to bring democratic change to Indonesia and East Timor. The documentary also exposes how U.S. companies exploit Indonesian labor, in particular the US-owned Nike corporation. Scenes inside the factory and inside a typical factory worker's hovel are contrasted with towering skyscrapers and multinational businesses. The video is an excellent educational tool to inform and activate the public around the need to change U.S. labor practices overseas.

* Indonesia: Riding the Tiger (1995) REVIEW

1. Kings and Coolies (52 min) Centuries of Dutch rule have left a lasting imprint on Indonesian society. While the Dutch grew prosperous on Indonesia's wealth, the Indonesian people remained among the poorest of Southeast Asia. This program looks at the period of Dutch colonization and at Indonesia's struggle for independence, which began in 1942 with the Japanese invasion and the end of Dutch rule.

2. Freedom or Death (55 min) The Japanese promised freedom but brought cruelty and hardship to Indonesia. While providing the military training that enabled Indonesians to fight a revolutionary war against the Dutch, the Japanese also created a widespread network of control and surveillance that still exists today. This program examines the period of Japanese rule and visits a small community, or kampung to show the effects of its influence. When the nationalist movement finally won independence from the Dutch, it was the Japanese-trained army, not the people, who ruled the nation.

3. The New Order (53 min) Indonesia has never experienced an orderly transfer of power in its 40-year history as a nation. The bloody coup that led to President Suharto's rise to power in 1966 opened the door to economic development, fueled primarily by investment from the United States and Japan. After 25 years of Suharto's "New Order" rule, Indonesia is again approaching a period of uncertainty. Poised for another battle for succession, Indonesia finds itself trying to cope with the conflict that has emerged as the country moves from a religious society to one embracing a philosophy of economic growth at any cost.

* Max Havelaar 1976 (Drama: 160 min) Max Havelaar is a Dutch colonial officer posted to Lebak in western Java as Assistant Resident. From the 1859 novel Max Havelaar or the Coffee Auctions of the Nederlandsche Handel-Maatschappij by Multatuli (Edward Douwes Dekker). Directed by Fons Rademakers and starring Peter Faber, Sacha Bulthuis, Soesilaningrat, and Rima Melatie. English subtitles.

Minangkabau Houses and Toraja Architecture 1993 This videotape on structure and culture in Indonesia has two sections with slides and narration for each section. It was produced by the Audiovisual Anthropology Lab at the Department of Anthropology, University of South Carolina. The narration is in English.

Section 1: Minangkabau Houses-Minangkabau Identity (12 min) by Karl G. Heider. This section describes the traditional Minangkabau house with its dramatic upsweeping roof shape. The tape has many photographs of houses, but the pace is slow and the sound level is very low.

Section 2: The Construction of Culture: A Look at Toraja Architecture (15 min) by Caroline C. Vinel. This tape explains the role and significance of the spectacular houses of the Toraja people of Sulawesi, Indonesia. It provides excellent detail on the houses, ritual and practical uses in society, and historical perspective on changes in society reflected in the houses.

"Peacemaking": The Power of Non-Violence and East Timor (Jose Ramos-Horta) 1997 (92 min) In 1975, Indonesia invaded the tiny country of East Timor and brutally slaughtered 200,000 of its citizens - nearly a third of the total population. Since then, Jose Ramos-Horta has been a tireless champion for human rights and self-determination for his native East Timor, a former Portuguese colony. In 1996 he won the Nobel Peace Prize along with fellow countryman Bishop Carlos Belo for "work toward a just and peaceful solution" in East Timor. A passionate speaker, Ramos-Horta's unfailing commitment to peace shines through in every lecture. While his topics require deep reflection, he tempers his message with a wonderful sense of humor and a sharp political wit. This is a video of the Freeman Public Lecture given on November 12, 1997. The lecture was co-sponsored by the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies and the Carlton and Wilberta Savage Foundation.

Roundtable on Indonesia; University of Washington professors Daniel Lev and Saraswati Sunindyo, University of Washington, February 3, 1999

Thinking About Change in Indonesia: A Conversation with Goenawan Mohamad 1997 (58 min) Goenawan Mohamad is Indonesia's foremost journalist and human rights advocate. In 1967, he helped to establish the daily newspaper Harian Kami and in 1970 he founded the weekly news magazine Ekspres, which was shut down within a year for its criticism of the Indonesian government. Only a year later, Mohamad managed to put Tempo Magazine on the newsstands where it maintained a regular publishing schedule until the Suharto government banned it in mid-1994. He now publishes an Internet version of the magazine and contributes to the underground magazine Suart Independent, sponsored by the Independent Journalists Association, an organization that he helped form and now leads. At considerable personal peril, Goenawan Mohamad has continued to work to insure freedom of expression is guaranteed in Indonesia. He has organized the Institute for the Study of the Free Flow of Information and, along with other civil rights activists, has formed the Independent Monitoring Committee, which monitored the May 1997 Indonesian elections. His courageous contributions to the advancement of human rights were recognized in May 1997 by Harvard University who conferred upon him the Louis Lyons Award for Conscience, Integrity and Courage in Journalism, which is administered by the Nieman Foundation. This is a video is of the May 15, 1997 interview of Goenawan Mohamad by Dan Lev, Professor of Political Science at the University of Washington. It was produced in conjunction with the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Freedom of Expression Series.

* The Three Worlds of Bali 1981 (58 min) On the Indonesian island of Bali, the arts permeate almost every aspect of daily life. Art helps the Balinese create the balance they consider essential between the worlds of growth and decay, lest the illusory world they reside in be destroyed. The religion of Bali is a mixture of animism, Hinduism, and Buddhism, with a uniquely Balinese stamp. Gamelan music, wayang (shadow puppet) theater, dance and elaborately constructed offerings of foods and flowers all represent attempts to please the gods and placate the demons. In Balinese cosmology, demons are thought to dwell in the watery underworld, gods in the upper world, and human beings in the middle realm between the two. This film by Ira Abrams and Stephen Lansing examines rituals performed by the Balinese who manage to hold on to their culture while accommodating the masses of tourists who visit the island each year. The Odyssey Series.

Tobelo Marriage 1990 (106 min) An award-winning documentary about a marriage ritual among the Tobelo of North Halmahera, a Moluccan island of eastern Indonesia. The ritual includes a large-scale exchange of valuables that requires highly diplomatic negotiations, numerous ceremonies, and lengthy preparatory activities. But will the unexpected elopement of the bride and groom spoil everything? Produced by David Nijland, University of Leiden.

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LAOS

* Asia: Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam 1996 (28 min) Progress versus culture, preserving archaeological sites, and rebuilding war-torn nations are featured in this program. A Frenchman and a Laotian are working together to improve the lives of local farmers in Laos by incorporating the farmers' opinions and cultural concerns. In Cambodia, efforts by the UN to preserve Angkor Wat, the famous archeological site and temple in Angkor, are detailed. In Vietnam, 62-year-old American Bob Sidell is helping the people of Dai Loc to rebuild infrastructures and generally improve their lives. A series of Our Developing World: Regional, Political, Geography

* From Mulberry Leaves to Silk Textiles (43 min) This video presents the entire process of textile creation in Laos, from making silk from silkworms to the rich variety of Laotian weaving techniques and motifs. Produced by Douang Deuane Bounyavong, et al.

Kmhmu Folklife in America (22 min) Music of the Pii reed flute, Sqkuul mouth organ, toot flute and voice accompany still photographs of Kmhmu craftspeople making instruments, basketry, crafts, food. The video also shows rituals, dances, families together and more food. No narration. It was photographed in 10 cities in the U.S. which have Kmhmu communities, and was produced by the Smithsonian Institution Office of Folklife Programs.

Laos (35 min) A travelogue about two men who journey through Laos and Vietnam. Footage depicts the countryside and people working and playing. Non-English narrative, non-English subtitles.

The Lao Natasin Music and Dance Troupe (35 min) The Lao Natasin Music and Dance Troupe performing on stage at the Kennedy Center. The performance was sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. No narrative or explanation on the series of dances. Live traditional music by performers on stage accompanies the dances. Quality of the photography is only fair.

* Moving Mountains: The Story of Yiu Mien 1983 (72 min) This video is an intimate look at the Yiu Mien (Iu Mien), a group of Southeast Asian refugees who originally settled in the Pacific Northwest. In their previous lives in Laos, the Yiu Mien had lived in the mountains, and did not use cars or other modern technology. Their involvement with the CIA during the Vietnam War forced them to lose their homeland and flee as refugees to the US. This video is a dramatic portrayal of a people caught between worlds. Through the word of the elders and rare archival footage of the Yiu Mien in Laos, their culture is illuminated. The complex reality of their adaptation to life in America is illustrated in this video.

* Paj ntaub: Textile Techniques of the Hmong (40 min) This video profiles four Hmong women artists who now live in Providence, Rhode Island. A variety of Hmong textile techniques are introduced and explained; including cross-stitch embroidery, batik, reverse appliqu?, and story cloth snitcher. Hmong history and clips from life in the hills of Laos are included. Produced, written, filmed, and directed by Joyce Smith.

* Threads of Life 1993 (28 min) A vivid portrayal of Hmong gender roles in a mountainous Thai village illustrated by the production and use of hemp strings and cloth throughout life cycle events. This film addresses gender and kinship issues, social change and traditional crafts. In Hmong with English subtitles. Directed by Susan Morgan.

* Too Much Air to Breathe: A Lao Monk-Healer and His Community (28 min) Too Much Air to Breathe is a narrative of Lao Buddhist culture, from a 58-acre farm in rural Virginia. Told by Achan Bounmi and members of Wat Lao Buddhavong, the piece explores religious belief and practice in a Southeast Asian American community in the US. Contrasting images are woven into a visual tapestry, emphasizing the constant tension inherent in the community's efforts to "make the present from the past and the future from the present." Too Much Air to Breathe is the only broadcast quality documentary on Southeast Asian Americans filmed by a native-born cinematographer. A 60-page companion guide accompanies it, with discussion points for classroom use. The piece is designed as an interdisciplinary educational tool useful in many fields including Asian studies, anthropology, comparative religions, and migration or refugee studies.

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MALAYSIA

* Asian Insight
Asian Insight is a series of six programs that explores the social, political, and cultural evolution of the various states that make up the Southeast Asian region. Our collection includes five videos, each of which focuses on Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand or the Philippines. These videos attempt to explain how foreign powers have historically contributed to a lack of identity and cohesiveness in the region. Includes discussion questions.

Program Five: Malaysia (Part 1: 26 min; Part 2: 25 min) Like all the other Southeast Asian nations, Malaysia has a long history of foreign influence, including that of Western colonization. Today, although Indians constitute a portion of its ethnic makeup, its population consists primarily of Malays and Chinese whose deep-seated cultural differences and many different languages and dialects make them distrustful neighbors. The Malays resent the economic success of the Chinese, and the Chinese resent the Malays' ruling authority. As one expert sees it, Malaysia will not really succeed as a nation until every culture within it can appreciate the uniqueness of the other.

* The Delicate Balance (30 min) Malaysia is the world's biggest producer of rubber, palm oil and tin. Successful diversification into resource processing and export industries has made manufacturing a key economic sector. This video examines how Malaysia strives to maintain its racial harmony and promote economic growth. Profiles in Progress Series.

* Malaysia 1994 (20 min) The country of Malaysia is a land of many faces, forming a unique blend of people and cultures. Viewers will see how Malaysia can be thought of as two countries do to its geographic position, sitting between the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea. This program explores Malaysia from the coastal fishing villages to the remote communities in the Rain Forest. Viewers will meet the diverse people of Malaysia, and see how the cultural influences of India and China have affected Malaysian society. A Southeast Asia Today series.

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PHILIPPINES

* Asian Insight
Asian Insight is a series of six programs that explores the social, political, and cultural evolution of the various states that make up the Southeast Asian region. Our collection includes five videos, each of which focuses on Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand or the Philippines. These videos attempt to explain how foreign powers have historically contributed to a lack of identity and cohesiveness in the region. Includes discussion questions.

* Program Four: The Philippines (Part 1: 26 min; Part 2: 25 min) The Philippines is the only Asian nation that was a colonial outpost for two Western nations--Spain and the United States. Although people living in the remote mountain villages were unaffected by the arrival of Westerners, people living in the urban areas intermarried with the whites, producing a mixed race called the mestizos. The first revolution in modern Asia occurred in the Philippines in 1896, when Filipinos took up arms against their Spanish masters. After the US intervened, that nation acquired the Philippines as part of the treaty, leading to the wry observation that 300 years of the Inquisition was followed by 50 years of Hollywood.

Behind the Veil: Voice of Moro Women 1998 (20 min) Three decades of war have caused untold anguish to Bangsamoro women. But they have remained resolute and strong. Now they face a dilemma. War or Peace? War is bloody and costly. And peace does not always right old wrongs. As they contemplate their situation, Bangsamoro women hold onto Islam. The veil is the symbol of their commitment to their people and their way of life. It is the mark of their faith.

* The Lost Tribe 1993 (60 min) As far as the 26 members of the Tasaday knew, they and a few neighbors were the only people on Earth. The tiny tribe lived in caves, gathered wild food, used simple stone tools, wore only leaves, and never wandered far from their remote Philippine rain forest home. For them, the world of beyond did not exist--that is, until helicopters with government officials, reporters, and anthropologists began arriving. At least, that was the story, when they were hailed as the anthropological find of the century after their discovery in 1971. This NOVA program examines whether the story was a hoax, as many reputable anthropologists have claimed, a plot by the regime of Ferdinand Marcos and his Minister for Tribal Affairs to strip tribal people of their land--or whether, as other anthropologists claim, the absence of all agricultural words and metaphors from Tasaday speech, and their extraordinary sense of being at home in the jungle are not,, among other examples, proof that they are really a Stone Age tribe.

* The Golf War 1999 (39 min) Peasants in a beachfront community called Hacienda Looc have been tilling their land for generations. But, the Filipino government decided to follow a U.S. Agency for International Development-funded report that recommended the area instead be used for tourism. The government illegally sold the peasants' land to the Manila South-Coast Development Corporation (MSDC). To cover itself, the government later claimed that this fertile mountainous area and tropical paradise was not suited for agriculture. Fil-Estate Land, Inc. is working with the MSDC to develop the Hacienda Looc land into a four-course golf and tourist resort. When the peasants who live on the land learned of this takeover, they formed an organization called Umalpas-Ka, a chapter of the larger national peasant federation KMP. The developers are working in collusion with the military, as well as with national and local politicians. Meanwhile, three peasant opponents of the golf course construction have been killed. Consequently, many peasants have supported the New People's Army's offer to protect their families and their land.

* Philippines: The Price of Power 1986 (28 min) Grades 7+ This film explores the role of the Igorots, traditional Filipino farmers, in the events that led to the "People Power" revolution of 1986. Focusing on the Igorots' fight against a massive dam project, which threatened their lands and culture, their story becomes a microcosm of the country's situation at the time. The film shows how poverty, corruption, and a lack of political freedom had alienated growing numbers of Filipinos, ultimately leading to the fall of Marcos and the ascendance of Corazon Aquino.

Sisters and Daughters Betrayed 1996 (28 min) Sex trafficking is a global crisis of growing dimensions. Millions of women and young girls have been illegally transported from rural to urban areas and across national borders for the purpose of prostitution. This compelling video explores the social and economic forces that drive this lucrative underground trade, and the devastating impact it has on women's lives. A hopeful note is sounded by the actions of women's organizations working against sex trafficking in their native countries, including Nepal, Thailand, and the Philippines. National Educational Film Festival Award, American Psychological Association honoree, American Public Health Association honoree, Association for Asian Studies honoree.

* White Christmas 1993 (24 min) After "four hundred years in a convent and fifty years under Hollywood," Philippine culture can be a spectacle of Spanish and US colonial influences. Through the combination of Christmas icons, rituals and personal reflections, the filmmaker, Michael Magnaye offers a candid perspective on his homeland after five years abroad. White Christmas highlights the images of contemporary life in the Philippines rarely seen by US audiences. Produced by Michael Magnaye, 1994 Special Jury Award.

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SINGAPORE

* Asian Insight
Asian Insight is a series of six programs that explores the social, political, and cultural evolution of the various states that make up the Southeast Asian region. Our collection includes five videos, each of which focuses on Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand or the Philippines. These videos attempt to explain how foreign powers have historically contributed to a lack of identity and cohesiveness in the region. Includes discussion questions.

* Program Two: Hong Kong/Singapore (Part 1: 24 min; Part 2: 27 min) Founded by the Portuguese in 1557, Hong Kong offered a trade passage to China. Sought by other imperialists, the island was acquired by the British who needed it to facilitate their opium trade in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today, it is still a center of commerce, and as one interviewee in the program says, "Hong Kong is run in a business-like way in the interests of businessmen." Singapore is also a center of trade and tourism. An independent city-state with a multi-racial society, Singapore is striving to find its identity.

* Singapore 1994 (20 min) Singapore has the highest standard of living in Southeast Asia, virtually no crime, and guarantees all of its citizens a place to live. This program examines how the government of Singapore has worked to achieve these almost unheard of conditions for its citizens. Viewers will also see the Chinese, Hindu, Muslim, and British influence on aspects of daily life, from the strict penal system, to religious festivals, to the education of the citizens. A Southeast Asia Today series.

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THAILAND

* Asian Insight
Asian Insight is a series of six programs that explores the social, political, and cultural evolution of the various states that make up the Southeast Asian region. Our collection includes five videos, each of which focuses on Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand or the Philippines. These videos attempt to explain how foreign powers have historically contributed to a lack of identity and cohesiveness in the region. Includes discussion questions.

* Program Six: Thailand (Part 1: 26 min; Part 2: 25 min) A constitutional monarchy, Thailand is a nation in which religion permeates daily life, for the people revere the compassionate and ascetic life-style of the country's more than 200,000 Buddhist monks who represent the "Thai cultural ideal." In fact, key to understanding the Thai culture and perspective is understanding the people's feelings about Buddhism and the monarchy and the way in which each supports the other. But many changes are under way in Thailand, particularly Bangkok -- although, unlike other nations in this region, Thailand escaped colonial rule, and is quickly giving way to the lure of Westernization.

BBC Television Clips on Thailand's "Bloody May" 1992 (45 min) This videotape is a compilation of more than 12 news reports by the British Broadcasting Corporation on the violence in Bangkok in May of 1992, the worst political violence in Thailand in 20 years. The news reports include extensive footage of protestors and military police action, but also include interviews with analysts, academics and others for perspectives on political, economic and social context. Narrated in English. Picture quality varies.

* Candles for New Years (28.5 min) Video featuring anthropologist and ethnographer Jacquette Hill narrating a look at a group in Northern Thailand and their New Years preparation and celebration. The village in which Hill works is north of Chiang Mai, where the group works in migrant farming. The narrative discusses farm economy, relation of group to mainstream Thai society, and preparation for the New Year. High quality photography. Produced by Earlham College, Richmond, Ind.

* The Other Thailand (Documentary: 29 min) This video presents the southern area of Thailand; an area of rubber plantations, coconut palms, tin mines and mangroves. The majority of the people are Muslim and mosques dominate the skyline. Journey into Thailand series. Produced by Landmark Films.

One Way Ticket to Hualampong: Thailand's Market in Children 1982 (40 min) Non-VHS format.

One World: The Kingdom of Thailand (Description not available at this time)

Prostitute: A Factor to Nicdom This documentary film provides a brief sketch of the primary factors contributing to the increase of prostitution in Thailand. The film poses a number of questions about the Thai sex industry. Why does Thailand have the largest sex-for-hire industry in Asia? Who creates the image of Thailand as a sex stop for tourists? Why do women become prostitutes and what are their lives like? How do modernization and industrialization relate to the Thai sex industry?

Silent Danger (Drama: 40 min) Fictionalized account of young man in Thailand who becomes involved with drugs and the related AIDS epidemic. It was produced by the Drug Control and Suppression Office, Ministry of Health, Thailand and was funded by USAID. English subtitles.

Sisters and Daughters Betrayed (28 min) Sex trafficking is a global crisis of growing dimensions. Millions of women and young girls have been illegally transported from rural to urban areas and across national borders for the purpose of prostitution. This compelling video explores the social and economic forces that drive this lucrative underground trade, and the devastating impact it has on women's lives. A hopeful note is sounded by the actions of women's organizations working against sex trafficking in their native countries, including Nepal, Thailand, and the Philippines. National Educational Film Festival Award, American Psychological Association honoree, American Public Health Association honoree, Association for Asian Studies honoree.

* Thailand 1994 (20 min) Thailand, whose name means "land of the free," is the only country in Southeast Asia to have never been ruled by a Western power. Viewers will journey through the four major regions of Thailand - from the bustling international trade center of Bangkok to the Central Plains, which is regarded as one of the most fertile areas in the world. This program also explores the tremendous influence Buddhism has on all aspects of society. Viewers will also visit the historic Bridge over the River Kwai, and learn to the effects of Japanese occupation during World War II. A Southeast Asia Today series.

Thailand--An Exotic Paradise (Travel Video: 56 min) A travel video through Thailand, including Bangkok's floating market, an orchid farm in Chiang Mai, village life, and Buddhist monasteries, temples and statues. The inclusion of activities such as making a thatched roof, riding an elephant and learning traditional Thai dancing make this video accessible to many age groups. Produced by Video International.

* Thailand Before Buddha 1994 (44 min) One archaeological theory holds that, 12,000 years ago, large parts of what is Thailand today was submerged by massive floods. This program traces old legends of seafaring Thai nomads in the south and visits the 9000-year-old funeral site known as the Caves of the Spirits, as well as the Spirits of the Yellow Leaves, a people who live as nomads in the jungle and are considered the ancestors of the Thai people.

* Threads of Life 1993 (28 min) A vivid portrayal of Hmong gender roles in a mountainous Thai village illustrated by the production and use of hemp strings and cloth throughout life cycle events. This film addresses gender and kinship issues, social change and traditional crafts. In Hmong with English subtitles. Directed by Susan Morgan.

Today's Tomorrow 1992 (29 min) This documentary on children of Thailand focuses on the hardships of girls who have become prostitutes, and on homeless boys. The film explores some of the reasons why these children are not living in homes with their parents and discusses the emotional, physical and economic conditions of the children. Individuals working to help the children discuss their projects

Tongpan: Son of Isan 1975 (Feature Film: 65 min) 16mm. The real Tongpan disappeared from the small Mekong River town of Chiang Khan in June 1975. He was a peasant from the province of Kalasin who had lost his land because of a small hydroelectric dam that held water back during the dry season and released it during the wet. Isan is "the Northeast" of Thailand, and dam building is seen as the panacea to Isan's problems. This Thai feature film was directed by Surachay Chantimathorn who also wrote the music for the soundtrack and acts in the film. English subtitles.

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VIETNAM

* Anatomy of A Springroll 1993 (56 min) This extraordinary film distills the immigrant experience of adapting to one's new country while longing for the sounds, tastes and smells of the home left behind. "Food is everyone's first language," says Paul Kwan, the Vietnamese-born immigrant who made this film, drawing from the rich sensory memories of his childhood. He tells his story of finding a new life in America while maintaining his cultural connection through cooking, eating and sharing the rich and varied food of his native land. Nostalgia for the home of his childhood pervades the images of Paul and his mother cooking in his San Francisco kitchen, of street vendors simmering their soups, and of bustling markets piled with peppers, cilantro, and chilies. It is not until the death of his father that Paul visits Saigon and at that point finds that memory and reality finally are reconciled, and that he is ready to return to his adoptive country.

* Ao Dai 1991 (13 min) This film considers the visibility of ao dai, the traditional Vietnamese tunic dress, as a gauge of Vietnam's prosperity. During the war years, short dresses were not only more functional; they were made necessary because of cloth rationing. With increasing prosperity since the war, Vietnam has begun experiencing a cultural rebirth including the reemergence of traditional dress. The film's focus is on a student at a large Ho Chi Minh City high school named Trinh whose mother feels that she must own four or five ao dai to dress properly for school.

* As Seen by Both Sides: American and Vietnamese Artists Look at the War 1995 (58 min) Three years in the making, this one-hour film examines the history and tour of the remarkable exhibit for which it is named. Filmed in the United States and Vietnam, this documentary features the exhibition's paintings, rare Vietnamese and American archival footage, and interviews with artists, writers, scholars, veterans, and students. "As Seen by Both Sides" is both an unprecedented international conversation about the nature of art, and a unique public examination of the role that the arts play in chronicling and shaping popular and historical interpretations of the war. Directed by Mark Biggs. Produced by Larry Rottman. A SEAOP-Picante-Kenworth Bros Production.

* Asia: Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam 1996 (28 min) Progress versus culture, preserving archaeological sites, and rebuilding war-torn nations are featured in this program. A Frenchman and a Laotian are working together to improve the lives of local farmers in Laos by incorporating the farmers' opinions and cultural concerns. In Cambodia, efforts by the UN to preserve Angkor Wat, the famous archeological site and temple in Angkor, are detailed. In Vietnam, 62-year-old American Bob Sidell is helping the people of Dai Loc to rebuild infrastructures and generally improve their lives. A series of Our Developing World: Regional, Political, Geography

* Bui Doi: Life Like Dust 1994 (28 min) Black & White Life for most young Vietnamese gang members in the US is Bui Doi, "a life like dust." This film brings us inside the mind of Ricky Pham, currently serving an 11-year sentence for armed robbery in a California State prison. Through the integration of memories and recent experience, we are forced to ask ourselves which is more violent: fleeing from a war-ravaged country or trying to survive in an alien western culture? A study guide is included. Produced by Ahrin Mishan & Nick Rothenberg.

* Ho Chi Minh: The Man Behind the Myth (52 min) In Vietnam, one of the last communist nations, Ho Chi Minh remains the father figure for the nation. For many in the West there remains a fascination with Uncle Ho, the frail, idealistic leader who against seemingly insurmountable odds humiliated two of the world's strongest armies, the American and the French. This film, based on newsreel footage and interviews with contemporaries, traces the story of Ho Chi Minh's life.

How to Behave 1987 (Drama: 43 min) Originally banned in Vietnam, this is the first "glasnost" documentary to come out of Vietnam. A dying cameraman asked his friends to make a film on the subjects of human relations, kindness, and fraternity. Consequently, they begin to explore the reality behind political slogans and humans laboring as beasts. In Vietnamese with English subtitles, produced by Tran Van Thuy.

*Kontum Diary (56min) Kontum Diary is a moving story of discovery and reconciliation among former enemies, with broad applications for a wide range of audiences. Following a vicious battle during the Vietnam War, Paul Reed, a 19 year-old American soldier, found the diary of a North Vietnamese soldier he presumed was killed in the fight. Years later, after drifting through jobs and relationships, Reed discovered the diary and had it translated. The highly personal poetry of his former enemy had an unexpectedly powerful impact on him. When Reed learned that the Vietnamese soldier was still alive, he returned to Vietnam to meet him and return the diary. Kontum Diary documents the emotional meeting of these two former enemies, who revisit their field of battle to reflect on the war and its impact on their lives. Through their mutual journey, they make their own peace, overcoming past hatreds and stereotypes to create a lasting friendship based on their shared humanity.

Mai's America by Marlo Poras (2002). A spunky Vietnamese teenager named Mai gets the chance of a lifetime — to study in the United States. Expecting Hollywood, she instead lands in rural Mississippi, a crazy quilt of self-proclaimed rednecks, cliquish teenagers, South Vietnamese exiles and transvestite soulmates. From cosmopolitan Hanoi to the heart of the Deep South, Mai's unforgettable journey offers an outsider's glimpse inside America. (Winner of the SF Int'l Film Festival "Golden Gate" award and the Audience Award for Best Documentary at the South by Southwest Film Festival)

* The Story of Vinh 1990 (60 min) The son of a US serviceman and a Vietnamese mother arrives at JFK Airport dazed and confused, speaking no English. Vinh Dinh's difficult life in the US explodes the concept of the American Dream. Through his eyes, we are compelled to examine the complex legacy of abandoned children during wartime. Documentary.

* Teaching the Vietnam War: Classroom Strategies (72 min) REVIEW A must for anyone planning to teach the Vietnam War, this video features experienced teachers discussing and demonstrating how they handle the most sensitive aspects of the war.

* Thanh's War 1991 (58 min) Pham Thanh is a remarkable Vietnamese-American whose family was killed when he was twelve by a US grenade that also blew his throat apart. Ironically, Thanh was rescued and taken to America, where he built a new life in the land he had considered his enemy. He lives today in California, but he travels as often as he can to his ancestral village in Vietnam, and his traditional marriage there is captured in the film. This extraordinary documentary tells Thanh's courageous and poignant story as he grapples with the emotional legacy of the war and tries to make his way in two vastly different cultures. Produced by Elizabeth Farnsworth for KQED San Francisco.

Thuong Nho Dong Que -"Remembrance of the Countryside" 1984 (116 min) A dramatic and moving feature film by Vietnam's most famous filmmaker, Dang Nhat Minh. In Vietnamese with English subtitles.

* Vietnam: A Television History 1983 (7 volumes, total running time is 13 hours) Originally aired on PBS and produced by WGBH Boston, this acclaimed series provides a thorough record of the Vietnam conflict. The seven-video series examines the historical roots of the war and American involvement as well as impacts after 1975. With the exception of video 7, each video contains two episodes.
Volume 1: Roots of a War/ The First Vietnam War (1945-1954)
Volume 2: America's Mandarin (1954-1963)/ LBJ Goes to War (1964-1965)
Volume 3: America Takes Charge (1965-1967)/America's Enemy (1954-1967)
Volume 4: Tet (1968)/ Vietnamizing the War (1968-1973)
Volume 5: Cambodia and Laos/ Peace is At Hand (1968-1973)
Volume 6: Homefront USA/ The End of the Tunnel (1973-1975)
Volume 7: Legacies

* Vietnam: Land of the Ascending Dragon (54 min) This video takes viewers on a visual journey through Vietnam from the Red River Delta, and the boulevards of Hanoi, to Ho Chi Minh City, and the Mekong Delta. Highlights include the Hung King Festival which marks the founding of Vietnam, and a performance of water puppets with a cast frog catchers, fairies, and mythical monsters. Other stops along the way include Confucian and Buddhist shrines, the caves of Da Nang's Marble Mountain, and the Huyen Khong Cave which was a field hospital during the "American War."

* Vietnam Mission: Fifty Years Among the Montagnards 1993 (56 min) This is the story of a remarkable Canadian-American missionary couple who settled in 1929 among the Montagnard tribes of Vietnam's central highlands. For 50 years, Gordon and Laura Smith lived there, preaching, working to open leprosariums and orphanages, compiling a unique archive of diaries, books, photographs, and 16 mm films that record a fascinating way of life that has now vanished. The full sweep of 20th century Vietnamese history is conveyed in these images of French colonialism, Japanese invasion, and American intervention. Interwoven with archival footage and traditional music are interviews with surviving Montagnards and Dr. Gerald Hickey, an American anthropologist specializing in Montagnard cultures. Produced and directed by Douglas W. Smith. Narrated by Charles Kuralt.

* Vietnamese Bike Dreams (24 min) In Ho Chi Minh City, the motorbike reigns supreme. With limited public transportation and not enough affluence to afford automobiles, people long for motorbikes to take them to work and cruise about on weekends. With a population around 4 million, there are reported to be some eight hundred thousand motorbikes, causing massive traffic jams in the morning. There is one particular bike, called The Dram that is currently the most coveted by the young Vietnamese. They save, scrimp and borrow to be able to buy one. Minh, aged 32, lives with his wife and child in a tiny 12-foot square room built in a gap between two buildings. He finds it difficult to decide between moving into roomier quarters or buying a Dream. Through this report on the motorbike craze, we are afforded a rare look at the Vietnamese people in a rapidly changing time.

* A World Beneath the War: The Secret Tunnels of Vietnam (53 min) In 1965, the villagers of a North Vietnamese district found themselves on the frontlines of an increasingly brutal war. They began to build an underground complex of tunnels, and proceeded to move their communities underground. Through the firsthand accounts of these villagers, as well as an American former P.O.W. held in the tunnels, this video illustrates this subterranean world. Rare archival footage reveals miles of catacombs where as many as 2,000 people took shelter.

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ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF VIDEOS

A - C:

Adventures of Wayan and the Three R's (Indonesia)

Anatomy of a Springroll (Vietnam) Ao Dai (Vietnam)

As Seen By Both Sides: American and Vietnamese Artists Look At the War (Vietnam)

Asia: Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam

Asia Close Up: Japan/Cambodia

Asian Insight Series: Program Two: Hong Kong/Singapore

Asian Insight Series: Program Three: Indonesia

Asian Insight Series: Program Four: The Philippines

Asian Insight Series: Program Five: Malaysia

Asian Insight Series: Program Six: Thailand

BBC Television Clips on Thailand's "Bloody May" (Thailand)

Beyond Rangoon (Burma)

Bui Doi: Life Like Dust (Vietnam)

Cambodia: Year Ten Cambodian Court and Folk Dances (Cambodia)

Candles For New Years (Thailand)

Clara, or the Woman Who Was Raped (Indonesia)

Cross and Kalashnikov: The Unknown War in Burma (Burma)

Cry of the Forgotten Land (Indonesia)

Dancing Through Death: The Monkey, Magic and Madness of Cambodia (Cambodia)

D - G:

The Delicate Balance (Malaysia)

From Angkor to America: The Cambodian Dance and Music Project (Cambodia)

From Mulberry Leaves to Silk Textiles (Laos)

The Goddess and the Computer (Indonesia)

The Golf War (Philippines)

H - K:

Hello From Around the World: BALI (Indonesia)

Ho Chi Minh: The Man Behind the Myth (Vietnam)

The Horses of Life and Death (Indonesia)

How to Behave (Vietnam)

The Human Face of Indonesia Series: But I'll Always Continue to Write

The Human Face of Indonesia Series: Journey to a New Life

The Human Face of Indonesia Series: Helping the People to Help Themselves

The Human Face of Indonesia Series: We Are Nothing Without the People

The Human Face of Indonesia Series: Master of the Shadows

Indonesia: Islands on Fire

Indonesia: Riding the Tiger, Part One: Kings and Coolies

Indonesia: Riding the Tiger, Part Two: Freedom or Death

Indonesia: Riding the Tiger, Part Three: The New Order

Inside Burma: Land of Fear Khmer Court Dance (Cambodia)

Kmhmu Folklife in America (Laos)

Kontum Diary (Vietnam)

L - O:

The Lao Natasin Music and Dance Troupe (Laos)

The Last God King: The Life and Times of Cambodia's Sihanouk (Cambodia)

The Lost Tribe (The Philippines)

Mai's America (Vietnam)

Max Havelaar (Indonesia)

Minangkabau Houses and Toraja Architecture (Indonesia)

Moving Mountains: The Story of the Yiu Mien (Laos)

The Other Thailand One Way Ticket to Hualampong (Thailand)

One World: The Kingdom of Thailand (Thailand)

P - S:

Paj Ntaub: Textile Techniques of the Hmong (Hmong-Laos)

Peacemaking: The Power of Non-Violence and East Timor (Indonesia-East Timor)

The Philippines: The Price of Power (The Philippines)

Prostitute: A Factor to Nicdom (Thailand)

Roundtable on Indonesia (Indonesia)

Silent Danger (Thailand)

Singapore Sisters and Daughters Betrayed (Thailand and The Philippines)

The Story of Vinh (Vietnam)

T - U:

Teaching the Vietnam War: Classroom Strategies (Vietnam)

The Tenth Anniversary Celebration in PRK (Cambodia)

Thailand (Thailand)

Thailand: An Exotic Paradise Thailand Before Buddha (Thailand)

Thanh's War (Vietnam)

Thinking About Change in Indonesia: A Conversation With G. Mohamed (Indonesia)

Threads Of Life (Hmong, Thailand)

The Three Worlds of Bali (Indonesia)

Thuong Nho Dong Que (Vietnam)

Tobelo Marriage (Indonesia)

Today's Tomorrow (Thailand)

Tongpan: Son of Isan (Thailand)

Too Much Air To Breathe: A Lao Monk-Healer and his Community (Laos)

V - Z:

Vietnam: A Television History (7 Volumes) (Vietnam)

Vietnam: Land of the Ascending Dragon (Vietnam)

Vietnam Mission: Fifty Years Among the Montagnards (Vietnam)

Vietnamese Bike Dreams (Vietnam)

White Christmas (the Philippines)

A World Beneath The War (Vietnam)


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Southeast Asia Center
University of Washington
303 Thomson Hall
Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-9606 tel
(206) 685-0668 fax
seac@u.washington.edu

Laurie Sears, Director

Rick Bonus, Director of Graduate Studies

Sara Van Fleet, Associate Director

Tikka Sears, Outreach Coordinator

Molly Wilskie-Kala, Program Coordinator

Mary Barnes, Program Assistant

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