Liquid Planet: Exploring Global Water Issues

2009 Summer Seminar 
 

Photos from the 2009 Summer Seminar

View the album online
 
Wednesday June 24, 2009 to Thursday June 25, 2009
8:30AM-4:00PM

The Outreach Centers at The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies invite you to attend the annual Summer Seminar for Educators, June 24-25, 2009. This year’s seminar, "Liquid Planet: Exploring Global Water Issues" will focus on the major water-related issues affecting communities around the world. With presentations on water and power in the Middle East, water management in India and Central Asia, Canadian-US trans-border water issues, the waterways of the Salween, Mekong and Yangtze and more, this seminar will give teacher-participants the confidence, knowledge and strategies to implement water-related curriculum in the classroom and to use water issues to increase interest in global studies. This two-day seminar is designed for middle school, high school, and community college educators.

Registration Fee: $95* (non-refundable) includes parking/bus passes, coffee/tea, morning pastries, lunch, and 16 WA state clock hours (you must attend the entire seminar to receive clock hours). Limited travel stipends are available (but not guaranteed) for teachers traveling more than 75 miles. In order to receive clock hours, you must register by June 17, 2009. Sponsored by the Outreach Centers at the Jackson School of International Studies. For more information, contact the Ellison Center at 206-543-4852 or by email: reecas@u.washington.edu

Objective: This seminar will give teacher-participants the confidence, knowledge and strategies to implement water-related curriculum in the classroom and to use water issues to increase interest in global studies.

Useful links for the classroom

Keynote

 

Water Matters:

Global Perspectives on Quantity, Quantity, Availability, and Equity

 

DARRIN MAGEE

Darrin Magee is Assistant Professor of Asian Environmental Studies at Hobart & William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY, and a research affiliate of the Asian International Rivers Center (Kunming, China) and Rocky Mountain Institute (Snowmass, Colorado). He teaches courses on water, environment and development in East Asia, garbage, and human geography. His research concentrates on water and energy in China, with a particular focus on hydropower and water transfer projects. He has also led several professional development programs for educators to China through the Jackson School’s East Asia Resource Center and the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia; and he has taught high school in Colorado (2006-7) and Louisiana (1998-99). Darrin received his Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Washington.

Facilitator

 

DAN MIRSKY

Dan Mirsky has been a Social Studies teacher for ten years and has just completed his master’s degree in the Instructional Leadership program at the UW’s College of Education. His graduate work focused on curriculum writing and professional development, and his particular area of interest is transformational leadership practices. In the fall he will take up a new position as a 6th-grade teacher at Match Public Charter School, Boston.

Speakers

 
ELLIS GOLDBERG
Water and Power in the Contemporary Middle East

Ellis Goldberg is a Carnegie Scholar, Professor of Political Science, and a Middle East specialist. His research interests are very wide ranging and include such subjects as child labor in 20th century Egypt, freedom of express in the Arab world, oil futures markets in Egypt, and civil society in medieval Arab theory and practice. He has published thought-provoking articles and presentation on topics such as democracy in the Middle East, the decline of English socialism, and revisions of the crusades. One of his recent articles on “Democracy, Development and the Resource Curse” has won recognition by the American Association of Political Scientists this year. Over the years, he has taught courses on both water and oil in the Middle East at the UW.

KEITH GOYDON
Innovations and Challenges in Water Management in India

Keith Goyden is the Program Coordinator for the University of Washington South Asia Center’s Environment and Development in India Study Abroad Program. He also works on education and water resource management with the Central Himalayan Rural Action Group (CHIRAG), Village Simayal, Nainital District, Uttarakhand, India, and is a research associate with the Centre for Ecology, Development and Research (CEDAR) in New Delhi, India.

JACQUELINE MEIJER-IRONS
From Fighting Back to Making Friends: The Evolution of Dutch Water Policy in the Age of Climate Change

Jacqueline Meijer-Irons is a third year Ph.D. student in Public Policy and Management at the Evans School of Public Affairs, UW. Her research focuses on human adaptations to climate change and migration, with a focus on coastal food commodities. She spent the summer of 2003 at the University of Twente in Enschede, The Netherlands, conducting comparative policy research on Spanish and Dutch water policy. She holds an A.B in Integrative Biology from UC Berkeley and an MPA from the Evans School of Public Affairs.

DARRIN MAGEE
Monsoons, Megawatts, and Monster Catfish: Conflict and Cooperation over Mainland Southeast Asia’s Transboundary Rivers

Darrin Magee is Assistant Professor of Asian Environmental Studies at Hobart & William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY, and a research affiliate of the Asian International Rivers Center (Kunming, China) and Rocky Mountain Institute (Snowmass, Colorado). He teaches courses on water, environment and development in East Asia, garbage, and human geography. His research concentrates on water and energy in China, with a particular focus on hydropower and water transfer projects. He has also led several professional development programs for educators to China through the Jackson School’s East Asia Resource Center and the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia; and he has taught high school in Colorado (2006-7) and Louisiana (1998-99). Darrin received his Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Washington.

BRETT WALTON
Politics and Environmental Management in the Aral Sea Basin

Brett Walton is a 2009 graduate of the Jackson School's M.A. program in Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies. His thesis focused on political obstacles to cooperation over water resources in the Aral Sea basin. He is also involved with a U.S. State Department project on climate change and water management in Central Asia.

EMMA S. NORMAN
Cooperating with Neighbors: Managing Water across the Canada-US Border

Emma S. Norman is a post-doctorate fellow with the Program on Water Governance (UBC) working with water security issues and has been on the faculty at Northwest Indian College (Lummi Nation) since 2002, where she teaches environmental studies and political science courses. She has extensive experience working on international resource issues, including projects assessing the community health impacts of the flower industry in rural Ecuador; studying population growth and deforestation in rural Nepal; working in Malawi as an environmental educator and women and development facilitator; and working with tribal governments on natural resource management issues. Norman holds a Ph.D. in geography from the University of British Columbia, where she studied trans-boundary governance of water

Sponsored by the Outreach Centers at the Jackson School of International Studies