MIDDLE EAST STUDIES PROGRAM

WINTER COURSE OFFERINGS
2001

MIDDLE EAST STUDIES

SLN: 7092
SISME 213 A Introduction to Modern Middle East (5 Cr) WOODS, P
w/NEAR E 213 A (SLN: 5627)
TTh 1:30-3:20 CMU 120
The course will focus on a few key movements and institutions through which people and politics intersect in the 20th century Middle East, including nationalism, Pan-Arabism, Pan-Islam, feminism, religion and law. The course will begin with a brief introduction to basic principles, change and diversity in Islam so that students may place in context the topics raised in the remainder of the course. A question underlying the course will be the extent to which Western Europe and the United States have been influential in social and political changes in the Middle East, and the extent to which these trends emerged as responses to internal debates within the region. The emphasis throughout the course will be on developing analytical reading and speaking skills, through group work inside and outside of class, group presentations, and active class discussion. Those analytical skills will also be applied to other media, including selected films.

SLN: 7093
SISME 499 A Undergrad Research (Var Cr, 1-5) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

SLN: 7094
SISME 499 B Undergrad Research (Var Cr, 1-5) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

SLN: 7095
SISME 600 INDEPENDENT STUDY/Research (Var Cr, 1-10) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

SLN: 7096
SISME 700 MASTERS THESIS (Var Cr, 1-10) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111 

ANTHROPOLOGY

SLN: 1205 AA
ANTH 100 Introduction to Anthropology (5 Cr) GREEN
Other sessions available
MWThF 10:30-11:20 GUG 224
T 9:30-10:20 DEN 304
Introduction to the subfields of archaeology, biocultural anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology through the examination of selected problems in human physical, cultural, and social evolution. Everything you ever wanted to know about people: what we came from (not monkeys!); why we are shaped like we are; why gender and "racial" variations exist; why we live together in families; why there is nothing "natural" at all about love; and why we believe some of the things we do about this life and life (so most everyone hopes) after our earthly demise. Anthropology looks at things in the long-term (4 million years or so) and cross-culturally (other cultures with their own, distinctive ways of doing things).

ARCHEOLOGY

SLN: 1305
ARCHY 105 AA WORLD PREHISTORY (5 Cr) CLOSE
Other Sections available
MWThF 10:30-11:20 GWN 301
T 8:30-9:20 DEN 212
Prehistoric human ancestors from three million years ago: their spread from Africa and Asia into the Americas, survival during ice ages, development of civilizations. Well-known archaeological finds, e.g., Olduvai Gorge; Neanderthals; Jericho; Egyptian pyramids; Mexican temples; Mesa Verde; Ozette, Washington.

ART HISTORY

SLN: 1428
ART H 202 AA WEST ART MED & REN (5 Credits) SNOW-SMITH
Other Sections available
MWF 1:30-2:20 KNE 120
TTh 10:30-11:20 ART 206
ART H 202 Survey of Western Art-Medieval and Renaissance. The arts of the Byzantine Empire, Islam, and Western Christendom through 1520 AD

COMPARATIVE RELIGION

SLN: 6940
RELIG 212 A INTRO TO THE QUR’AN (5 Credits) B. WHEELER
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH NEAR E 212 A
MWF 1:30-2:50 PAR 108 (SEE NEAR E 211 AA for Course Description)
W 3:30-4:20 PAR 106

ENGLISH

SLN: 3347
ENGL 310 A BIBLE AS LITERATURE (5 Credits) gRIFFITH
Add Code required: Instructor (PD. 3)
MTWThF 10:30-11:20 CHL 015
Introduction to the development of the religious ideas and institutions of ancient Israel, with selected readings from the Old Testament and New Testament. Emphasis on reading The Bible with literary and historical understanding.

SLN: 3348
ENGL 311 A MOD JEWISH LIT TRANS (5 Credits) ALEXANDER
Add Code required: Instructor (PD. 3)
MTWThF 10:30-11:20 MOR 221
Survey of Jewish experience and its literary expression since 1880. Includes such Yiddish writers as Sholom Aleichem, Peretz, and I. B. Singer; such Israeli writers as Agnon, Hazaz, and Appelfeld; and such writers in non-Jewish languages as Primo Levi and Kafka. 

GEOGRAPHY

SLN: 3920
GEOG 471 A METH RESOURCE ANALYSIS (5 Cr) ZUMBRUNNEN
TTh 10:30-12:20 SMI 113
Economic and noneconomic criteria for resource analysis. Theory and methods of linear models of natural resource analysis. Includes materials-balance modeling, residuals management, constrained system optimization approaches to water quality analysis, land-use patterns and interregional energy use, and multiple objective planning techniques applied to natural resource problems. Recommended: GEOG 370. Also some mixed-attribute, multiple attribute, multiple-objective and dynamic simulation techniques (using Stella Trade Mark or iTHINK Trade Mark software on Macintosh) will be explored. The course will be taught assuming the student has studied neither the calculus nor matrix algebra. Rather than presenting purely a "cook book" or "canned" approach; however, students will be exposed to both the theory and mathematics behind the methods prior to using the various computer programs available on both mainframes and micros. The goal of the course is to impart a good operational knowledge of various analytical tools which can be applied to resource management as well as other social, economic and transportation geography problems. In addition to geographic research in general, this class should prove valuable to the individual interested in the professional world with a public or private employer dealing with resource managment/development issues. As much theory as possible will precede method so that the student gains an appreciation of the appropriate context in which to apply a given technique.

HUMANITIES

SLN: 4296
HUM 596C SPEC STUDIES: COMPAR ISLAMIC STUDIES (3 Credits) KASABA
w/SIS 590 A (SLN: 7053)
W 1:30-3:20 CMU 202 (see sis 590A for course description)

HISTORY

SLN: 4103
HIST 225 A SILK ROAD (5 Credits) WAUGH
w/SISRE 225 A (SLN: 7097)
MWF 1:30-2:50 SAV 249
History of cultural and economic exchange across Eurasia from the early Common Era to modern times. Topics include spread of religions such as Islam and Buddhism, overland trade in rare commodities, interaction between nomadic and sedentary cultures, the role of empires, the culture of daily life, and the arts.

SLN: 4264
HSTEU 466 A SEPHARDIC DIASPORA (5 Credits) STEIN
w/SISJE 466 A
MWTh 10:30-11:50 THO 134
Examines the history and culture of Sephardic Jewry from the expulsion from the Iberian Peninsula in 1492 to the present. Explores the creation of Sephardic communities in the Dutch and Ottoman Empires, Western Europe, the Americas, and Africa, and the history of the conversos and "hidden Jews." 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

SLN: 7036
SIS 490 D SPEC STUDIES (5 Credits) WHEELER, D
INTERNET POLITICAL ECONOMY
TTh 1:30-3:20 MEB 249
The rapid spread of the Internet has created a revolution affecting all aspects of the global political-economy: cultural identity; interactions between states and markets; sovereignty and civil society. This course is an attempt to introduce students to how Internet driven forces (bandwidth, innovation, web) are affecting the orthodox mores and rules of the contemporary world system. After introducing the basic features of the Internet revolution, the course will study how technology is changing the nature of trade, international relations, and institutional reform. Topics such as the Internet’s role in shaping a new economy based on the exchange of knowledge will be examined through academic, business, and government perspectives. This introductory interdisciplinary course offers a broad survey of a complex topic in ways that are accessible to advanced undergraduates and graduate students with social science or technical backgrounds. It is the first course in a curriculum being organized by the Center for Internet Studies of the Institute for International Policy. The course is built around required weekly readings on which the lecture/discussion sessions will be based. Undergraduates will take a mid-term or write a short paper, and complete a final examination. Graduate students will write a paper on a topic to be discussed with the instructor.

SLN: 7053
SIS 590 A SPEC TOPICS (3 Credits) KASABA
w/HUM 596 C STATE & SOCIETY IN OTTOMAN EMPIRE
W 1:30-3:20 MEB 249
Recent scholarship has effectively questioned the classical periodization of Ottoman history as a tribal entity succeeded by a centralized empire followed by a de-centralizing, declining, and yet reforming state. We are developing a more nuanced understanding of the periods and dynamics of this history now. In particular, we have learned to pay special attention to the patterns of interaction between the Ottoman state and groups within the Ottoman society and to how the boundaries between these two spheres were drawn and negotiated on various levels over the empire’s long existence. This course will focus on how the nature of these interactions changed over the course of the empire and how they played a key role in shaping the distinct phases of this history. The course will also include discussion of the different ways in which Ottoman historiography has dealt with these relations.

JEWISH STUDIES

SLN: 8082
SISJE 466 A SEPHARDIC DIASPORA (5 Credits) STEIN
w/HSTEU 466 A)
MWTh 10:30-11:50 THO 134
SEE HSTEU 466A FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION

COMPARATIVE RELIGION

SLN: 6940
RELIG 212 A INTRO TO THE QUR’AN (5 Credits) WHEELER, D.
w/NEAR E 212 A
MWF 1:30-4:20 PAR 108
W 3:30-4:20 PAR 106

SLN: 6941
RELIG 212 B WHEELER, D. w/NEAR E 212 A
ADD CODE: HONORS PROGRAM
W 3:30-4:20 PAR 106
Emphasis on the historical context of the Quran, the history of the text, its collection, organization, and interpretation. In English.

Near Eastern Courses in English
(for Information Call Near East Dept. - 543-6033)

NEAR E 212 A w/RELIG 212 A SLN: 5625 INTRO TO THE QUR'AN WHEELER,B 5 MWF 1:30-2:50 PAR 108
NEAR E 212 B w/RELIG 212 B SLN: 5626 INTRO TO THE QUR'AN ADD CODE: HONORS PROGRAM WHEELER,B 5 MWF 1:30-2:50 PAR 108 W 3:30-420 PAR 106

Emphasis on the historical context of the Quran, the history of the text, its collection, organization, and interpretation. In English. Offered: jointly with NEAR E 212.

NEAR E 213 A w/SISME 213 A SLN: 5627 INTRO MOD MID EAST WOODS, P 5 TTh 1:30-3:20 CMU 120

SEE SISME 213 FOR COURSE DESCRIPTION

NEAR E 496 A SLN: 5629 w/NEAR E 596 A SPEC STUDIES “KAZAKH-KIRGHIZ STUDIES” CIRTAUTAS 3 TTh 1:30-3:20 CMU 120
NEAR E 596 A SLN: 5632(Grads only) w/NEAR E 496 A SPEC STUDIES "KAZAKH-KIRGHIZ STUDIES" CIRTAUTAS 3 TO BE ARRANGED

“KAZAKH-KIRGHIZ STUDIES" Reading of selected texts in modern literary Kazakh, with continuing emphasis on grammar, syntax and oral practice. Prerequisite: 317 or equivalent

NEAR E 496 B w/NEAR E 596 B SLN: 5630 SPEC STUDIES HISPANO-ARABIC POETRY DEYOUNG 3 TTh 1:30-3:20 PAR 213
NEAR E 596 B w/NEAR E 496 B SLN: 5633(Grads only) SPEC STUDIES HISPANO-ARABIC POETRY DEYOUNG 3 TTh 1:30-3:20 PAR 213
NEAR E 490 A SLN: 5628 SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
NEAR E 499 A SLN: 5631 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
NEAR E 600 A SLN: 7682 INDEPNDNT STDY/RESEARCH (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

NEAR EASTERN LANGUAGE COURSES
(for Information Call Near East Dept. - 543-6033)

ARABIC
Course Number SLN Number Description Instructor Credits Days/Times Room
ARAB 412 AA SLN: 1253 ELEMENTARY ARABIC SOUAIAIA 5 MWF 1230-120 DEN 213 TTh 1230-120 DEN 211
ARAB 412 AB SLN: 1254 ELEMENTARY ARABIC SOUAIAIA 5 TTh 1230-120 DEN 211 MWF 9:30-10:20 ART 004
ARAB 422 A SLN: 1255 INTERMED ARABIC SOUAIAIA 5 MTWThF 11:30-12:20 PAR 306
ARAB 432 A SLN: 1256 ADVANCED ARABIC DEYOUNG 3 TTh 10:30-12:20 DEN 212
ARAB 454 A SLN: 1257 QURAN INTERPRTATION WHEELER, B 3 MW 10:00-12:20 DEN 215
ARAB 490 A SLN: 1258 SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
ARAB 499 A SLN: 1259 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
ARAB 600 A SLN: 1260 INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

EGYPT

Course Number SLN Number Description Instructor Credits Days/Times Room
EGYPT 422 A SLN: 3107 READINGS IN COPTIC WILLIAMS 3 TTh 8:00-9:20 PAR 120

HEBREW

Course Number SLN Number Description Instructor Credits Days/Times Room
HEBR 412 A SLN: 8195 ELEM MODERN HEBREW   5 MTWThF 9:30-10:20 MGH 288
HEBR 415 A SLN: 4073 ELEM BIBLICAL HEBREW NOEGEL 5 TTh 10:30-12:20 LOW 116
HEBR 422 A SLN: 4074 INTERMED MOD HEBREW   5 MTWThF 10:30-11:20 DEN 213
HEBR 451 A SLN: 4075 INTRO TO HEBREW LIT SOKOLOFF 3 MWF 11:30-12:20 DEN 213
HEBR 490 A SLN: 4076 SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
HEBR 499 A SLN: 4077 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
HEBR 600 A SLN: 4078 INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

PERSIAN

Course Number SLN Number Description Instructor Credits Days/Times Room
PRSAN 412 A SLN: 6634 ELEMENTARY PERSIAN BARLAS 5 MTWThF 9:30-10:20 WBD

Conversation, pronunciation, and graded reading. Persian alphabet and basic sentence constructions. Offers rudimentary conversational and reading ability with a vocabulary of about two thousand words. Prerequisite: PRSAN 412 or equivalent.

PRSAN 422 A SLN: 6635 INTERMED PERSIAN BARLAS 5 MTWThF 10:30-11:20 PAR 313
PRSAN 455 A SLN: 6636 THE PERSIAN GHAZAL (PREREQ: PRSAN 433 OR EQUIV.) KARIMI-HAKKA 5 MF 1:30-2:50 PAR 305
PRSAN 490 A SLN: 6637 SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
PRSAN 499 A SLN: 6638 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
PRSAN 600 A SLN: 6639 INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

TURKIC

Course Number SLN Number Description Instructor Credits Days/Times Room
TKIC 412 A SLN: 7672 ELEMENTARY UZBEK CIRTAUTAS 5 TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 422 A SLN: 7673 INTERMEDIATE UZBEK CIRTAUTAS 3 TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 455 A SLN: 8196 INTRO UZBEK LIT   3 TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 546 SLN: 8403 A OLD TURKIC Orkhon Turkic CIRTAUTAS 3 F 130-250 DEN 215

This course will discuss the language and the historical and literary significance of the oldest Turkic documents, inscribed on funeral steles in a script resembling the Runic alphabet of the Germanic tribes. The steles were erected in the vicinity of the river Orkhon, in northwestern Mongolia, hence the designation: Orkhon Turkic. Discovered between 1893 and 1897, the inscriptions immortalize leaders of the II. Turk Empire (680-745 a.d.) The language preserved on these stone monuments is the ancestral language of all Turkic languages spoken today. Although centuries apart, Orkhon Turkic is surprisingly close to its modern variants.

TKIC 490 A SLN: 7674 SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 499 A SLN: 7675 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 600 A SLN: 7676 INDEPNDNT STDY/RESEACH (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

TURKISH

Course Number SLN Number Description Instructor Credits Days/Times Room
TKISH 412 A SLN: 7677 ELEMENTARY TURKISH KURU 5 MTWThF 9:30-10:20 DEN 215
TKISH 422 A SLN: 7678 INTERMED TURKISH KURU 5 MTWThF 10:30-11:20 GLD 317
TKISH 452 A SLN: 7679 OTTOMAN EMP LIT HST KURU 3 MW 1:30-3:00 GLD 317
TKISH 490 A SLN: 7680 SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKISH 499 A SLN: 7681 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKISH 600 A SLN: 7682 INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

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The Middle East Center
University of Washington
225 Thomson Hall
Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-4227 phone
(206) 685-0668 fax
mecuw@u.washington.edu

Ellis Goldberg, Director
goldberg@uw.edu

Felicia Hecker, Associate Director
fhecker@uw.edu