October 2014 | Jackson School calendar | archive and advanced search

Latin American and Caribbean Studies


This Week

Click on the title for more details.

All Events

October 2014


The Good Life: Guatemalan Coffee, Cocaine, and Capabilities

Thursday October 2, 2014
4:30-6pm
Thomson Hall 101

Edward Fischer, Vanderbilt University

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Center for Global Studies, Latin and Caribbean Studies Department, and the Department of Anthropology

lasuw@u.washington.edu

Drawing from his new book, The Good Life, Vanderbilt anthropologist Edward Fischer, examines the culture, ethics, and economics of commodity chains. Fischer explores how peoples’ lives and aspirations for the good life get attached to things and global value chains. He also makes a case for what anthropology can contribute to public policy debates. Edward F. Fischer is Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt University. He is also the founder of Maní+, a program in Guatemala that develops and produces locally sourced complementary foods to fight malnutrition. He has written and edited several books, including Cultural Logics and Global Economies, Broccoli and Desire, and Cash on the Table. His new book, The Good Life: Aspiration, Dignity, and the Anthropology of Wellbeing is being published by Stanford University Press.
return to top


Rivers for Life: Cultural Resistance to the Xalalá Dam

Monday October 6, 2014
5:00-7pm
Allen Library, Allen Auditorium

Victor Caal Tuzy, NISGUA 2014 Fall Tour

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies Department and the American Indian Studies Department

lasuw@u.washington.edu

Join the Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala (NISGUA) and the Association of Communities for Development and the Defense of Land and Natural Resources (ACODET), sharing stories of community-based organizing and resistance to the Xalalá Hydroelectric Dam – a government imposed project that would, if constructed, irreparably damage the land, livelihoods and culture of nearly 100 Maya Q’eqchi’ indigenous communities in Guatemala. ACODET Coordinator Victor Caal Tzuy will speak about the role of Maya Q’eqchi’ culture in his community’s resistance to the Xalalá dam. Victor Caal Tuzy is an educator, a community organizer, a human rights defender, and a founding member of ACODET.
return to top


The Human Rights Crisis in Central America: Conversations and Music from Honduran Artist and Feminist Karla Lara

Wednesday October 22, 2014
5:00-6:30pm
Thomson 101

Karla Lara, Respect Dignity, and Resistance Tour 2014

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and Comparative History of Ideas

lasuw@u.washington.edu

Karla Lara is a member of the National Network of Women Human Rights Defenders in Honduras, which participates in the Meso-American Initiative of Women Human Rights Defenders. Karla is a feminist and a singer/artist and a member of Artistas en Resistencia. Her children are members of the Frente Revolucionario Artistico Contra Cultural.
return to top


Why are the Border Kids Fleeing? Human Rights and U.S. Policy in Honduras and Central America

Thursday October 23, 2014
7:00pm
Thomson 101

Dana Frank, University of California, Santa Cruz

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Center for Human Rights, Comparative History of Ideas, and the Department of History

lasuw@u.washington.edu

Media reports of unaccompanied, undocumented children arriving at the U.S. border from Central America have depicted their flight from gangs and violence. But silence largely reigns regarding the underlying economic and political roots of the crisis, in dangerous governments supported by the United States. This presentation looks at human rights and U.S. policy in post-coup Honduras, in particular, as well as dynamics within Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua. It will also discuss grassroots efforts across the U.S. and in Congress to affect U.S. policy in Central America.


return to top
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Box 353650, 419 Thomson Hall
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 616-0998
lasuw@u.washington.edu
Advising: (206) 543-6001

Dr. José Antonio Lucero
Director
jal26@u.washington.edu

Dr. Linda Iltis
Academic Advisor
(206) 543-6001
iltis@u.washington.edu

Joni Marts
Academic Advisor
(206) 543-6001
jmarts@u.washington.edu

Deb Raftus
LACS Librarian
draftus@u.washington.edu