José Antonio Lucero

 

Associate Professor, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Chair, Latin American and Caribbean Studies
University of Washington Seattle, Box 353650, WA 98195-3650
jal26@u.washington.edu; 206.616.1643 (voice); 206.685.0668 (fax)

Bio

José Antonio Lucero was born in El Paso, Texas, and raised on both sides of the Mexico-US border. His main research and teaching interests include Indigenous politics, social movements, Latin American politics, and borderlands. Using frameworks and methods from the fields of comparative political science and anthropology, Lucero is interested in the intersections of theories of politics and culture, and the methods of historical institutionalism, cultural studies, and ethnography. He has conducted field research in Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and Peru. In addition to numerous articles, Lucero is the author of Struggles of Voice: The Politics of Indigenous Representation in the Andes (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2008) and the co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Indigenous Peoples Politics (Oxford University Press, forthcoming). His currently working on two research project that examine the cultural politics of (1) conflicts between Indigenous peoples and the agents of extractive industry in Peru and (2) human rights activism, religion, and Indigenous politics on the Mexico-US border.

Education

2002 Ph.D. Department of Politics, Princeton University

1997 M.A., Department of Politics, Princeton University

1996 Certificate in Mexican Studies, El Colegio de México, Mexico City

1994 B.A. with Honors, Political Science, Stanford University


Academic Positions Held

2010- Associate Professor, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington

2008-10 Assistant Professor, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington

2002-2008 Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Temple University

 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Awards (Since 2006)

2011 Simpson Center for the Humanities (UW), Research Cluster Award, “Global Indigenous Politics”

2011 Mellon Foundation, Sawyer Seminar Grant, “(B)ordering Violence: Boundaries, Indigeneity, and Gender in the Americas”

2011 Social Science Research Council Faculty Field Award to Direct DPDF Field on “Global Indigenous Politics” (with Bret Gustafson)

2011 Finalist, Distinguished Teaching Award, University of Washington

2010 UW Royalty Research Fund Research Fellowship

2009 Simpson Center for the Humanities (UW), Research Cluster Award. “Dangerous Subjects: Danger and Subjectivity in the Americas”

2009 Jackson School Student Service Award

2007 Woodrow Wilson Center Junior Scholar Fellowship

2006 Ford Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellowship

2006 Temple University Study Leave


Selected Publications (Since 2006)

Book and Edited Volumes

Donna Lee Van Cott, José Antonio Lucero, and Dale Turner, editors. Oxford Handbook on Indigenous Politics. Volume in preparation, under contract with Oxford University Press.

José Antonio Lucero, Struggles of Voice: The Politics of Indigenous Representation in the Andes. University of Pittsburgh Press. 2008.

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles and Book Chapters

José Antonio Lucero, “Ambivalent Multiculturalisms: Perversity, Futility and Jeopardy in Latin America.” In Todd Eisenstadt, et al. eds. Paradigms and Paradoxes of Multiculturalism. Forthcoming, Oxford University Press.

José Antonio Lucero. “Encountering Indigeneity: Reflections on the International Funding of Indigeneity in Peru.” In Maximilian Forte, ed. Who Is An Indian? Race, Place, and the Politics of Indigeneity in the Americas. University of Toronto Press. Forthcoming.
José Antonio Lucero, “Paradoxes of Indigenous Politics, Americas Quarterly, Spring 2011,Volume 5 Issue 3.

Maria Elena García and José Antonio Lucero, “Authenticating Indians and Movements: Interrogating Indigenous Authenticity, Social Movements, and Fieldwork in Contemporary Peru,” in Laura Gotkowitz, ed. Histories of Race and Racism: The Andes and Mesoamerica from Colonial Times to the Present. Duke University Press. 2011.

José Antonio Lucero. “‘We are all presidents’: Evo Morales and the Challenges of an Indigenous-Popular Government in Bolivia.” In Documenting Latin America: Gender, Documenting Latin America Vol. 1 Race, and Nation, ed. Erin O’Connor and Leo Garofalo. New York: Pearson. 2010.


José Antonio Lucero. “Decades Lost and Won: The Articulations of Indigenous Movements and Multicultural Neoliberalism in the Andes,” In Phil Oxhorn, Kenneth Roberts, and John Burdick, eds. Beyond Neoliberalism. Palgrave. 2009.


José Antonio Lucero. “Fanon in the Andes: Fausto Reinaga, Indianismo, and the Black Atlantic.” International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2008, pp. 12-21.
Maria Elena García and José Antonio Lucero. “Exceptional Others: Politicians, Rottweilers, and Alterity in the 2006 Peruvian Elections.” Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies. Vol. 3, Issue 3, November 2008, pp. 253-270.


José Antonio Lucero. “Indigenous Political Voice and the Struggle for Recognition in Ecuador and Bolivia.” In Anthony J. Bebbington, Anis A. Dani, Arjan de Haan and Michael Walton, eds. Institutional Pathways to Equity: Addressing Inequality Traps. Washington DC: World Bank. 2008.

José Antonio Lucero. “Barricades and Articulations: Comparing Ecuadorian and Bolivian Indigenous Politics.” In Marc Becker and Kim Clark, eds. Highland Indians and the State in Modern Ecuador. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press. 2007.

José Antonio Lucero and María Elena García. “In the Shadows of Success: Indigenous Politics in Peru and Ecuador.” In Marc Becker and Kim Clark, eds. Highland Indians and the State in Modern Ecuador. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press. 2007.

José Antonio Lucero. “Fanon, Reinaga y los origenes ‘africanos’ del indianismo en los Andes.” (“Fanon, Reinaga, and the ‘African’ Origins of Indianismo in the Andes.”) In José Luis Saavedra, ed. Universidad, interculturalidad y descolonización. La Paz, Bolivia: Comité Ejecutivo de la Universidad Boliviana (CEUB) y Programa para la Investigación Estratégica Boliviana (PIEB), 2007.

José Antonio Lucero. “Representing ‘Real Indians’: The Challenges of Indigenous Authenticity and Strategic Constructivism in Ecuador and Bolivia,” Latin American Research Review, Vol. 41, No. 2, June 2006, pp. 31-56.

 

Selected Teaching Experience

University of Washington, 2008-Race, Ethnicty, Nation in Latin America, Graduate Seminar

Borderlands of Violence: Crossing Central America, Mexico, and the U.S., Undergraduate and Graduate Seminar

Cultural Politics in an Interdependent World, Undergraduate Lecture

Introduction to International Studies: Making the 21st Century, Undergraduate Lecture

Government and Politics of Latin America, Undergraduate Lecture

Social Movements in the Americas, Undergraduate and Graduate Seminar

Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 2001-2008

Core Seminar in Comparative Politics, Graduate Seminar

Comparative Politics of Developing Countries, Graduate Seminar

Latin American Politics: States, Markets, and Societies, Graduate Seminar

Foreign Governments: Introduction to Comparative Politics, Undergraduate Lecture

Race, Ethnicity and Nationalism in Politics, Undergraduate Lecture/Seminar

Social Movements: Politics, Culture, Identity, Undergraduate Honors Seminar

Democracy in Latin America, Undergraduate Lecture

Comparative Politics of Developing Countries, Undergraduate Lecture

The Politics of Democratization, Undergraduate Honors Seminar

Selected Professional Service and Related Experience

2011- Council Member, Native American and Indigenous Studies Association

2010- Chair, Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program, University of
Washington

2010- Member, Faculty Council, Jackson School of International Studies

2010- Member, Curriculum Committee, Jackson School of International
Studies

2009- Member, Editorial Board, International Journal of Critical Indigenous
Studies

2008- Faculty Advisor, Undergraduate Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Association, University of Washington

 

Professional Memberships

American Political Science Association
Cultural Studies Association
Latin American Studies Association
Native American and Indigenous Studies Association

 

Languages
English (native fluency)
Spanish (native fluency)
Italian (advanced)
Quichua (basic)