FEBRUARY 19, 2009
HENRY M. JACKSON SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

Contents
Letter from the Center
Upcoming CGS Events
Scholarship, Research & Travel Opportunities
Other Items of Interest
For Faculty

Letter from the Center

Please join us on February 27, 2009, when we host Professor Melvyn Leffler from the University of Virginia for an exciting evening of debate and discussion. The U.S. now faces stark problems: a world economic crisis; a resurgent Russia; an ambitious China; terrorism; WMD proliferation; global warming; Islamic fundamentalism; energy shortfalls; and global inequality. Can we learn anything from our experiences in the Cold War? The answer is yes, and the legacies are reassuring as well as surprising. This event is part of the Jackson School of International Studies Centennial and is free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at 7:00 PM in Kane Hall 210. For more information please go to http://jsis.washington.edu/centennial/events.shtml or contact tleonard@u.washington.edu.

Today's University Week features a terrific article about Professor Craig Jeffery's class SIS 111. Click on the link below to read the full story. http://uwnews.org/uweek/article.aspx?visitsource=uwkmail&id=47413

Please also note that faculty course development grant applications are due on February 25th. For more details, please see the Faculty section of E-News. As always, every e-news issue includes events, conference, scholarship, fellowship and employment announcements. Please scroll down to see what may be there for you. And do send us your news, announcements and ideas for e-news. Thanks!

Sara R. Curran
Associate Professor of International Studies & Public Affairs
Director, Center for Global Studies &
Chair, International Studies Program - Henry M. Jackson School
Associate Director, Center for Studies in Demography & Ecology
http://csde.washington.edu/~scurran

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Upcoming CGS Events

February 20, 2009
Gendering Conflict -- Disarming Nationalisms
6:30 PM, Kane Hall, Room 120. Speaker: Nirmala Rajasingam. Nirmala Rajasingam's courageous life story spans university education in the United States, radicalization in Sri Lanka, incarceration for her connections with the militant organization the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), subsequent disillusionment with and separation from the organization over their disregard for democracy and human rights, and relocation to London. Ms. Rajasingam continues her life of activism through work as a legal defender for refugees in Britain as well as acting as a leading member of several London-based human rights and democracy organizations including the Sri Lanka Democracy Forum and the South Asia Solidarity Group. The Veterans of Intercommunal Violence Seminar Series is designed to encourage dialogue on the relationships between combatants, conflict, peace and dialogue. Using the Sri Lanka conflict as a case study, the lecture will traverse the myriad issues that arise when war, gender, terrorism, national and ethnic identities all come crashing together. Sponsors: The Comparative History of Ideas program at UW; The Center for Global Studies at the University of Washington; The Simpson Center for the Humanities at the University of Washington; The UW South Asia Center, UW Department of Law, Society and Justice; UW Department of Sociology; UW Department of English; UW Department of Women Studies; and the South Asian Bar Association of Washington.

February 20, 2009
Russia's Northward Perspective: The Arctic Promise vs. the Siberian Curse
4:00 PM, Burke Room, Burke Museum of Natural History. Speaker: Mikhail Alexseev, Political Science, San Diego State University. With the melting of the polar ice cap, significant undiscovered oil and gas reserves may soon be accessible. The Northwest Passage shipping route between Europe and Asia, 5,000 miles shorter than the Panama Canal route, will soon be possible. Who has rights to the resources laying under the seabed? Is the Northwest Passage an "international strait," or, as Canada claims, "internal waters?" What about the Inuit claim that sea ice constitutes traditional territory? Recently, a British think-tank warned that if the "race of the Arctic" is not resolved, the potential for a polar war is a real possibility. This lecture series will address the growing international dispute over who owns the Arctic from the perspective of the Arctic nations. Sponsored by the Canadian StudiesCenter, the Center for West European Studies, the Center for Russia, East European and Central Asian Studies, Foreign Affairs Canada, the Center for Global Studies, and Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies. For more information go to http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/outreach/arctic.shtml

February 20-21, 2009
States of Violence: Representations of Conflict in Film, Fiction, and Media of South Asia
8:30 AM - 8:30 PM, Walker Ames Room, Kane Hall 225. A Conference hosted by The Clowes Centre for Conflict and Dialogue, Comparative History of Ideas Program (CHID). University of Washington, Seattle. The following sponsors have provided generous support for these events: The Comparative History of Ideas program at UW; The Center for Global Studies at the University of Washington; The Simpson Center for the Humanities at the University of Washington; The UW South Asia Center, UW Department of Law, Society and Justice; UW Department of Sociology; UW Department of English; UW Department of Women Studies; and the South Asian Bar Association of Washington. For more information please contact CHID at 206-685-4716.

February 25, 2009
Afghanistan on our Mind and in the Classroom
4:00 PM - 7:30 PM, UW Communications Building, Auditorium 120. Speaker: Cabeiri Robinson. She will be delivering a brief historical and cultural overview of Afghanistan. She will then focus on the major ethnic groups and regions of Afghanistan in the 20th century. Finally, she will discuss how the armed conflicts of the 80s and 90s changed the socio-cultural landscape of Afghanistan to help us understand the Afghanistan of 2009. Special note: this evening will also feature guest speakers from Afghanistan and/or Americans who have worked there. Also included is: Afghan food, three clock hours, and up-to-date teaching resources. Don't miss this! The Registration fee is $30. Please pre-register by 2/23/09. For more information and to register go to http://www.world-affairs.org/calendar.cfm?eventID=1084&action=eventDetails or call the Council at 206-441-5910. Sponsored by the World Affairs Council, Global Classroom and the Center for Global Studies.

February 26, 2009
Globalization and Climate Change: Challenges in the New Maritime Arctic
7:00 PM, Room 210, Kane Hall. Speaker: Lawson Brigham, US Arctic Research Commission, Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment. With the melting of the polar ice cap, significant undiscovered oil and gas reserves may soon be accessible. The Northwest Passage shipping route between Europe and Asia, 5,000 miles shorter than the Panama Canal route, will soon be possible. Who has rights to the resources laying under the seabed? Is the Northwest Passage an "international strait," or, as Canada claims, "internal waters?" What about the Inuit claim that sea ice constitutes traditional territory? Recently, a British think-tank warned that if the "race of the Arctic" is not resolved, the potential for a polar war is a real possibility. This lecture series will address the growing international dispute over who owns the Arctic from the perspective of the Arctic nations. Sponsored by the Canadian Studies Center, the Center for West European Studies, the Center for Russia, East European and Central Asian Studies, Foreign Affairs Canada, the Center for Global Studies, and Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies. For more information go to http://psc.apl.washington.edu/Arctic_Lecture_2009/

February 27, 2009
Contemporary Dilemmas and Cold War Lessons
7:00 PM, Room 210, Kane Hall. Speaker: Melvyn Leffler, University of Virginia. The US now faces stark problems: a world economic crisis; a resurgent Russia; an ambitious China; terrorism; WMD proliferation; global warming; Islamic fundamentalism; energy shortfalls; and global inequality. Can we learn anything from our experiences in the Cold War? The answer is yes, and the legacies are reassuring as well as surprising. For more information please visit http://jsis.washington.edu/centennial/events.shtml.

February 27, 2009
World Languages Day
8:00 AM - 2:30 PM. Learn about languages at the UW. Visit classes in many different languages. Sample a variety of cultures. Attend presentations and activities on a wide variety of cultural topics. Learn about careers using world languages. Visit the Language Learning Center. Partial funding for World Languages Day comes from the Outreach Centers at the Jackson School of International Studies and the College of Arts and Sciences. For more information please visit http://www.outreach.washington.edu/k12/wld/#overview or contact wld@extn.washington.edu.

February 27, 2009
Organizational Theory and Homeland Security
Speaker: Lynn Eden, Acting Co-Director, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Freeman Spogli, Institute for International Studies, Stanford University. Discussant: Kristan Seibel, PhD student, UW. UWISC is sponsored by UW Institute for National Security Education and Research (INSER), the Center for Global Studies at the Jackson School of International Studies, and the Department of Political Science. For more information visit: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/Conferences/UWISC.html.

March 6, 2009
Indispensable Allies: Indigenous Forces and Counterinsurgency Operations
Speaker: Yoav Gortzak, Assistant Professor, Political Science, Arizona State University. Discussant: TBA, Ph.D. student, UW. UWISC is sponsored by UW Institute for National Security Education and Research (INSER), the Center for Global Studies at the Jackson School of International Studies, and the Department of Political Science. For more information visit http://www.polisci.washington.edu/Conferences/UWISC.html.

March 7, 2009
K-8 Arts Mosaic
University of Washington, Seattle Campus. As part of National Arts Education Month in March, join the Jackson School Outreach Centers for the 2008 Mosaic workshop, to learn hands-on arts and crafts projects that can be combined with K-8 social studies and other curriculum to teach about the world’s cultures. This year’s theme emphasis movement and sound integration across the curriculum and will feature the La Calebasse Dance Troupe. Sponsored by the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Outreach. For more information go to http://jsis.washington.edu/seac/calendar.shtml.

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Scholarship, Research & Travel Opportunities

Mortar Board Alumni / Tolo Foundation Eleanor M. Hadley Scholarship for JSIS Grads and Undergrads
Deadline: March 2, 2009
Normally one scholarship is awarded. As with other Mortar Boards scholarships, selection will be based on academic achievement, leadership, and service to the campus and community. In the case of the Hadley Scholarship, however, the primary qualification is excellence in the study of international relations.

The recipient must be a JSIS sophomore, junior, senior, or graduate student during the 2009-2010 academic year, and enrolled at the University of Washington in that year. Finalists must be available for a personal interview on campus on April 15th or 16th. The recipient may not be related to a past or present director or employee or the Mortar Board Alumni/Tolo Foundation.

To be considered, each applicant must complete a Mortar Board Scholarship Application Form and provide the required information. An application and detailed instructions are available in the Office of Student Services, Thomson 111. All applications and supporting materials must be submitted to the Office of Student Services no later than Monday, March 2, 2009. A Jackson School committee will choose finalists whose applications will be forwarded to the Mortar Board Alumni/Tolo Foundation by its March 20 deadline.

Thomas Francis, Jr. Global Health Fellowship
Deadline: March 11, 2009
The purpose of this fellowship is to promote global health by providing financial assistance to graduate or professional students who would like to gain practical global health field experience in international and/or underserved community settings. Dr. Thomas Francis, Jr. taught Dr. Jonas Salk the methodology of vaccine development, and designed and directed the Salk polio vaccine clinical trials. The Fellowship is administered by the Department of Global Health in conjunction with a faculty selection committee and the Dean’s Office of the School of Public Health. Eligible students may be enrolled in any graduate or professional school at the University of Washington, and must submit a project proposal that addresses a global health issue or problem. Projects should be one to three months in length. And must be completed by the end of Winter Quarter 2010. The Fellowship of up to $4000 USD can be used to support student travel costs, but cannot be used to cover tuition, school supplies, conferences or other non-project related expenses. For any other questions e-mail Daren Wade at dwade@u.wahington.edu.

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Other Items of Interest  

Academic Fellows Anti-Terrorism Program
Deadline: March 27, 2009
The Foundation for the Defense of Democracies is accepting applications for its annual Academic Fellows anti-terrorism program. This unique program which provides university professors with a detailed understanding of the terror threat that faces our nation and sister democracies is centered on a 10-day course taught in conjunction with Tel Aviv University. The program takes place entirely in Israel and runs May 30th to June 10th, 2009. Participants interact with academics, diplomats, military and intelligence officials, and politicians from Israel, Jordan, India, Turkey and the United States. They also visit military bases, border zones and other security installations to learn the practical side of deterring terrorist attacks. All expenses are paid by FDD. For more information please contact the assistant program coordinator at dana@defenddemocracy.org.

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For Faculty

Reminder, Center for Global Studies course development grant applications are due on February 25, 2009. The Center's activities are organized around the twin themes of Global Security and Global Religions. As part of this effort we will support developing new courses and altering the contents of existing courses to incorporate each of these themes.

The Center will offer grants to support course development in these two areas in 2008-09. Only full time UW faculty members can apply. We are soliciting applications from all divisions of UW, including the various professional schools. Please contact Tamara Leonard, Associate Director, for more details. Applications should be submitted to Center for Global Studies/JSIS, Box 353650, Seattle, WA 98195. If you have additional questions, please contact Tamara at 206 685-2354 or email tleonard@u.washington.edu.

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