"Religion and Human Security" (James K. Wellman, Clark Lombardi, eds) a volume made possible by a grant from the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion and International Affairs (Henry R. Luce Luce Foundation) is now available in hardcover, paperback and as an Ebook. To order see Oxford University Press.

"Religion and Human Security links two critical factors in international affairs-religion and human security-in important and novel ways, providing insight for both scholars and policymakers on how religion impacts human security. This collection of essays should be required reading for government officials who are increasingly confronted with the challenges of safeguarding human security around the world." --Steven A. Cook, Hasib J. Sabbagh Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies, Council on Foreign Relations

 

REVIEWS:

"A more balanced view of the important and multidimensional roles religion plays in local and international politics." --H-Net Reviews

"Religion and Human Security links two critical factors in international affairs-religion and human security-in important and novel ways, providing insight for both scholars and policymakers on how religion impacts human security. This collection of essays should be required reading for government officials who are increasingly confronted with the challenges of safeguarding human security around the world." --Steven A. Cook, Hasib J. Sabbagh Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies, Council on Foreign Relations

"This thoughtful book explores the multifaceted role of religion in the human security of contemporary global societies. Through arresting case studies and riveting theoretical reflections, it shows that the religious dimension of social welfare around the world is complex and interrelated. These well-honed essays reveal that while religious ideas and actors can cause much harm, they can also bring moments of healing and hope. It is a book that will be widely discussed in the fields of religion and society, public policy and global affairs." --Mark Juergensmeyer, author of Global Rebellion: Religious Challenges to the Secular State

 


 

 

About the Luce Grant 2007 - 2009

     The University of Washington's Comparative Religion program developed a two-year program, Religion and Human Security, to produce new public policy thinking about the relationship between religion, human security and national security. The program studied the ways in which religious groups in the post-cold war era affect human security and examines their impact on human security in cases when it is sufficiently strong that it plays a major role in disrupting the national security of a state. Recent funding for the Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS) has built capacity in the separate fields of Global Religions and Human Security. The Luce Grant enabled us to link these two in a way that moves the debate forward and produces new knowledge and public policy on the critical connection of religion and human security. The program included:

  1. Two Annual Conferences on Religion and Human Security where policy makers and scholars addressed the issue of religion and human security.
  2. Institute a web-published series called the Luce Papers in Religion and International Studies that will publish papers from the Visiting Fellow as well as participants in the annual conferences.

Background
     Contemporary scholars of international affairs are coming to recognize the close relationship between “national” security and “human” security. The former is concerned with the stability of a state; the latter to the welfare and quality of life its inhabitants. Religious groups have become adept at making use of the new opportunities, and have increasing power to control the human security of citizens. We address policy makers on these issues of religion and human security.

     Our program, Religion and Human Security enables us to link Global Religions and Human Security and to integrate the Comparative Religion Program (CRP) and International Studies. This has given scholars access to the public policy communities, and informed state and non-state actors as they engage the problems of religion and human security. It has educate and challenged 86 CRP majors and 20 CRP MA graduate students, the 230 JSIS undergraduates and 38 JSIS graduate students to think in new ways about the influence of religion in the world today. In the long run, the Luce Grant solidifies the JSIS aim to create a PhD program in Global Religions and to add to our faculty in these areas.

Impact on Faculty and Course Development
     
Faculty in the Comparative Religion Program are drawn from programs, departments and schools campus-wide including the Center for Global Studies, Sociology, History, Political Science, Near East Languages and Civilization, Asian Languages and Literature; Societies and Justice, and the School of Law. The Luce grant has drawn campus-wide interest which can be seen in the engagement of faculty and additional adjunct faculty who have joined the Program which now includes participants from the School of Law, Anthropology,  Law, Societies and Justice Program, and the Evans School of Public Affairs.

     The cross-pollination of curricular initiatives and course development were built-in strengths of this type of collaboration which has resulted in the institutional success of the grant. Comparative Religion is housed within the Jackson School of International Studies where evidence of the institutional commitment to the topic of Religion and Human Security within the context of International Studies can been seen in the number of related courses (SIS 390 Indian Popular Media and Religion; SIS 522 Ethnonationalist and Ethnorelgious Conflicts; SIS 590 Encounters with Religio-Political Violence; SIS 405 Political Economy of Religious Institutions; SIS 498 History, Religion, and the Modern West; SIS 406 Political Islam; SIS 523 Political/Religious Violence; SIS 498 Political Islam and Contemporary Islamist Movements).

 Public Information
    
Information about events and fora was widely disseminated on campus and off. A broad public information strategy targeted students and faculty, as well as off-campus members of the faith-based community and policy makers. Electronic list serves, public service announcements and on-line communities were used as well as the more traditional media approaches.

About the Luce Foundation
     The Henry Luce Foundation seeks to bring important ideas to the center of American life, strengthen international understanding, and foster innovation and leadership in academic, policy, religious and art communities.

     The Luce Foundation pursues its mission today through the following grant-making programs: American Art; East Asia; Luce Scholars; Theology; Higher Education and the Henry R. Luce Professorships; the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion and International Affairs; Public Policy and the Environment; and the Clare Boothe Luce Program for women in science, mathematics and engineering.

     The Luce Foundation was established in 1936 by Henry R. Luce, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Time Inc., to honor his parents who were missionary educators in China. The Foundation builds upon the vision and values of four generations of the Luce family: broadening knowledge and encouraging the highest standards of service and leadership. A not-for-profit corporation, the Luce Foundation operates under the laws of the State of New York and aims to exemplify the best practices of responsible, effective philanthropy.

 

 

Religion and Human Security
University of Washington
Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-4835 office
(206) 685-0668 fax