September 2014 | October 2014 | November 2014 | December 2014 | June 2015 | archive and advance search

Jackson School Calendar of Events

For more events you can view each center or program's events page or go to the archive and advanced search link above. You can subscribe to our events mailing list here:
http://mailman13.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/jsis-uw

This Week

Click on the title for more details.

All Events


September 2014
UW Myanmar Fellows Looking Forward: Information Strategies for a Society in Transition

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

Southeast Asia Center

Thursday September 4, 2014
11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Ethnic & Cultural Center, UW, 3931 Brooklyn Ave. NE, Seattle

UW Myanmar Fellows

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and the Information School's Technology & Social Change Group

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/uw-myanmar-fellows-looking-forward-information-strategies-for-a-society-in-transition-tickets-12871654465

This summer, the University of Washington hosted 25 of Myanmar’s leaders from government, civil society, political parties, ethnic communities, libraries, and the media. The fellows took part in a 5-week professional development program focused on information strategies for societies in transition. During the 5 weeks, they developed information strategies for Myanmar that will strengthen peace building, fair elections, and information literacy.

These distinguished individuals and the UW-Myanmar project team invite you to join them for a lunch reception where you can learn about their proposed projects and the plans for a Myanmar Information Laboratory. There will be a brief welcome at noon, followed by time for guests to visit the project teams and learn about each project. At 1:30pm, we will formally present the fellows with certificates acknowledging their accomplishments during the 5-week workshop.

UW Myanmar Fellows Looking Forward is co-hosted by the UW's Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Information School's Technology & Social Change Group.

To learn more about the UW Fellows and the program, please visit our program website.

The program is supported by USAID, Microsoft, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The program is housed in the University of Washington’s Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and is run in collaboration with the Technology & Social Change Group in the University of Washington’s Information School, Myanmar Egress Capacity Development Centre, and the Myanmar Minerva Educational Centre.


add to google calendar
return to top


A Polish Perspective on Europe and the USA

Ellison Center

Thursday September 4, 2014
12:30pm-2:00pm
University of Washington Thomson Hall Room 317

Mariusz M. Brymora, Consul General of the Republic of Poland in Los Angeles

The Ellison Center

The year 2014 is particularly significant for Poland. Twenty-five years ago, the first democratic elections took place on June 4, 1989 resulting in an overwhelming victory of the “Solidarity” movement.This marked the end of the Communist regime and the transition to democracy in Poland and Europe. This year, Poland is also observing the 15th anniversary of joining NATO and the 10th anniversary of joining the European Union. Today, Poland is becoming an increasingly important political and economic player in Europe, and is establishing its place on the geopolitical map of the world.

Mariusz Brymora was nominated as the Consul General of the Republic of Poland in Los Angeles in 2013. Previously, he served as the Polish Consul in Chicago and the public affairs councillor of the Embassy of Poland in Washington, D.C. He has also worked as the deputy director of the Department of Public and Cultural Diplomacy of the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Warsaw.

He is an experienced diplomat, an educator and author well qualified to address current issues in Poland as well as the Polish-American relations.


add to google calendar
return to top


"Indigenous Ways of Knowing Cultural Food Practices and Ecological Knowledge" in Canada and the US

Canadian Studies Center

Friday September 26, 2014 to Saturday September 27, 2014

University of Washington, Seattle

Canadian Studies Center

Canada@uw.edu, clotise@uw.edu

The University of Washington’s American Indian Studies Department invites you to a two-day symposium to be held September 26 and 27, 2014 in the Center for Urban Horticulture, University of Washington, Seattle campus.

“The Living Breath of Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ: Indigenous Ways of Knowing Cultural Food Practices and Ecological Knowledge,” will bring together will bring together individuals to share their knowledge and expertise on topics such as tribal food sovereignty initiatives, food justice and security, traditional foods and health, indigenous foods systems and global climate change, and treaty water and fishing rights.

Indigenous peoples in the Northwest have maintained a sustainable way of life through a cultural, spiritual, and reciprocal relationship with their environment. This symposium will serve to foster dialogue and build collaborative networks as we, Native peoples, strive to sustain our cultural food practices and preserve our healthy relationship to the land, water, and all living things.

This symposium honors the UW’s future longhouse-style community building, Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ (a Lushootseed word meaning Intellectual House), that will open its doors in February, 2015. This event symbolizes the spirit of Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ and embodies the essence of the work we envision doing in this cultural and intellectual space.


For more information contact Charlotte Coté at clotise@uw.edu.

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN:

To get the EARLY BIRD PRICE PLEASE REGISTER NOW: 125.00 for two days and 75.00 for one day. Please register before 12PM on Friday, September 12, 2014. After that the late registration fee is 140.00 per two days and 90.00 per day. Registration will close September 23. After September 23 you must register with the conference on the first day to attend. We urge you to register early here: https://www.regonline.com/register/login.aspx?eventID=1596396&MethodId=0&EventsessionId=! Our seats will fill quickly.

Registration includes a continental breakfast, local, organic traditional foods lunch, and coffee/tea for both days.

SPECIALS: In honor of the Northwest Indian College's “Our Food is our Medicine” conference taking place September 24-26th, their participants can attend our conference for a reduced rate. Our conference is free for students with UW ID subject to available seating. Elders (65 and older) are free and subject to available seating. NWIC participants, UW students, and elders need to Dian Million or register at the door. For all registration questions please email Dian Million with “conference registration” in the subject line: dianm@uw.edu, or leave a message at (206) 543-9082.


Charlotte Coté (Nuu-chah-nulth), Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of American Indian Studies
Chair, Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ Intellectual House Planning and Advisory Committee
Affiliated Faculty, Canadian Studies Center,
Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Box 354305, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195
Phone: (206)221-6549, Fax: (206)616-3122

Planning Committee:
Dr. Charlotte Coté, (chair), Dr. Dian Million, Clarita Lefthand Begay, Michelle Montgomery, Susan Balbas, Michelle Daigle, and Melissa Woodrow.
 


add to google calendar
return to top
October 2014
Comparative Religion Annual Lecture

Comparative Religion

Thursday October 16, 2014
7:30 PM
Kane Hall, room 110

Prof. Randall Balmer, Dartmouth College

Comparative Religion Program

lpaxton@uw.edu

 Prof. Balmer will speak on, "Redeemer: The Life of Jimmy Carter and The Making of Evangelicalism: From Revivalism to Politics and Beyond."

(His book, Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: A Journey into the Evangelical Subculture in America, now in its fourth edition, was made into an award-winning, three-part documentary for PBS.)


add to google calendar
return to top


From the Lowly Lubok to Soviet Realism: Early Twentieth Century Children's Books from Russia

Ellison Center

Monday June 30, 2014 to Friday October 24, 2014

Allen Library

UW Libraries, Special Collections

Allen Library

This exhibition in Special Collections, curated by Pamela K. Harer, brings together rare and scarce Russian children’s books from early in the 20th century and represents some of the most striking book design and illustration known to the field. Most of the books included date from between the two World Wars, during the period of the Russian Revolution and were considered “a major weapon for education.” See the work of Pakhomov, Konashevich, Lebedev and Lissitzky. The names of the artists may be unfamiliar but the images and design elements are unforgettable.

For more information visit:
http://www.lib.washington.edu/about/news/exhibits/calendar?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D110479136


add to google calendar
return to top
November 2014
Domination, Integration, and Betrayal

Jackson School Information

Wednesday November 5, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

Raymond Jonas

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

  

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures


The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.


In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.


Part 1: Domination, Integration, and Betrayal
The Great War signaled the terminal crisis of the European old regime–a crisis more than a century in the making. Pursuing the story of this crisis across themes of domination, integration, and betrayal, Professor Jonas will consider the rivalries that underpinned the war and the bleak geopolitical thinking that informed them. Jonas will explore the political culture that obliterated tolerance for difference, finding the foundations of power in nation and race. Finally, he will ask us to ponder the responsibilities of the powerful, viewed with the eyes of the young men they had persuaded to fight.

Raymond Jonas is a Professor of History at the University of Washington. His most recent book is The Battle of Adwa: African Victory in the Age of Empire. He is currently working on European expansion into postindependence Latin America.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.


add to google calendar
return to top


Natural and Unnatural Disasters: 3/11, Asbestos, and the Unmaking of Japanís Modern World

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday November 7, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Loctaion TBD

Prof. Brett Walker

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

  The massive earthquake of 2011 unleashed a tsunami that swept away entire communities. Along with an enduring nuclear legacy, it also left an estimated 25 millions tons of rubble, much of it contaminated with asbestos and other carcinogenic toxins. Indeed, the unnatural disaster of cleaning up Japan’s pulverized and aerosolized built environment remained. This talk investigates asbestos in the construction and, more importantly, destruction of Japan’s built environment, with a focus on the impact of the 3/11 disaster and the later clean up. (Part of a larger Guggenheim-funded project concerned with the unmaking of the modern built world, and what it means for the future of human health.)

Brett L. Walker is Regents Professor and Michael P. Malone Professor of History at Montana State University, Bozeman. His research and teaching interests include Japanese history, world environmental history, and the history of science and medicine. He is author of The Conquest of Ainu Lands: Ecology and Culture in Japanese Expansion, 1590-1800, The Lost Wolves of Japan, Toxic Archipelago: A History of Industrial Disease in Japan, and the forthcoming A Concise History of Japan, from Cambridge University Press. He has also co-edited two volumes. He spends most of his time in southwestern Montana and the San Juan Islands, where he enjoys the outdoors.


add to google calendar
return to top


From Empires to Nation States

Jackson School Information

Wednesday November 12, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

Devin Naar

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

 

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures


The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.


In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.


Part 2: From Empires to Nation-States
The Great War irrevocably transformed the map of Europe and the Middle East by provoking the dissolution of the major empires of the Hapsburgs, Romanovs, and Ottomans. This lecture will focus on the final years of the Ottoman Empire, the role of the war in galvanizing new nation-states in the region, and the cataclysmic impact of these processes on diverse populations. Professor Naar will also explain how issues at stake in 1914 continue to echo today in the lands of the former Ottoman empire.


Devin E. Naar is a Professor of History, the Marsha and Jay Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies, and Chair of the Sephardic Studies Program at the University of Washington. He teaches courses on Jewish history, the Ottoman Empire, and Greece, and is completing a book about the city of Salonica.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.


add to google calendar
return to top


Home Fronts and Battle Fronts

Jackson School Information

Wednesday November 19, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

Jordanna Bailkin

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

  

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures


The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.
In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.

Part 3: Home Fronts and Battle Fronts
One of the most enduring concepts that we associate with the Great War is the idea of diametrically opposed “home fronts” and “battle fronts.” Many of those who waged the war—and those who wrote about it afterwards—upheld this distinction between the bloody, scarred world of the men in the trenches and the sacred preserve of women and children non-combatants. Professor Bailkin’s lecture will look more closely at the idea of home fronts and battle fronts, considering the ways in which the Great War generated, but also ultimately challenged the idea of an absolute divide between the worlds of soldiers and civilians.

Jordanna Bailkin is the Giovanni and Amne Costigan Endowed Professor in European History at the University of Washington, where she teaches classes on British, European, and imperial history. She is the author, most recently, of the prize-winning book, The Afterlife of Empire. She is currently writing a book about refugee camps in Britain.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.
 


add to google calendar
return to top
December 2014
Cultural Death and Radical Hope

Jackson School Information

Wednesday December 3, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

John Toews

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

 

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures

The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.
In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.

Part 4: Cultural Death and Radical Hope
By tracing the post- 1914 transformation of the legacy of philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, Professor Toews will examine how the critical intellectual traditions of the central European fin-de-siècle were recreated and transfigured in the shadow of catastrophe. Toews will place Nietzsche’s legacy in the context of contemporaneous developments within the intellectual traditions of Marxism and psychoanalysis, showing how disillusionment with the foundational myths of Western humanism and historicism produced widespread commitment to the radical cultural construction of a “New Man” and new “World Order,” a commitment that ultimately culminated in the fascist regimes of the 1920s and 1930s.

John Toews is the Joff Hanauer Distinguished University Professor for Western Civilization and Professor of History and the Comparative History of Ideas. He teaches courses in modern European intellectual history and his most recent book is Becoming Historical:Cultural Reformation and Public Memory in Early Nineteenth-Century Berlin. He is currently finishing a book on the early history of psychoanalysis.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.


add to google calendar
return to top
June 2015
STUDY CANADA Summer Institute - Across the Salish Sea: Canada-US Connections in the Pacific Northwest

Canadian Studies Center

Monday June 22, 2015 to Friday June 26, 2015

Seattle, WA to Victoria, BC

Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada, Canadian Studies Center, UW, and Canadian American Center at Western Washington University

canada@uw.edu

The US today faces unprecedented demand for globally competent citizens and professionals. To this end, U.S. Department of Education Title VI grants support language training programs and area studies, including Canada, so that students learn more about the world and transnational trend. The U.S.D.O.E.-designated Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada offers the STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators annually to provide American educators with an excellent foundation for teaching about our vital political, economic, environmental and cultural relationships with Canada. For more than 35 years, teachers from every state have learned about core social studies topics related to Canada—such as geography, history, government, and economics—from university faculty and other experts. Important outcomes have always included gaining global perspectives of civic issues, receiving numerous resources for classroom use, and developing curricula that meet Common Core, C3 and state standards.

Registration opens November 1, 2014 and closes May 1, 2015 (or earlier, if maximum of 20 reached). See attached handout for additional details, visit www.k12studycanada.org/scsi.html for latest updates,​ or contact tina.storer@wwu.edu for further information. Flyer and registration info 


add to google calendar
return to top