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2008 Archive

January 25: "Institutional Competitivesness and the Global Economy: The Danish Miracle," John Campbell, Dartmouth College, 3:30-5:00 pm, Condon Hall 311. John L. Campbell is the Class of 1925 Professor of Sociology at Dartmouth College, Professor of Political Economy at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark and Adjunct Professor of Political Science at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. His research and teaching interests include political, economic and comparative sociology, institutional analysis, globalization, and organizations. His recent publications include National Identity and the Varieties of Capitalism, The Danish Experience and The Rise of Neoliberalism and Institutional Analysis. For more information, contact the Center for West European Studies at 206-543-1675, or email cwes@u.washington.edu.

February 4: "Regionalization and Retrenchment: The Impact of European Integration on the Welfare State," Jason Beckfield, Harvard University, 1:00-2:30 pm, Peterson Room, Allen Library. Two central questions have sparked much debate over the European welfare state. Is there evidence of long-anticipated retrenchment? If so, is globalization the cause? This presentation redirects these debates by showing that there is evidence of retrenchment in Europe, and that regional integration - not globalization - accounts for it. Regional integration is conceptualized as the construction of supranational political economy in negotiated and bounded regions through political institutionalization and market expansion. Regional political integration should constrain the welfare state through policy feedbacks, the politics of blame avoidance, and the adoption of classical-liberal policy scripts, while regional economic integration should constrain the welfare state by expanding labor markets and undermining labor unions. These arguments are assessed with time-series cross-section models and data from 13 European Union (EU) and non-EU states. The results show that (1) there is evidence of retrenchment, (2) regionalization is significantly associated with retrenchment, and (3) the effect of regional integration is dampened in the strongest welfare states. For more information, contact the Center for West European Studies at 206-543-1675, or email cwes@u.washington.edu.

February 14: Deadline for application and abstract to "Europe, Globalization and Sustainability," Claremont-UC Undergraduate Research Conference on the European Union, April 17-18 at Scripps College in Claremont, CA. Sponsored by the Institute of European Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, BYU Center for the Study of Europe, the Ira and Mary Lou Fulton Chair and the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies at BYU and the European Union Center of Excellence.

February 17: "The Gates of Paradise: Lorenzo Ghiberti's Renaissance Masterpiece," Chiyo Ishikawa, Seattle Art Museum Susan Brotman Deputy Director of Art and Curator of European Art and Sculpture, 2:00 pm, Walker-Ames Room, Kane Hall, University of Washington campus, Seattle. For more information, contact French & Italian Studies at 206-616-3486 or by emailing frenital@u.washington.edu.

February 22-23: 2008 West Coast Model EU, University of Washington, Seattle. For more information, see the Model EU website.

March 2-3: "War and Democracy: The Domestic Political Consequences of International Conflict," University of Washington, Seattle.

March 8: "Europe After 1945: Resources Beyond the Textbook," EU Center session at the Annual Washington State Council for the Social Studies Leadership Retreat at Chelan. Pre-registration is required. For more information, visit http://www.wscss.org.

March 8: "Taller" on Spanish Theater for secondary teachers of Spanish. Registration for the "taller" will begin on February 15, 2008. For more information contact the Center for Spanish Studies at 206-221-6571 or email spnrectr@uw.edu.

March 14: "Collaboration & Conflict: The EU-US Partnership," talk by John Bruton, EU Ambassador to the United States. 10:00 am, Henry Art Gallery Auditorium, University of Washington, Seattle Campus. This talk is free and open to the public.

March 14-15: Performances of "El entremes del retablo de las maravillas," "El entremes de los romances," and "La loa para el auto sacramental de 'El Divino Narciso,'" Ethnic Cultural Theater. Tickets available through HUB Ticket Office beginning in February, $12 adult/ $8 student. For more information, call 206-543-2277.

March 22: "Hands on the World: Connecting Crafts and Cultures in the K-8 Curriculum," Educator workshop, Thomson Hall, University of Washington, Seattle.

March 30: "Ghiberti and Gelato," Private docent-led tours of the upcoming Seattle Art Museum exhibits, "The Gates of Paradise" and "Roman Art from the Louvre," 12:00 pm & 1:30 pm, $40 per adult, $20 per child, Seattle Art Museum. For more information, contact French & Italian Studies at 206-616-3486 or frenital@u.washington.edu. For more information about SAM's exhibitions, please visit http://www.seattleartmuseum.org.

March 30: 8th Annual Documentary Film Workshop, "Teaching Diversity & Cross-Cultural Understanding throuh Documentary Film, for high school, community college and in-service educators," 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., $45 (includes 8 clock hours, continental breakfast and lunch), University of Washington, Seattle. This workshop will introduce educators to documntary films that can be used to teach students about cultural diversity and cross-cultural understanding. This year's workshop will feature films dealing with issues in Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Canada. For more information, contact Canadian Studies at 206-221-6374.

April 2: "Russia, the European Union and the US: Soul Mates?," Darryl Johnson, former US Ambassador, 7:00 p.m., Walker Ames Room, Kane Hall, University of Washington, Seattle. This talk is part of the Hot Spots lecture series. For more information, contact Canadian Studies at 206-221-6374.

April 4: "Redeeming Jews: Sephardic Intermediaries in the Early Modern Mediterranean," Gillian Weiss, Case Western University, 12:00 p.m., Thomson Hall 317, University of Washington, Seattle. This series is sponsored by the University of Washington's Jewish Studies Program, Departments of History, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Near Eastern Languages and Civilization, Comparative Literature, and Spanish & Portuguese, Middle East Center and Center for West European Studies of the Jackson School, Division of French & Italian Studies, and Simpson Center for the Humanities.

April 8: "Mass Culture or Counter-Culture? Czech Catholicism and American Catholicism: A Comparison of Their Social, Cultural, and Political Situation and Impact," Martin Putna, Professor, Charles University, Czech Republic, 3:30 - 5:00 pm, Smith 405. A look at the historical background and present situation of Catholicism in both the Czech Republic and the U.S., addressing issues such as the role of the Church in politics, the split between liberals and conservatives, and the rise of non-ecclesial religiousity. Martin Putna is a literary historian and docent in comparative literature at Charles University. He is the author of a number of scholarly works, including a study of Czech Catholic literature from 1848-1918. Putna is presently in the United States as a Fulbright Scholar at the Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life at Boston College, where he is studying non-fundamentalist Christian thinkers and writers in the U.S.

April 16: "Tax Protest in European Welfare States," Isaac Martin, University of California, San Diego, 3:30 pm, Condon Hall 311, University of Washington, Seattle. This talk is part of the Center for West European Studies Politics and Society Colloquium series. For more information, contact the Center for West European Studies at 206-543-1675 or via email at cwes@u.washington.edu.

April 16: "The China-Taiwan-US Triangle," David Bachman, Associate Director and Professor of International Studies, 7:00 p.m., Walker Ames Room, Kane Hall, University of Washington, Seattle. This talk is part of the Hot Spots lecture series. For more information, contact Canadian Studies at 206-221-6374.

April 17: "The Economic Feasibility of Comprehensive Welfare States in a Comparative Perspective," Heiner Gansmann, Free University, Berlin, Germany, 1:30 pm, Sieg Hall 226, University of Washington, Seattle. This talk is part of the Center for West European Studies Politics and Society Colloquium series. For more information, contact the Center for West European Studies at 206-543-1675 or via email at cwes@u.washington.edu.

April 26: Jackson School International Knowledge Bowl! Thomson Hall 101, 10:30 am - 12:00 pm. As part of Washington Weekend, the Jackson School invites you to test your global IQ in a fun interactive knowledge bowl sponsored by the Outreach Centers of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. Professor Wolf Latsch will host this educational and entertaining 90 minute session covering topics from geography and history to current events and political figures. All ages are encouraged to participate. Don't miss the fun, prizes will be awarded! For more information on this Jackson School event please contact Allison Dvaladze at dvaladze@u.washington.edu or call 206-221-7951. For more information on Washington Weekend, contact the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or email uwalumni@u.washington.edu.

April 29 - May 9: "Europe Contested," Canadian Interdisciplinary Summer School on Europe and Germany, the Institute for European Studies at the University of British Columbia. Jointly organized by the UBC Institute for European Studies and the Canadian Centre for German and European Studies at York University, Le Centre canadien d'etudes allemandes et europeenne at Universite Montreal and with the financial support of the German Academic Exchange Service, this year's interdisciplinary summer school for graduate students will deal with the economic, political, and cultureal challenges of a Europe in flux. Renowned scholars from Canada and Europe will analyze the pressing problems of confronting Europe. Ranging from migration and the multi-faceted aspects of security policies in an age of terrorism to the area of domestic and foreign economic policy as well as national identity policies, the summer school will present in-depth analyses and offer the opportunity to network with faculty and graduate students from all over Canada as well as from Europe. For more information, visit http://www.ies.ubc.ca/ or contact Dr. Kurt Huebner by emailing kurt.huebner@ubc.ca.

April 30: "Revolution's Aftermath: Twenty Years of Polish Democracy," Adam Michnik, Editor-in-chief, Gazeta Wyborcza, 7:00 pm, Kane Hall 220, University of Washington, Seattle. Adam Michnik, a former dissident, and one of Europe's leading journalists, has been Editor-in-Chief of Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland's first independent daily newspaper, since its inception in 1989. A life-long activist for human rights, he spent a total of six years in prison between 1965 and 1986 for his opposition to the communist regime. As a longtime advisor to Solidarity, Michnik participated in the Roundtable negotiations that ended communist rule in Poland and was subsequently elected to Poland's first non-communist parliament in 1989. He has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award in 1986, the OSCE Prize for Journalism and Democracy in 1996 and, most recently in 2006, the Dan David Prize for being the journalist most associated with the collapse of the Soviet bloc and the rise of freedom in Eastern Europe. This event is sponsored by The Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Center for West European Studies, The EU Center of Excellence, UW Polish Studies Endowment Committee, The Graduate School, Department of History, Baltic Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and The Evans School of Public Affairs. For more information call 206-543-4852 or email reecas@u.washington.edu.

April 30: "Pushing States' Rights? Reforming Federal Structures in Germany," Werner Reutter, Humboldt University, Berlin, 11:30 am, Thomson Hall 235, University of Washington, Seattle. One of the most important goals of the reform of the federal system in 2006 was to restructure legislation. At the level of the central state the reform was to make legislation more efficient and transparent and the legislative procedure less time-consuming. In addition, legislative competencies of the central state have been transferred to the Laender level in order to reduce the veto-power of the federal council and infuse competitive elements into a system that used to be rightfully coined cooperative federalism. Finally, in a number of areas the Laender received the right to deviate from federal regulations by adopting their own laws. The talk will bring some shortcomings of this reform to the fore. It shows that the changes adopted in 2006 will at best partly realize what the reform was supposed to accomplish. For more information call 206-616-2415 or email euc@u.washington.edu.

April 30: "Polygamy and Empire: Civilizing the Jewish Family in Colonial Algeria," Joshua Schreier, Vassar College, 1:30 pm, Thomson Hall 317, University of Washington, Seattle. This series is sponsored by the University of Washington's Jewish Studies Program, Departments of History, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Near Eastern Languages and Civilization, Comparative Literature, and Spanish & Portuguese, Middle East Center and Center for West European Studies of the Jackson School, Division of French & Italian Studies, and Simpson Center for the Humanities.

May 1 - 2: "The European Union After Enlargement: Policies and Politics in a New Context," University of Washington, Seattle.

May 5: "Why and How Does the EU Become (More) Democratic?," Frank Schimmelfennig, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, 12:30-2:00 pm, Gowen 001A, University of Washington, Seattle. This is a brown bag lunch. For more information, contact the European Union Center of Excellence at 206-616-2415 or via email at euc@u.washington.edu.

May 8: "Flying High: How Open Skies Benefits US Travelers and Businesses," Luc Veron, Minister Counselor for Political Affairs European Commission Delegation to the United States, 7:30 - 9:00 am, World Trade Center Seattle (2200 Alaskan Way). The EU-U.S. Air Transport Agreement, commonly referred to as the "Open Skies Agreement," signed in 2007, will come into force at the end of March, enhancing competition in the transatlantic air travel market by allowing American and European airlines to fly between any EU and any US destination. The agreement has been predicted to result in 26 million additional passengers crossing the Atlantic, generate more than $25 billion in benefits for consumers, and create 80,000 new jobs in the EU and the US over a five-year period. The impact of the Open Skies Agreement can already be seen in some of the plans US and European airlines have made to expand transatlantic services, including the new Northwest/KLM direct service between Seattle and London-Heathrow. Luc Veron from the European Commission Delegation in Washington will discuss how this agreement will benefit European and US businesses and consumers, and how upcoming EU-US negotiations may lead to further liberalization.

May 9: "Europe Day: The Historical Impact of European Integration," Luc Veron, Minister Counselor for Political Affairs European Commission Delegation to the United States, 2:00-3:30 pm, Parrington Hall Forum, University of Washington, Seattle. For more information, please call the European Union Center of Excellence at 206-616-2415 or email euc@u.washington.edu.

May 19: "Our Ancestors the Sighted: Making Blind People French and French People Blind, 1750-1991," Catherine Kudlick, UC Davis History Department, 1:30 pm, Balmer Hall 212, University of Washington, Seattle. This talk uses a 1991 book designed to teach blind people the principles of architecture as a point of departure to explore the intersections among disability studies and post-colonialism in the aftermath of the French Enlightenment. This talk is part of the Center for West European Studies Culture Colloqium and is sponsored by CWES and the Departments of History and French and Italian Studies. For more information, please call the Center for West European Studies at 206-543-1675 or email cwes@u.washington.edu.

May 27: "Populist Radical Right Parties of Europe," Cas Mudde, University of Antwerp, Belgium, 12:00 pm, Communications Building 202, Simpson Center of the Humanities, University of Washington, Seattle. This talk is sponsored by the Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies and the Center for West European Studies.

June 9: "Cultural Capital and Stratification in Contemporary Britain," Mike Savage, University of Manchester, United Kingdom, 2:30-4:00 pm, Condon Hall 311, University of Washington, Seattle. This talk will report findings from the most extensive survey of cultural taste and participation in the areas of music, reading, visual arts, television and film, sports ever conducted in the UK. Multiple correspondence analysis is used to develop a 'cultural map' which shows the existence of contested cultural field especially with respect to music and the visual arts. Savage argues that the concept of the 'cultural omnivore' developed by Peterson and his associates needs to be elaborated and radicalized to recognize the continued existence of key 'fault lines' in cultural taste which are rarely crossed. This talk is part of the Center for West European Studies Politics and Society Colloquium series. For more information, contact the Center for West European Studies at 206-543-1675 or via email at cwes@u.washington.edu.

June 25 - 26: "Life Cycle Rituals and Traditions across Cultures," 2008 Jackson School of International Studies Summer Seminar for Educators, Grades 6 and Up, University of Washington, Seattle campus. This year's summer seminar for educators will focus on the major rites and rituals that underpin cultures around the world and that create community identity. With presentations featuring anthropologists, sociologists, historians, and political scientists, this seminar will also encourage teacher-participants as they work together designing classroom strategies centered on the seminar's theme. This two-day seminar is designed for middle school, high school, and community college educators. The registration deadline is June 20, 2008. For more information, please contact Felicia Hecker at 206-543-4227 or via email at fhecker@u.washington.edu.

August 15-21: "Godard's '60s," SIFF Film Series. Modern film was born in the 1960s and Jean-Luc Godard was its father. For one pivotal decade, this founding father of the nouvelle vague created work that rewrote the grammar of cinema, each film more innovative than the last. SIFFÂ has selected nine of their favorite films from this incredible period. The Godard's '60s Film Festival plays at SIFF Cinema August 15-21. Showtimes are Daily around 8:00pm / Saturday and Sunday around 2:00pm and 8:00pm. SIFF Cinema is located at 321 Mercer Street at 3rd Avenue, McCaw Hall, in the heart of Seattle Center's Theatre District. Visit www.siff.net for more information!

August 20: "The EU and the World," 2008 EU Summer Seminar for High School, Community College, and In-Service Educators, Husky Union Building (HUB) 200, University of Washington, Seattle campus. Join faculty from the Jackson School of International Studies to learn about the EU and its relationship with the rest of the world. The changing relationship of Russia with the rest of the world, along with the recent rise of the Asian economies has shifted the balance of power that made the EU and US global economic leaders since World War II. EU development aid to Africa is essential in the fight to end global poverty. The EU-US relationship also continues to evolve and is a crucial link in supporting the economy of the Pacific Northwest. At this workshop, speakers will discuss the current relationship between the EU and the rest of the world: EU, US, and Russia (Former Ambassador Darryl Johnson), China and the West (David Bachman), Africa and the EU (Speaker TBD), and Trans-Atlantic Relations (Phil Shekleton). Participants are also invited to a workshop dinner at a local European restaurant. Afternoon language break-out sessions will be offered in English, French, and Spanish. The French and Spanish sessions, offered by the Alliance Française of Seattle and the Center for Spanish Studies, respectively, will be offered in the target language and will provide pedagogical strategies, as well as topical information about workshop themes for the foreign language classroom.

October 2: "Francesco Mochi and the Edge of Tradition," Estelle Lingo, Assistant Professor, Art History, 4:00 pm, Art 003. The two-figure marble Annuciation group for Orvieto cathedral, carved by the young Tuscan sculptor Francesco Mochi (1580-1654) in the first decade of the seventeenth century, has long been considered to mark the beginning of "baroque" sculpture. In this talk, Estelle Lingo will probe the nautre of the work's novely, the controversy surrounding its installation in the cathedral, and its relation to Mochi's ambitious attempt to confront contemporary dilemmas of religious sculpture through an excavation of the Florentine sculptural tradition.

October 7: "Sustainability: Issues, Assessment and Ranking of Nations," Onassis Foundation Lecture Series, Yannis Phillis, Professor, Production Systems Engineering, Technical University of Crete, 3:30-4:30 pm, Mary Gates Hall 258, University of Washington, Seattle.

October 8: "Biodiversity: The Park for the Preservation of Flora and Fauna in Crete," Onassis Foundation Lecture Series, Yannis Phillis, Professor, Production Systems Engineering, Technical University of Crete, 3:30-4:30 pm, Mary Gates Hall 258, University of Washington, Seattle.

October 9: "Changing Climate: The Greek Experience," Onassis Foundation Lecture Series, Yannis Phillis, Professor, Production Systems Engineering, Technical University of Crete, 3:30-4:30 pm, Mary Gates Hall 258, University of Washington, Seattle.

October 29: "Trans-Atlantic Update," featuring Angelos Pangratis, Deputy Head of Delegation of the European Commission to the United States, 8:00 - 9:30 am, Trade Development Alliance of Greater Seattle.

October 30: "Hungary Now: Opportunities and Challenges," featuring His Excellency Ferenc Somogyi, Ambassador of Hungary to the United States, 8:00 am - 9:30 am, Trade Development Alliance of Greater Seattle. Registration $10 members, $12 non-members.

November 1: "Annual International Classroom Workshop at Whitworth College," 12:00 - 5:00 pm, Weyerhaeuser Hall, Room 111, Whitworth College. This workshop will feature speakers from the Jackson School at the University of Wasington and Gonzaga University for an afternoon of informative talks on US-Russian relations, teaching Europe, China and Tibet, and Muslim-Christian relations. Speakers will also review suggested background and curriculum materials for use in the classroom. The program, which includes 5 clock hours and a light snack, is $20. Co-sponsored by the Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, the Center for West European Studies, the East Asia Center, the Southeast Asia Center and the Center for Global Studies at the Jackson School of Internatonal Studies, University of Washington and the School of Education, Whitworth College. For more information or to register please contact the Ellison Center at (206) 543-4852 or email reecas@u.washington.edu.

November 6: "The Black Sea and the Mediterranean as a Crossroads of East and West," Master Teacher Workshop, 5:00-8:00 pm, Husky Union Building 200 AB, University of Washington, Seattle campus. This workshop will explore Western Civilization through the Black Sea and Mediterranean regions. Often thought of as different entities, one East and one West, the area throughout most of history was actually more connected than is thought today. Beginning in Antiquity and ending in the present, our speakers will discuss change and continuity between the Black Sea and Mediterranean regions, and their role as a crossroads between Eastern and Western Europe.

November 17: "Poiesis and Modernity in the Old and New Worlds," Early Modern Research Group talk by Leah Middlebrook, University of Oregon, 4:00 pm, Simpson Center, CMU 202, University of Washington, Seattle campus.

November 22: Diploma of Spanish as a Foreign Language Examination, Padelford C-224, University of Washington, Seattle. Registration runs from September 1 - October 10, 2008.

December 1: "How to Read Russian Children's Comics," Jose Alaniz, Department of Slavic Languages and Literature, 2:00 pm, Communications Building 202, University of Washington, Seattle campus. How have the socio-economic changes in Russia over the last 20 years affected the style and content of post-Soviet children’s comics? Through a reading of Andrei and Natalya Snegirov’s comics series Keshka (refracted through Mikhail Ryklin’s concept of “speech vision”) the talk will shed light on neoliberalism, consumerism, the representation of children and the much-maligned history of comics in Russia. For more information contact the Dept of Slavic Languages and Literature at slavicll@u.washington.edu or 206-543-6848.

December 1-3: Slovenian Literature on Film, 6:30 pm, Allen Auditorium, Suzzallo-Allen Library, University of Washington, Seattle campus. This festival of recent Slovenian feature films and short subjects, synchronized to take place on December 1-3, 2008 in scores of locations worldwide where Slovenian language is taught (including UW), is sponsored by the University of Ljubljana and the Film Foundation of the Republic of Slovenia. Free and open to the public. The films being shown are: Headnoise (2002, dir. Andrej Košak) on Dec. 1, Rooster's Breakfast (2007, dir. Marko Naberšnik) on Dec. 2, and The Journey (2008, dir. Andraž Pöschl), Child in Time (2004, dir. Maja Weiss), and Dizzy Bird (1997, dir. Sašo Podgoršek) on Dec. 3. For more information, contact: slavinfo@u.washington.edu or call 206-685-9865.

December 5: "Taxation and the Worlds of Welfare," Monica Prasad, Northwestern University, 1:30 pm, Condon Hall 311, University of Washington, Seattle campus. This talk is part of the Center for West European Studies Politics & Society Colloquium. For more information, contact CWES at 206-543-1675 or cwes@u.washington.edu.

December 11: "The Black Sea and the Mediterranean as a Crossroads of East and West," Master Teacher Workshop, 5:00-8:00 pm, Husky Union Building 310, University of Washington, Seattle campus. This workshop will explore Western Civilization through the Black Sea and Mediterranean regions. Often thought of as different entities, one East and one West, the area throughout most of history was actually more connected than is thought today. Beginning in Antiquity and ending in the present, our speakers will discuss change and continuity between the Black Sea and Mediterranean regions, and their role as a crossroads between Eastern and Western Europe.

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2007 Archive

January 11: "La litterature algerienne: de Kateb a Djebar" presentation and discussion by Nabil Boudraa, Professor of French and Francophone Studies at Oregon State University. 3:30-6:30 pm, Padelford B-202, University of Washington, Seattle.

January 27: "Immigration and Multiculturalism in Europe," CWES session at the International Studies Schools Association Conference. Pre-registration required.

February 2: "African American and Francophone Postcolonial Memory: Octavia Butler's Kindred and Assia Djebar's La Femme sans sepulture," Anne Donadey, University of Texas, Austin, 3:30 pm, Communications 202 (Simpson Center for the Humanities Seminar Room), University of Washington, Seattle. For more information, call 206-543-1675.

February 15: Talk on the US & Nordic States, Victoria Middleton, Director of Nordic and Baltic Affairs,US Department of State, 1:20-3:20 pm, Mary Gates Hall 238, University of Washington, Seattle. For more information, call 206-543-1675.

February 15: Talk on the US & Baltic States, Victoria Middleton, Director of Nordic and Baltic Affairs, US Department of State, 3:30-5:20 pm, Denny Hall 317, University of Washington, Seattle. For more information, call 206-543-1675.

February 23-24: "West Coast Model EU," University of Washington, Seattle. Pre-registration required. For more information, see the Model EU web site.

March 2: World Languages Day for Washington High School Students, University of Washington, Seattle. Preregistrationrequired.

March 8: "The Christian Churches as 'Free Spaces' in Communist East Central Europe: the Slovak and East German Cases," David Doellinger, Western Oregon University, 3:30 pm, Communications 126. Professor Doellinger specializes in the history of Christianity in East Central Europe during the Communist era. He has published articles on pacifism in Communist East Germany and on religious pilgrimages in Communist Czechoslovakia, and is currently working on a book on Christians in East Germany and Slovakia during the Communist period. Talk sponsored by the Department of History, REECAS, CWES Politics and Society Colloquium.

March 9-11: EU session at the WSCSS 2007 Annual Social Studies Leadership Retreat.

March 17: "Teachable Traditions: Folk Art, Toys and Tales," K-8 Mosaic Professional Development Workshop, 8:30 am - 4:30 pm, Thomson Hall, University of Washington, Seattle. Pre-registration required. For more information, call 206-221-7951.

March 18-31: Europe Week to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome.

March 29: "The European Union: Celebrating 50 Years of Peace, Prosperity, and Partnership," Mattias Sundholm, Deputy Head of Press & Public Diplomacy and Spokesperson for the European Commission Delegation to the United States, 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm, Husky Union Building (HUB) 309. Europe Week celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, which established the European Economic Community, the forerunner of the European Union. Fifty years after the signing of the Treaty of Rome, the EU is thriving, thanks in large part to the procedures that were set forth with the formation of the EEC. The creation of the institutions and the broad policy framework enshrines in the original Treaty have allowed for the dream of a unified Europe to be achieved. Mr. Sundholm is visiting the Northwest as part of activities marking Europe Week.

March 29: European Business Card Exchange, 5:30 pm -7:30 pm. Venue: Stellar Holdings, 520 Pike Street, Suite 2200, Seattle, WA 98101. $10 per person at the door, and one business card. Come to the First European Business Card Exchange of 2007 for hors d'oeuvres and to meet others in the business community with interests in Europe . Featuring Guest Speaker Mattias Sundholm, Deputy Head of Press & Public Diplomacy and Spokesperson for the European Commission Delegation to the United States.

March 31: "7th Annual Documentary Film Workshop: Teaching Diversity & Cross-Cultural Understanding Through Documentary Films for High School, Community College and In-service Educators," 8:30 am registration, 9:00 am - 1:00 pm program, University of Washington, Seattle. $25 registration fee includes 4 clock hours, continental breakfast, and curriculum materials. Pre-registration is required. For more information, call 206-221-6374 or email canada@u.washington.edu.

April 5: "Democratic Militancy and Democratic Rule: Limits to Political Pluralism in Europe," Giovanni Capoccia, Tutorial Fellow in Politics at Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford in residence at Harvard University 2006-2007, 12:30-2:30 pm, Thomson Hall 317, University of Washington, Seattle. For more information, call 206-221-7951.

April 18: "The End of Multiculturalism: Can Europe and Islam Co-Exist?" Hot Spots in our World Lecture by Steve Pfaff, UW Professor of Sociology, 7:00-8:30 pm, University of Washington, Seattle. Pre-registration required.

April 18: "Latvia in the European common Educational Space." Prof. Baiba Rivza, Minister for Education and Science, Republic of Latvia. Sponsored by the UW department of Scandinavian Studies and the UW Baltic Studies Program. 10:30-11:20 am, Smith Hall 304.

April 23: "Denmark in the World Community." Friis Arne Petersen, Denmark Ambassador to the United States. Sponsored by the Northwest Danish Foundation, Center for West European Studies, UW Department of Scandinavian Studies, the European Union Center of Excellence, and UW Office of Global Affairs. 1:00 pm, Henry Art Gallery Auditorium, University of Washington, Seattle. For more information, email euc@u.washington.edu or call 206-616-2415.

April 27: "European Constitutionalism: National, Transnational and International Perspectives." Academic conference. 9:00 am - 5:00 pm, Peterson Room, Allen Library, University of Washington, Seattle. Academic conference that will bring together leading legal scholars and political scientists from Europe and the United States to discuss past, present and future directions in European constitutionalism. For more information, call 206-543-1675 or email cwes@u.washington.edu.

April 27: "Transnational Advocacy Networks: Case Studies from Europe and the US." Academic conference. 9:00 am - 4:30 pm, Communications 126, University of Washington, Seattle. Academic conference. Sponsored by the Center for West European Studies, the Center for Communication and Civic Engagement, the University of Wisconsin Center for European Studies and the University of Washington Political Science Department. For more information, call 206-543-1675 or email cwes@u.washington.edu.

April 30: "The New Civic Engagement: Citizenship and Social Activism in Europe and the US." A workshop for secondary educators. 4:30-7:30 pm, Thomson Hall 317, UW Campus, Seattle. This workshop looks at how globalization and the digital age are changing the notions of citizenship and democratic civic engagement. Cost is $15 with parking, 3 clock hours, materials, and meals provided. For more information contact cwes@u.washington.edu or 206-543-1675.

May 9: Europe Day Business Breakfast Talk with the European Union Center of Excellence and the Council of European Chambers of Commerce, featuring Ambassador Darrell Johnson who will speak on "The European Union, Russia, and the United States," 7:30 am-9:30 am, World Trade Center, 2200 Alaskan Way, Holland American Dining Room 4th fl, Seattle. Cost is $25 for members of a European Chamber of Commerce (including the EU Center); $35 for non-members.

May 18-20: "Inventions of the Imagination: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Imaginary Since Romanticism." International conference bringing scholars from around the world. Conference participants will investigate not merely those ideas or objects the creative imagination is thought to have produced, but above all different ways in which the very faculty of the imagination has been "invented" and conceived at distinct historical junctures. Sponsored by the Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities.

May 24-June 17: Seattle International Film Festival. Screening of CWES-sponsored film, "Mon Meilleur Ami" (My Best Friend) May 27 and May 30.

June 27-29: Summer Seminar for Educators, "Teaching World Religions." Registration is closed.

July 11: European Union Summer Workshop, "Fifty Years of the EU: Its Successes and its Future." At this workshop, speakers will provide an overview of the first fifty years of the EU and look in-depth at the questions that will face the EU in this century: the constitutional treaty, the Euro, and future enlargement. A panel of European citizens will talk about the EU from country perspectives. Language break-out sessions will be offered in English, French, German and Spanish to discuss the themes in a disciplinary context and to provide pedagogical strategies for integrating EU topics into language instruction. (French, German and Spanish sessions will be provided pending enrollment numbers.) Presenters will include University of Washington faculty, staff, and keynote speaker Stephen Sieberson of Creighton University's School of Law and former honorary Dutch consul of Seattle, who will speak about the EU constitution and the future of federalism. All participants are invited to attend a European dinner following the workshop hosted by the European Union Center of Excellence. Pre-registration required. Contact the EUC at euc@u.washington.edu or 206-616-2415.

October 8: "Slovenia and the EU: Lessons from the Enlargement Process, the Prospects for the EU Presidency," HE Samuel Zbogar, Ambassador of Slovenia to the US, 11:30 am-12:20 pm, Thomson Hall 101, University of Washington, Seattle.

October 9: "The Discovery and Government of Hunger: The Social and Its States of Welfare in Modern Imperial Britain," James Vernon, Professor of History and Director of the Center for British Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, 3:30 pm, Simpson Center, Communications 202, University of Washington, Seattle. Reception to follow. Hunger is as old as history itself. Indeed, it appears to be a timeless and inescapable biological condition. And yet perceptions of hunger and of the hungry have changed over time and differed from place to place. Hunger has a history, which can now be told. This talk will draw from James Vernon's forthcoming book, Hunger: A Modern History (Harvard University Press).

October 12: "Paradoxes of Exile and Identity: Ionesco and Cioran in Postwar Paris," Matei Calinescu, Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature, English, and West European Studies at Indiana University, 5:30-6:30 pm, Simpson Center, Communication Building 206. Professor Calinescu will deliver the keynote speech for the Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference hosted by the Division of French and Italian Studies.

October 12-13: "Aesthetics & (Self) Deception," Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference Hosted by the Division of French and Italian Studies, Simpson Center, Communication Building 206, 8:30 am-5:30 pm.

October 26: "Kalaallit Nunaat - Greenland: A Nation in the Making. Decolonization and National-building in Denmark's Former Colony," Dr. Soren Thuesen, Associate Professor, Chair of Eskimologyand Arctic Studies, Department of Cross-Cultural & Regional Studies, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Dr. Thuesen will explore Greenland's history from the period of Danish colonial rule (early 18th century) to the formal conclusion of colonial relations in 1953, to the establishment of home rule in 1979 and the process of decolonizationwhich continues today. 1:00 pm, 314 Raitt Hall, University of Washington. Sponsored by the Department of Scandinavian Studies and the Danish Studies Program. For more information, contact Scandinavian Studies.

October 30: "How Others See Us: Perspectives from Europe and Asia." The Honorable Andreas van Agt, Former Prime Minister of the Netherlands & Ambassador of the European Community to Japan and the US. Sponsored by the University of Washington Business School, the European Center of Excellence, the East Asia Center and Japan Studies. 7:00 - 8:30 pm, Walker-Ames Room, Kane Hall 225, University of Washington. For more information, contact the UW Global Business Center at uwciber@u.washington.edu or 206-543-4109.

October 31: "A Multifaceted No to Europe: Why the Dutch and the French Rejected the European Constitution," Sylvain Brouard, Visiting Scholar at the Center for American Politics and Public Policy and a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre de Recherches Politiques de Sciences Po. 3:30-5:00 pm, Condon Hall 311, University of Washington. This talk is part of the Center for West European Studies Politics & Society Colloquium.

November 1: "Post-Communist Transformation in Central Europe," Leszek Balcerowicz, Head of the International Comparative Studies Department at the Warsaw School of Economics, former Polish Deputy Prime Minister, Finance Minister, and President of the Polish National Bank. In post-Communist Central Europe, Professor Balcerowicz's most important achievement was the introduction of "Balcerowicz Plan," a complex package of radical, free-market reforms, described as "shock therapy" for the Polish economy, which between 1990 and 2000 resulted in one of the highest annual economic growth rates of all the former Communist countries, leading ultimately to Poland's joining the European Union in 2005. Sponsored by the University of Washington Polish Studies Endowment Committee, The Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies and the Department of Economics. 7:30 pm, Kane Hall 120, University of Washington. For more information, contact Krystyna Untersteiner with the UW Polish Studies Endowment Committee at 206 526 2981 or kuntersteiner@polishstudiesuw.org, the UW Slavic Department at 206-543-6848 or slavicll@u.washington.edu.

November 2: "The Dynamics of French Agenda-Setting in Comparative Perspective." Workshop including a panel on Agenda Setting and French Politics, as well as a Round Table on Comparative Perspectives on Agenda Setting. Discussants will include Frank Baumgartner of Penn State University, Sebastian Lazardeux, a graduate student at the University of Washington, M. Foucault of Montreal University, Sylvain Brouard, a Visiting Scholar at the Center for American Politics and Public Policy and Bryan Jones, University of Washington. 1:00-5:00 pm, Gowen Hall 1A, University of Washington. A reception will follow in the Center for American Politics and Public Policy Center in Smith Hall 220. For more information, contact the Department of Political Science at 206-543-2780.

November 5: "From the Submissive to the Rebellious: French Women's Poetry of the Great War," Gary Mole, Associate Professor of French Studies at Bar-Ilan University, Israel, 1:30 pm, Communications Building 202, Simpson Center Conference Room, University of Washington, Seattle. This talk is part of the Center for West European Studies Culture Colloquium.

November 13: "Cyprus: The EU's Lighthouse in the Eastern Mediterranean," His Excellency Andreas Kakouris, Ambassador of Cyprus to the United States. 3:30-5:00, Peterson Room, Allen Library. His Excellency Andreas Kakouris became the Ambassador of Cyprus to the United States in 2006. Mr. Kakouris is the former Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Cyprus to Ireland. Prior to his appointment in Ireland he held the position of the Director of the Political Affiars Divison at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Cyprus, during which time he represented Cyprus to the European Union Associate Countries Political Directors Meetings and was the Senior Official for the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership.

November 14: "A Delicate Dance: Multicultural Issues in Modern Day France." This workshop for K-12 teachers consists of a pedagogical session on teaching about multiculturalism, lead by Katharyne Mitchell, UW Professor of Geography, and a panel discussion on the integration of Muslims and Arabs into French society and how multicultural artistic expression through forms such as hip hop figures in this ongoing transition. Offered in conjunction with the performances of Compagnie La BARAKA at the UW World Series.

November 17: "Learning Language with Global Peers," led by Jennifer Geist, will show teachers what they need to know to get started with an online collaborative project in the language they teach and communicate with global peers using iEARN (International Education and Resource Network). Update: Registration is now full, but we are still taking registrants for the Waitlist. We will try to accommodate as many educators as possible.

November 19: "Islam, Sex and the City: Quality of Life Issues in Multi-Cultural Berlin," Politics & Society Colloquium lecture by Joyce Mushaben, 11:30-12:20, Thomson Hall 101. Mushaben is Professor and Research Fellow at the Center for International Studies and Director of the Institute for Women's and Gender Studies at the University of Missouri, St. Louis.

November 30: Deadline for school registration of Euro Challenge. Euro Challenge is an opportunity for high school students to learn about the European Union and the euro. Student teams are asked to make presentations answering specific questions about the European economy and the euro, as well as pick one member country of the euro area, examine an economic problem at the country level and identify policies for responding to that problem. Up to 75 teams will compete nationally for cash awards and a trip to New York City and Washington, DC. Teams recruited by the EUÂ Center of Excellence of Seattle will be judged by the EU Center of Excellence of Seattle in the first round of the competition. The top team from each participating EU Center region will be sent to New York City to compete in semifinal and possibly final rounds. For more information, contact the EU Center of Excellence.

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2006 Archive

March 30: Andrew Pike (Northern Irish Consul to the United States) "Northern Ireland: Clinching the Peace" 7:00pm, 110 Kane Hall. Contact CWES for more info.

April 2: "Lodz Ghetto Album" with Dr. Thomas Weber 1:00 pm, Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Street. Co-sponsored by Washington State Holocaust Education Resource Center. An extraordinary series of powerful and brilliant images taken by ghetto photographer, Henryk Ross. Inquires, call (206) 622-9250.

April 3: Dr. Thomas Weber (University of Pennsylvania), "Oxford and Heidelberg Universities before the First World War: British and German Elite Institutions in Comparative Perspective" 3:30 pm, Thomson 317, University of Washington. Contact CWES.

April 12: Dr. John Keeler (University of Washington) "The Fight Against Terrorism in Europe" 7:00-8:30 pm, Kane Hall Room 225 (Walker-Ames Room), University of Washington. Co-sponsored by UW Extension. Pre-registration required. Call 206-897-8939 for more information, or visit http://extension.washington.edu/ext/special/jackson.

April 19: Barry Jackisch (Gannon College) "Conservative Kulturpolitik in the Wake of War and Revolution: The DNVP and Cultural Politics, 1918-1924" 4:00-5:30 pm, University Center Regency Room, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma. Co-sponsored by the Department of History, PLU.

April 20: Barry Jackisch (Gannon University) "Conservative Kulturpolitik in the Wake of War and Revolution: The DNVP and Cultural Politics, 1918-1924" 3:30 pm, Rey Library Denny 308. Contact CWES.

April 20: Teacher Workshop on "Terrorism and Trans-Atlantic Relations," 4:30-7:30 pm, Johnson Hall 022, University of Washington. Pre-registration required Call 206-543-1675 For a registration flyer click here.

April 21: Academic Conference: "Terrorism and Trans-Atlantic Relations," 9:00am -5:00pm. Kane Hall Room 225 (Walker-Ames Room), University of Washington. For more information, visit the conference web site http://jsis.washington.edu/euc/terrorism/.

April 25: Sven Steinmo (Univ of Colorado), "The Evolution of the Modern State," 3:30 pm, Savery Hall Room 110C. This talk will focus on the ways Sweden has responded and adapted to the the pressures of globalization, demographic change, and the decline of public trust. Contact CWES for more information.

April 26: Teacher Workshop "Who's Got it Better, Women in Europe or Women in the U.S.?" 4:30-7:30 pm, HUB 209B, University of Washington. Preregistration required. See page 8 for registration information or call 206-543-1292. For a registration flyer click here.

April 27-28: Academic Conference: "Gender, Equality, and the State in the European Union," 9:00am-5:00pm, HUB 200 A/B, University of Washington. For more information, visit the conference website http://jsis.washington.edu/euc/gender/.

May 2: David Feldman (Birkbeck College, London) "Jews and the British Empire, C. 1900" 3:30-5:00pm, Communications 226, University of Washington. For more information, contact the UW History Department.

May 9: Europe Day Business Card Exchange featuring speaker from European Commission Delegation to the United States, 5:30-7:30pm, Offices of Graham & Dunn PC, Pier 70, 2801 Alaskan Way, Suite 300. $5.00 in advance; $10.00 at the door. Contact French American Chamber of Commerce for additional information and registration, 206-443-4703 or Laurew@faccpnw.org.

May 18: Gokce Yurdakul (University of Toronto), "Mobilizing Kreuzberg: Political Representation, Immigrant Incorporation and Turkish Associations in Berlinş" 3:30 pm, Place TBD, University of Washington. Contact CWES.

May 20: 6th Annual Documentary Film Workshop: Teaching Diversity & Cross-Cultural Understanding through Documentary Films fro high school, community college and in-service educatiors. 8:30AM-12:30PM HUB 310. Pre-registration is necessary, cost is $25. For more information contact Canadian Studies at 206-221-6374 or canada@u.washington.edu For flyer click here.

May 24-26: Academic Conference on "Politics of Ethics," 9:00 am - 5:00 pm. Thomson Hall Room 317, University of Washington. Contact CWES for more information. To see the conference page click here.

June 26: Ambassador John Bruton - EU Ambassador to the U.S. "Global Partners, Global Challenges: the United States and the European Union in the new century." 7:00pm at the North Creek Cafe, Cascadia Community College-University of Washington, Bothell. Event is free and open to the public. For an event flyer click here. For more information contact dgonzales@cascadia.ctc.edu.

June 27-28: "Open a Book, Open Your World: Exploring International Literature" A Workshope for Social Studies, Humanities and Other Educators. Kane Hall 110 University of Washington Seattle Campus. Registration Deadline: June 21 Cost: $80 For more information call 206-543-6938 or contact barnesk@u.washington.edu For a Registration Flyer Click Here.

June 27: Ambassador John Bruton - EU Ambassador to the U.S. "Collaboration & Conflict: the U.S.- EU Partnership" 8:00AM at the World Trade Center in Seattle. This breakfast presentation is open to all at a cost of $28 for World Affairs Council Members and $35 for non-members. For an event flyer click here. For more information from the World Affairs Council click here.

July 10: "The EU and the Challenges of Globalization," Summer Workshop for High School, Community College, and in-service educators, Husky Union Building 209B, University of Washington Seattle Campus. Presenters will include UW faculty, staff, keynote speaker Jean-Yves Haine of the London International Institute of Strategic Studies; language sessions will be hosted by the Alliance Francaise of Seattle and the Center for Spanish Studies. More information and registration form available online. For more information call 206-543-1675 or email euc@u.washington.edu. Registration information available online by clicking here.

August 29: "EU Workshop for Washington State Legislators." Sponsored by the Global Business Center and the European Union Center of Excellence, this workshop features business and government leaders who will discuss the international economic interest of the region as well as the importance of the economic relationship between the European Union and Washington State.

September 29: "The European Union Today," presentation by Mr. Frans van Daele, Belgian Ambassador to the United States. 1:00-2:00 pm, Peterson Room, Allen Library, University of Washington, Seattle.

October 12: "US-EU Cooperation: Working Together to Promote Reform and Democracy in Ukraine and Belarus," brown bag talk by David Kramer, US Department of State Deputy Assistant Secretary for European and Eurasian Affairs. 1:00 pm, Thomson Hall 317. Open to the public. Mr. Kramer will also discuss career opportunities with US Department of State.

October 20: "The Group as a Work of Art: Laocoon and its Afterlives," Culture Colloquium talk by Dolora Chapelle Wojciehowski, University of Texas, Austin. 2:00-3:30 pm, Parrington Commons. Open to the public.

October 23: "The Hungarian Revolution: 50 Years Later" commemorative event. 7:00-9:00 pm, Walker-Ames Room of Kane Hall on the UW Seattle campus. Keynote speaker Dr. Peter Dobay, Professor at the University of Pecs, one of Europe's oldest universities located in a sister city of Seattle, will provide a historical background of Hungary to 1956. A panel of eyewitness accounts by people who experienced the revolutions of 1956 and 1989 will include author of The Fall of the Red Star, Helen M. Szablya and former foreign service officer, David Hughes. The evening will conclude with comments on Hungary today and its accession to the European Union. The event is free and open to the public.

October 24: "Revolts and Revolutions: Central and Eastern Europe in the 20th Century" Master Teacher Workshop for high school, community college, and in-service educators. 4:30-7:30 pm, Husky Union Building (HUB) 200 A/B. Coinciding with the anniversary of the Hungary Revolution of 1956, this workshop will draw on historical context, personal experiences and current observations to examine the conditions that led up to this and other similar events in Poland in 1956 and the Velvet Revolutions of 1989. First of two workshops. More information and registration form available online. For more information, call 206-543-1675 or email cwes@u.washington.edu.

October 27: "Security, Social Control, Democracy and Mictration with the 'Constitution' of the European Union," Professor Dario Melossi, University of Bologna. 12:30-2:00 pm, Miller Hall Room 112. Moving from Michel Foucault's criticism, in the mid-1970s, of a 'theory of the State', this paper addresses the relevance--for the current process of making the 'Constitution' of the European Union--of the obsolescence of the state concept and the emergence instead, in the course of the twentieth-century, of an idea of 'social control' as a way to represent conditions for social order within the new mass democratic society. Sponsored by the Law Justice and Societies Program, The Jackson School , Center for West European Studies, the European Union Center , the Department of Geography, and the Department of Political Science.

December 5: "Revolts and Revolutions: Central and Eastern Europe in the 20th Century" Master Teacher Workshop for high school, community college, and in-service educators. 4:30-7:30 pm, Husky Union Building (HUB) 200 A/B. Coinciding with the anniversary of the Hungary Revolution of 1956, this workshop will draw on historical context, personal experiences and current observations to examine the conditions that led up to this and other similar events in Poland in 1956 and the Velvet Revolutions of 1989. Second of two workshops. More information and registration form available online. For more information, call 206-543-1675 or email cwes@u.washington.edu.

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Center for West European Studies
120 Thomson Hall
Box 353650
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
(206) 543-1675 office
(206) 616-2462 fax
cwes@uw.edu