China Studies Course Offerings


Below, listed in alphabetical order by department/program name, are the course offerings available to China Studies undergraduate and graduate students. Please note that only a small percentage of the courses listed below are offered during a given quarter.

To see which courses are offered for next quarter, see the East Asia course booklet for Autumn Quarter 2012.

To see when a course was last taught (and thereby get a sense of how frequently that course is offered) please see the University of Washington's time schedule archive.

 


 

To navigate to a certain department’s offerings, click on the name of the department below.

Anthropology
Architecture/ Urban Planning and Design
Art History
Asian Languages and Literature
Communication
Comparative Literature
Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
Geography
History
International Business
International Studies: Core Courses (JSIS)
International Studies: Area Studies (JSIS A)
International Studies: Global and Topical Courses (JSIS B)
International Studies: Infrequently Taught Courses (JSIS D)
Law
Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
Political Science
Sociology

  


 

Anthropology

 

ANTH 370/ JSIS A 370 Han Chinese Society and Culture, 5 cr.
Themes in the society and culture of the Han Chinese people. Concepts of self; personal interaction; family; gender; and marriage; communities and the state; religion and ritual; class; social categories; and social mobility; centralism; nationalism; and patriotism.

ANTH 406/ JSIS A 406 China’s Environment, 5 cr.
This course begins with historical cultures of China and their relationship to their environments, and considers whether China in the 19th century was already undergoing a long-term environmental crisis. It then proceeds to the enormous environmental and cultural changes wrought by 20th century modernization, revolution, and development. The course finishes with a survey of current environmental conditions and problems, and a critique of official and unofficial attempts to solve those problems.

ANTH 442/ JSIS A 442 GWSS 446 Global Asia, 5 cr.
For course description see GWSS 446

ANTH 444/ JSIS A 403 Representation and Power in Modern China, 5 cr.
Focuses on issues of representation and power in twentieth century China. Combines substantive information on modern Chinese society and culture with recent debates in social theory and the politics of representation. Major themes include Chinese nationalism, body politics, popular culture, and everyday practice.

ANTH 446/JSIS D 443 Class and Culture in East Asia, 5 cr.
Examines the nexus between culture and systems of social stratification/class in East Asia, with an emphasis on Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and China. Topics include class formation, mechanisms of social mobility and reproduction, markers of status and hierarchy, resistance, and the formation of class identity.

ANTH 447/ JSIS A 404 Religion in China, 5 cr.
Religion in Chinese society, doctrines, practices, and social consequences of the eclectic folk religion, the elite Confucian, Taoist, and Buddhist traditions, syncretistic sects, and imported Christianity. Prerequisite: either one 200-level ANTH course, ANTH 370, ANTH 403, LING 203, HSTAS 211, HSTAS 454, RELIG 202, SISEA 370, or SISEA 443.

ANTH 470/ JSIS A 470 Minority Peoples of China, 5 cr.
Interaction between China and the peoples of its periphery, including inner Asia, Tibet, northern mainland Southeast Asia, and aboriginal peoples of Taiwan. Emphasis on ethnicity, ethnic group consciousness, and role of the Chinese state. Prerequisite: one 200-level ANTH course; LING 203; either ANTH/JSIS A 370 or HSTAS 454.


 

Architecture

 

ARCH 451 Traditional Chinese Architecture and Gardens, 3 cr.
Introduction to Chinese architecture (palaces, homes, temples, tombs), urban planning, and gardens; each area examined in terms of techniques of production, visual styles, historical development, and relationship to traditional Chinese cultural values. Recommended: some background in Chinese art, history, language, or literature.


 

Art History

 

ART H 212 Chinese Art and Visual Culture, 5 cr.
Surveys the highlights of Chinese visual arts from the Neolithic to the present. Studies jade, bronze, lacquer, silk, Buddhist sculpture, ceramics, calligraphy, painting, architecture, film, and installation art forms at a moment in Chinese history when work in those media was especially innovative and important.

ART H 310 Chinese Art and Archeology: Neolithic to Han Dynasty, 5 cr.
Introduces Chinese art and archaeology from the Neolithic to the Han Dynasty. Focuses on the history of developing technology and the archaeological basis for understanding the development of art and visual culture in early China.

ART H 311 Arts of Imperial China, 5 cr.
Introduces the role of painting in the history of Imperial China from the fourth to the seventeenth century. Topics for reading and discussion include political forces, regional geography, social structure, gender, traditional philosophies, religious, and spiritual influences.

ART H 315 Buddhist Art and Material Culture of East Asia, 5 cr.
Buddhist painting and sculpture of China, Korea, and Japan. Explores religious meaning, artistic development, and historical significance. Examples from the sixth to the seventeenth centuries, along with paintings and contemporary carvings.

ART H 411 Chinese Painting Experiences, 900-1800, 3 cr.
Examines issues of style, theme, and function in Chinese pointing from the tenth to the nineteen century. Discusses painting practice, patronage, regional diversity, the relationship of word and image, amateurism vs. professionalism, and the introduction of foreign elements.

ART H 412 Art History and the Study of Chinese Bronzes, 3 cr.
An investigation of Chinese Bronzes to illuminate some general ideas about the discipline and practice of art history. Focuses on a case study examining the work of a twentieth century practitioner of art history and comparing it with that of a famous scholar from a neighboring discipline.

ART H 413 Selected Topics in Chinese Art, 3-9 cr.
Specific theme or area of Chinese art, such as the art of the bronze age or Chinese painting under Communist rule. Recommended: some background in Chinese art, history, language, or literature.

ART H 511 Seminar in Chinese Art, 5-15 cr.
This seminar will use Chinese bronzes to illuminate the practice of art history. To explore concretely some key issues and methods, we will focus on a single case study, looking at the work of one of the best 20th century practitioners of art history and comparing it with that of a famous scholar from a neighboring discipline. Our case study is the prolonged controversy between Max Loehr (1903-1988) and Bernhard Karlgren (1889-1978) over the history of Chinese bronzes.

 


 

Asian Languages and Literature

 

ASIAN 204 Literature and Culture of China from Tradition to Modernity, 5 cr.
Asian 204 is designed to introduce students to representative works of twentieth-century Chinese fiction and film. Students will also gain background knowledge in modern Chinese history, and develop skills in analyzing and enjoying literary and cinematic texts.

ASIAN 263 Great Works of Asian Literature, 5 cr.
Selected major works of Asian literature. Taught on a rotational basis with the literary traditions of China, Japan, India covered in successive years. Content varies depending on specialization and interest of instructor. Primary emphasis on literary values of works and their tradition; attention also given to historical and social contexts and the thought and value systems of the culture involved.

ASIAN 404 Writing Systems, 5 cr.
Origin, nature, and development of writing systems. Alphabets, syllabaries, and logographic systems; relation of writing systems to spoken languages; decipherment of previously undeciphered scripts.

CHIN 101-103 First-Year Chinese for Non-Heritage Learners, 5 cr.
Introduction to the standard language. Emphasis on learning correct pronunciation and basic structure. Drill in oral use of the language. Open only to students who do not have any previous training in Chinese. Cannot be taken for credit in combination with CHIN 134.

CHIN 111-113 First-Year Chinese for Heritage Learners, 5 cr.
Intended for students who have some formal or home training in listening and speaking Mandarin. Focuses on reading comprehension and writing characters in context.

CHIN 134 First-Year Intensive Chinese for Non-Heritage Learners, 5 cr.
Introduction to the standard language. Emphasis on learning correct pronunciation and basic structure. Drill in oral use of the language. Open only to students who do not have any previous training in Chinese. Cannot be taken for credit in combination with CHIN 101, 102, or 103. Offered: S.

CHIN 201 Second-Year Chinese for Non-Heritage Learners, 5 cr.
Advanced grammar and vocabulary expansion stressed. Aural and oral practice and structural drills continued. Cannot be taken for credit in combination with CHIN 234. First in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.0 in either CHIN 103 or CHIN 134. Offered: A.

CHIN 202 Second-Year Chinese for Non-Heritage Learners, 5 cr.
Advanced grammar and vocabulary expansion stressed. Oral practice and structural drills continued. Cannot be taken for credit in combination with CHIN 234. Second in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.0 in CHIN 201. Offered: W.

CHIN 203 Second-Year Chinese for Non-Heritage Learners, 5 cr.
Advanced grammar and vocabulary expansion stressed. Oral practice and structural drills continued. Cannot be taken for credit in combination with CHIN 234. Third in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.0 in CHIN 202. Offered: Sp.

CHIN 234 Second-Year Intensive Chinese for Non-Heritage Learners, 5 cr.
Continuation of first-year non-heritage Chinese. Stresses advanced grammar and vocabulary expansion. Continues aural and oral practice and structural drills. Cannot be taken for credit in combination with 201, 2202, or 203 taken. Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.0 in either CHIN 103 or CHIN 134. Offered: S.

CHIN 301 Third-Year Chinese for Non-Heritage Learners, 5 cr.
Focuses on oral and aural proficiency. Covers general topics, reading ability of simple unedited text, as well as writing skill in short essay form. First in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: 2.0 in CHIN 203. Offered: A.

CHIN 302 Third-Year Chinese for Non-Heritage Learners, 5 cr.
Focuses on oral and aural proficiency. Covers general topics, reading ability of simple unedited text, as well as writing skill in short essay form. Second in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: 2.0 in CHIN 301. Offered: W.

CHIN 303 Third-Year Chinese for Non-Heritage Learners, 5 cr.
Focuses on oral and aural proficiency. Covers general topics, reading ability of simple unedited text, as well as writing skill in short essay form. Third in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: 2.0 in CHIN 302. Offered: Sp.

CHIN 342 The Chinese Language, 5 cr.
Nature and structure of the Chinese language, covering structural characteristics, genetic and typological affiliation, standard Mandarin and Chinese dialects, Chinese writing system, history of the Chinese language, and cultural aspects. Prerequisite: either CHIN 103, CHIN 113 or CHIN 134; recommended: either CHIN 201, CHIN 211 or CHIN 234.

CHIN 373 Chinese Poetry, 5 cr.
Introduction to Chinese poetry. A study of its origins, forms, major themes, and relevant conventions. All readings in English. No knowledge of Chinese required.

CHIN 374 Chinese Prose, 5 cr.
Survey of great works of Chinese prose, including philosophical writings, historical works, short narratives, essays, and rhyme-prose. All readings in English. No knowledge of Chinese required.

CHIN 380 Premodern Chinese Narrative in Translation, 5 cr.
Premodern Chinese fiction in English translation. Historical and cultural context of narrative traditions. Emphasis on Ming and Ch’ing periods; works and topics vary from year to year.

CHIN 381 Literature in Modern China, 5 cr.
Modern Chinese Drama and the Historical Imagination will explore theatrical texts (in translation) from the nineteen-twenties to the late nineteen-nineties. We will focus on the development of modern dramatic forms in China and will ask how theater has been mobilized to present specific visions of history and nationhood. In addition to reading the texts, we will explore various ways of interpreting them on stage -- from videos of existing performances to our own in-class dramatizations.

CHIN 411-413 Fourth-Year Chinese, 5 cr.
Reading of unedited texts including newspaper articles, literary selections, and academic essays. Oral discussion, listening comprehension, and composition.

CHIN 421 Business Chinese I, 5 cr.
Focus on international trade issues of Greater China in the contemporary world. Subjects include international business activities such as trade, banking, marketing, finance, and investment. First in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: CHIN 313. Offered: A.

CHIN 422 Business Chinese II, 5 cr.
Focus on international trade issues of Greater China in the contemporary world. Subjects include international business activities such as trade, banking, marketing, finance, and investment. Second in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: CHIN 421. Offered: W.

CHIN 423 Business Chinese III, 5 cr.
Focus on international trade issues of Greater China in the contemporary world. Subjects include international business activities such as trade, banking, marketing, finance, and investment. Third in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: CHIN 422. Offered: Sp.

CHIN 443 Structure of Chinese, 5 cr.
Outline of the major grammatical structures of Chinese. Focus on learning and teaching problems. Prerequisite: either CHIN 313 or CHIN 334.

CHIN 451-453 First-Year Classical Chinese, 5 cr.
Exercises and selected readings in pre-Han texts. Focus on grammar, systematic sentence analysis, and distinctive functions of grammatical particles.

CHIN 461 History of Chinese Literature, 5 cr.
Chinese literature from earliest times to the end of the Six Dynasties. Offered: A.

CHIN 462 History of Chinese Literature, 5 cr.
Exercises and selected readings in pre-Han texts. Focus on grammar, systematic sentence analysis, and distinctive functions of grammatical particles. Second in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: CHIN 451. Offered: W.

CHIN 463 History of Chinese Literature, 5 cr.
Exercises and selected readings in pre-Han texts. Focus on grammar, systematic sentence analysis, and distinctive functions of grammatical particles. Third in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: CHIN 452. Offered: Sp.

CHIN 482 Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese, 5 cr.
Modern texts in the original, mainly works published since the beginning of the twentieth century. Focus on literature, primarily short story and essay.

CHIN 499 Undergraduate Research, 5 cr.
For Chinese language and literature majors.

CHIN 531 Studies in Chinese Philology, 5 cr.
Sources and methods in the study of Chinese phonology; modern standard Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 442 or permission of instructor. Offered: A.

CHIN 532 Studies in Chinese Philology, 5 cr.
Sources and methods in the study of Chinese phonology; medieval period. Prerequisite: CHIN 442 or permission of instructor. Offered: W.

CHIN 533 Studies in Chinese Philology, 5 cr.
Sources and methods in the study of Chinese phonology; advanced topics in Chinese historical phonology. Prerequisite: CHIN 442 or permission of instructor. Offered: Sp.

CHIN 540 Seminar on Chinese Linguistics, 5 cr.
Advanced topics in Chinese linguistics. Subject emphasis varies from year to year. Offered: Sp.

CHIN 541 Seminar in Chinese Grammar, 5 cr.
Problems of theory and analysis of Chinese grammar, both synchronic and diachronic, modern and classical. Prerequisite: CHIN 443.

CHIN 542 Chinese Historical Phonology, 5 cr.
Introduction to Chinese historical phonology; emphasis on the Middle Chinese period. Prerequisite: CHIN 422 or permission of instructor.

CHIN 544 Chinese Dialectology, 5 cr.
Methodology and theory of studying Chinese dialects. Among areas covered are fieldwork methods, dialect classification, and dialectal grammar. Prerequisite: CHIN 542, ASIAN 401, and permission of instructor.

CHIN 551 Second-Year Classical Chinese, 5 cr.
Problems of grammar, rhetoric, and textual criticism. Early literary texts. Offered: A.

CHIN 552 Second-Year Classical Chinese, 5 cr.
Problems of grammar, rhetoric, and textual criticism. Later literary texts. Offered: W.

CHIN 553 Second-Year Classical Chinese, 5 cr.
Continuation of 551, 552. Intermediate level readings in Han and pre-Han historical and philosophical texts. Prerequisite: CHIN 551 and CHIN 552. Offered: Sp.

CHIN 554 Readings in Chinese Prose, 5 cr.
Selected readings in the fu of the Han, Wei, Chin, and North-South Dynasties period. Offered: alternate years.

CHIN 555 Readings in Chinese Prose, 5 cr.
Selected readings in parallel prose (pianti wen). Offered: alternate years.

CHIN 556 Readings in Chinese Prose, 5 cr.
Selected readings in guwen prose of the T' ang and Sung periods. Offered: alternate years.

CHIN 557 Introduction to Chinese Philology and Textual Criticism, 5 cr.
Principles and methods of textual criticism and philological analysis of ancient Chinese texts. Study of both manuscripts and transmitted texts. Emphasis on Han and pre-Han documents; specific texts vary. Prerequisite: two years of classical Chinese and ASIAN 401. Offered: alternate years.

CHIN 558 Seminar in Chinese Lexicology and Grammatonymy
Study of the Chinese script, lexicographical history, and lexicological and etymological analysis. Prerequisite: two years of classical Chinese, ASIAN 401. Offered: alternate years.

CHIN 559 Methods and Materials, 5 cr.
Introduction to the basic reference works and methods of research in Chinese language and literature. Includes a history of Sinology, survey of basic bibliographies, dictionaries, atlases, catalogs, journals, literary collections, concordances, and other sources. Prerequisite: CHIN 551, CHIN 552. Offered: alternate years.

CHIN 560 Proseminar in Chinese, 3-5 cr.
Methods and materials in the study of Chinese texts. Problems in textual analysis and Chinese literary history. Prerequisite: CHIN 553 and one of CHIN 554, CHIN 555, and CHIN 556.

CHIN 561 Studies in Chinese Literature, 5 cr.
Literature before Ch' in. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CHIN 562 Studies in Chinese Literature, 5 cr.
Poetry of the T' ang and Sung periods. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CHIN 563 Studies in Chinese Literature, 5 cr.
Literary theory and criticism. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CHIN 573 Seminar in Chinese Poetry, 5 cr.
Directed study of selected works of poetry. Subject emphasis varies each year. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Offered: alternate years.

CHIN 574 Seminar in Six Dynasties Literature, 5 cr.
Directed study of selected works of Six Dynasties. Subject emphasis varies each year. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Offered: alternate years.

CHIN 575 Studies in Chinese Drama, 5 cr.
Readings and discussion of Chinese drama. Subject emphasis varies. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Offered: alternate years.

CHIN 557 Advanced Readings in Chinese Opera, 4 cr.
Introduction to the dialogue and verses frequently used in Chinese opera. Comparisons between language spoken daily and languages used in Chinese opera. Prerequisite: CHIN 553 or permission of instructor. Offered: A.

CHIN 578 Advanced Readings in Classical Chinese, 5 cr.
Study of texts from all periods. Prerequisite: CHIN 553 or permission of instructor.

CHIN 580 Readings in Vernacular Chinese Fiction, 5 cr.
This introduction to the Chinese vernacular tale (huaben) will combine close reading of texts from various collections with a survey of the relevant scholarship in Western and Asian languages. Topics will include the history and evolution of the genre, the relationship between oral and written literature, Ming book culture, the narrative rhetoric of vernacular fiction, and the representation of gender. Students will be expected to prepare readings in Chinese and English, give in-class presentations, and submit a final research paper. Recommended prerequisites are four years’ college study of modern Chinese (or the equivalent), one year of classical Chinese, and previous coursework in literary studies. Contact the instructor for add codes.

CHIN 583 Seminar in Modern Chinese Literature, 5 cr.
Directed study of selected works of modern Chinese literature. Primary focus on the novel, short story, and essay.

CHIN 590 Readings in the Thirteen Classics, 5 cr.
Selected readings from the Thirteen Classics, and from their associated exegetic and hermeneutic traditions. Readings and emphases vary from year to year. Prerequisite: two years of Classical Chinese and CHIN 557. Offered: alternate years.

CHIN 591 Studies in the History of Chinese Thought, 5 cr.
Directed readings in selected traditional philosophical texts. Han through T' ang. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CHIN 592 Studies in the History of Chinese Thought, 5 cr.
Directed readings in selected traditional philosophical texts. Sung and Yuan. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CHIN 593 Studies in the History of Chinese Thought, 5 cr.
Directed readings in selected traditional philosophical texts. Ming and Ch' ing. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 


 

Communication

 

COM 420/JSIS B 419/ Pol 468 Comparative Media Systems: China, Hong Kong, Canada, 5 cr.
For course description see SIS 419


 

Comparative Literature

 

C LIT 322 Studies in Asian and Western Literatures, 5-15 cr.
How do urban literature and film inform our understanding of modern material conditions and ideolologies? How do narrative structures and cinematic images celebrate the metropolis and convey the anxieties associated with it? The course examines these questions through novels and films, mostly from the PRC, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

C LIT 397 Special Topics in Cinema Studies, 3-10 cr.
Varying topics relating to film in social contexts. Offered by resident or visiting faculty.

C LIT 576 Seminar in East-West Literary Relations, 3-15 cr.
Comparative investigation of literary topics requiring the study of both Eastern and Western documents. Explores parallels and contradictions between the two, in concepts, ideas, and specific topics. A comparative paper on a chosen topic with qualified conclusions is required. Emphasis varies. Prerequisite: at least one East Asian language.

 


 

Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies

 

GWSS 446/ ANTH 442/ JSIS A 452 Global Asia, 5 cr.
Explores how Asia has been constructed through transnational interactions such as imperialism, anti-colonialism, tourism, diaspora, and global capitalism. Topics include the cultural construction of similarity and difference, politics of representation, and political economy of global circulations of people and things. Prerequisite: one 200-level ANTH course. Offered: jointly with ANTH 442/JSIS A 452; W.

GWSS 459 Gender Histories of Modern China, 18th to 20th Centuries, 5 cr.
Emergence of modernist social, political, intellectual gender formations in social activism, revolutionary writing, scientific ideologies, economic globalization. Stresses gender difference in colonial modernity, revolutionary movement, communism, post-socialist market society. Relates modern Chinese women to global flows, new division of labor, local and regional experience. Offered: jointly with HSTAS 459

 


Geography

 

GEOG 435 Industrialization and Urbanization in China, 5 cr.
This course examines the “China model” of industrialization and urbanization in the post-1949 era. Focus is on the relationship between industrialization and urbanization and the social and economic impacts. To forge rapid industrialization, China created a dual structure and a two-tier system of citizenship, through mechanisms such as the household registration system. This approach helps to generate a massive army of low-cost migrant labor for carrying the strategy of being the “world’s factory” in the last two decades. This course approaches these issues through examining China’s industrialization strategies in the two different eras, the rural/urban socioeconomic structures, rural industrialization, the hukou system, migrant labor, urbanization policies, and urban development. The Chinese experience is studied in the broader context of development and globalization, and the sustainability of the China model is examined. Recommended: Geog/JSIS A 236, Geog 336, or a background course on contemporary China. Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of China.

GEOG 438 Cities of East Asia: Geography and Development, 5 cr.
Examines urban development in East Asia from a geographic and comparative perspective focusing on issues in development, and the interaction of geography, history, politics, and economics. Major topics include economic development and urbanization; regions and urban systems; migration; urban social and spatial structures; globalization and governance.

GEOG 505 Spatial Dimensions of Chinese Development, 5-10 cr.
This seminar course introduces graduate students to several major spatial topics, many of which are critical to present-day China’s development. These topics include population and land relationship, the spatial structures of economic activities and governments, rural-urban relations and transition, central-local relations, the hukou system, population mobility at different spatial scales, and urban centers. Emphasis will be on helping students develop theoretical, plus research and data skills. The scholarly literature for this course draws from the disciplines of geography, and other social science disciplines. Each student is expected to complete weekly readings, participate in presentations and discussions, and prepare a research paper (or a detailed research proposal) in relation to his or her interest areas at the end of the course.

 


 

History

 

HSTAS 211 History of Chinese Civilization, 5 cr.
A survey of Chinese civilization from the earliest times to the present, designed to provide a broad understanding of the development of Chinese civilization, and a sense of how the Chinese understand their own past. Themes to be covered will include: the origins and development of China's humanistic philosophical tradition; the structure and mechanisms of imperial rule; China's medieval and early modern social transformations; the arrival of the modern age in China; and contemporary problems and aspects. Arrangements can be made for W credit.

HSTAS 348/ JSIS A 346 Alternative Routes to Modernity, 5 cr.
Routes to modernity followed by non-Western societies between 1600 and 1900. Historical experiences of non-Western societies seen in the contexts of European history and of development theory. Primary sources and techniques for posing theoretical questions of historical data. Offered: jointly with JSIS A 346. Some knowledge of Russian or Chinese history desirable.

HSTAS 451 Chinese History: Earliest Times to 221 B.C., 5 cr.
Pre-imperial China

HSTAS 452 Chinese History from the Earliest Times to 1276, 5 cr.
This class covers Chinese history from the beginning through the Song period, with particular emphasis on the Tang and Song periods (618-1276). Intellectual, social, cultural, and political history will all be treated, though not equally for all periods. A "W" course.

HSTAS 453 Chinese History: 1276-1895, 5 cr.
This class covers Chinese history from the beginning through the Song period, with particular emphasis on the Tang and Song periods (618-1276). Intellectual, social, cultural, and political history will all be treated, though not equally for all periods. A "W" course.

HIST 454/ JSIS A 454 History of Modern China, 5 cr.
Social, cultural, political, economic, and intellectual transformations and continuities in China from the end of the imperial period to the present.

HIST 456/ JSIS A 456 Chinese Social History, 5 cr.
Surveys the major issues and approaches to the study of the role of the Chinese people in China’s historical development. Historical focus of course varies with instructor.

HSTAS 457 Women in China to 1800, 5 cr.
This course examines Chinese gender ideology and family systems and the ways they provided the context in which women fashioned their lives. To consider the extent of change over time, it will look at three periods from the tenth to eighteenth centuries. Fiction as a source for women's lives will be explored. A "W" course.

HSTAS 460/ JSIS A 460 Cities in China: Past and Present, 5 cr.
Economic, political, social, and cultural functions of the city in modern Chinese history. Changes in China' s urban system. The city as cultural center and focus of literary and cinematic representation. Attention to architecture, commerce, urbanization, the role of capital cities in the power of the state. Offered: jointly with JSIS A 460.

HSTAS 551 Field Course in Chinese History: Pre-Song Period, 3-6 cr.
Introduction to the English-language literature on Chinese history through the Song dynasty. Recommended: HSTAS 452 or equivalent

HSTAS 552-554 Seminar in Chinese History: Earliest Times to 1276, 3-6 cr.
Methods and materials for research in early imperial Chinese history. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of classical Chinese. Recommended: HSTAS 452, HSTAS 550, or HSTAS 551, or equivalent.

HSTAS 555-556 Core Research Seminar in Chinese History, 5 cr.
The preparation of a substantial research project, presented to the class in several stages.

HSTAS 560-564 Field Course in Chinese History: 1276-1895, 3-6 cr.
Introduction to the English-language literature on the Yuan, Min, and Qing dynasties. Recommended: HSTAS 453 or equivalent.

HSTAS 572-574 Seminar in Twentieth Century Chinese History, 3-6 cr.
Materials and methods for research in imperial Chinese history. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Chinese. Recommended: HSTAS 453, HSTAS 560, HSTAS 561, or equivalent.

HSTAS 579/ JSIS A 576 Modern Chinese History, 5 cr.
Introduction to the major English-language literature on modern Chinese history and to the major historiographical issues of the period. Prerequisite: HSTAS 454 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. Offered: jointly with JSIS A 576.

 


 

International Business 

 

I BUS 440 Business in Asia, 4 cr.
Major aspects of the Asian business environment and how Asian enterprises are managed. Problems and opportunities of foreign corporations in Asia. Prerequisite: I BUS 300; may not be repeated.

I BUS 461 Science, Technology, and Innovation Policies in East Asia, 5 cr.
Role of state and technological change in economic development. Analyzes state and corporate technology policies historically. Basic technology concepts, institutions, and policies in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. Examines sources of Asia' s rise in world of technology and explores whether conditions for its success will continue.

 


 

International Studies: Core Courses (JSIS)

 

JSIS 203 Rise of Asia, 5 cr.
Key themes in the study of Asia, with focus on the present. Topics include: the notion of "Asia;" cultural and religious similarities and differences; comparison of colonial experiences under Western and Asian powers; World War II and liberation; postwar patterns of economic and political development; social patterns and issues. Offered: A.

JSIS 459 Topics in the Buddhism of Tibet, 5 cr. 
Topics in the development of Buddhism of Tibet. Includes the relationship between reasoning and religious thought; the concept of a person; the formation of the different schools of Tibetan Buddhism; the notion of lineage; the master-disciple relationship in the tantric tradition. Recommended: ANTH 352, RELIG 202, RELIG 350, or RELIG 354.

JSIS 478 Special Topics Global, 1-5 cr.
Course content varies by quarter and instructor. Offered occasionally by visiting or resident faculty. Reference current time schedule.

JSIS 490 Special Topics Religion, 1-5 cr. 
Topics vary with each offering.

JSIS 578 Special Topics Global, 2-5 cr.
Seminar. Course content varies by quarter and instructor. Offered occasionally by visiting or resident faculty. Reference current time schedule.


 

International Studies: Area Studies Courses (JSIS A)

 

JSIS A 346/ HSTAS 348 Alternative Routes to Modernity, 5 cr.
For course description see HSTAS 348

JSIS A 370/ ANTH 370 Han Chinese Society and Culture, 5 cr.
For course description see ANTH 370

JSIS A 401 Asia and the World, 5 cr.
Overview of major issues and developments in the interactions of Northeast and Southeast Asia and he world. Topics include economic development and integration, sources of instability, and historical patterns of relations. Particular focus on major current issues related to the region. Prerequisite: JSIS B 200, JSIS 203.

JSIS A 403/ ANTH 444 Representation and Power in Modern China, 5 cr.
For course description see ANTH 444

JSIS A 404/ ANTH 447 Religion in China, 5 cr.
For course description see ANTH 447

JSIS A 405/ ANTH 449 Social Transformation of Modern East Asia, 5 cr.
Comparative study of social change in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam since 1945. Concentration on small-scale social units in rural and urban areas under both communist and capitalist political systems. Recommended: two history or anthropology of East Asia courses. Offered: jointly with ANTH 449.

JSIS A 406/ ANTH 406 China’s Environment, 5 cr.
For course description see ANTH 406

JSIS A 408/ POL S 442 Government & Politics of China, 5 cr.
For course description see POL S 442

JSIS A 431/ SOC 434 Demographic Issues in Asia, 3-5 cr.
For course description see SOC 434

JSIS A 454/ HIST 454 History of Modern China, 5 cr.
For course description see HIST 454

JSIS A 456/ HIST 456 Chinese Social History, 5 cr.
For course description see HIST 456

JSIS A 459/ POL S 419 U.S.-China Relations, 5 cr.
For course description see POL S 419

JSIS A 460/ HSTAS 460 Cities in China: Past and Present, 5 cr.
For course description see HSTAS 460

JSIS A 464/ SOC 464 Contemporary Society in the People’s Republic of China, 5 cr.
For course description see SOC 464

JSIS A 470/ ANTH 470 Minority Peoples of China, 5 cr.
For course description see ANTH 470

JSIS A 521 Seminar: Introduction to the Interdisciplinary Study of China, 5 cr.
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to major issues, approaches, and themes in the study of modern China. It is a required course of all first year students in the China Regional studies M.A. program. It will help to promote critical thinking about China and scholarship on China and help prepare students to write a major research paper in the required follow on course, SISEA 522 in the spring.

JSIS A 532/ POL S 532 The Chinese Political System, 5 cr. 
For course description see POL S 532

JSIS A 535/ POL S 535 International Relations of Modern China, 5 cr.
For course description see POL S 535

JSIS A 541/ LAW B 541 Law in East Asia: China, 3 cr.
For course description see LAW B 541

JSIS A 576/ HSTAS 579 Modern Chinese History, 5 cr.
For course description see HSTAS 579

JSIS 590 Special Topics, 2-5 cr.
Offered occasionally by visitors or resident faculty. Course content varies. 


 


 

International Studies: Global and Topical Courses (JSIS B)

 

JSIS B 202 Introduction to World Religions: Eastern Traditions, 5 cr.
History of religions, concentrating on religions that have developed in South Asia and East Asia. Primary attention to Hinduism and Buddhism; other important Asian religions are discussed in relation to them, with emphasis on basic conceptual and symbolic structures.

JSIS B 356/ ANTH 352 Buddhism and Society: The Theravada Buddhist Tradition in South and Southeast Asia, 5 cr.
Religious tradition of Theravada Buddhism (as practiced in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia). Variations in ethical orientations developed through Theravada Buddhist ideas. Recommended: JSIS B 202 or one eastern religions course.

JSIS B 354 Buddhism, 5 cr. 
Buddhism as a religious way and as a way of thinking; the forms of Buddhism known in South Asia (India, Sri Lanka) and those introduced from there to Tibet and other parts of Central Asia. Includes the "Three Jewels" (i.e., the Buddha or Awakened Person, the Teaching [Dharma], and Community [Sangha]) around which Buddhism is traditionally articulated. Recommended: RELIG 202 or one Asian cultures course.

JSIS B 419/ COM 420/ POL S 468 Comparative Media Systems: China, Hong Kong, Canada, 5 cr.
Provides students an understanding of policies that shape national communication processes and systems. Uses comparative analysis to identify both similarities and differences among media structures of nations at different levels of development. Primary emphasis on broadcast media. Offered: jointly with COM 420/POL S 468.

JSIS B 502 Religion in Comparative Perspective, 5-15cr. 
Analysis of selected theme or symbols in relation to several different religious traditions. Topics vary. Prerequisite: admission to the comparative religion MAIS program or permission of instructor.



 

International Studies: Infrequently Taught Course (JSIS D)

 

JSIS D 443/ ANTH 446 Class and Culture in East Asia, 5 cr.
For course description see ANTH 446

JSIS D 531 Chinese History: Research Methods and Bibliographic Guides, 3-6 cr.
Introductory research seminar dealing with the methodological and bibliographical problems concerning all periods and aspects of Chinese history from the earliest times to the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: two years of classical or modern Chinese.

 

 


 

Law

 

LAW B 541/ JSIS A 541 Law in East Asia: China, 3 cr.
Introduction to the institutions and processes of the Chinese legal system. Focuses on the contemporary system and its role in relation to political, economic and social developments. Examines legal aspects governing foreign trade and investment in China.
 


 

Near Eastern Languages and Civilization

 

NEAR E 364 Islam and Muslims in China, 5 cr.
Introduces the lived experiences of Muslims in contemporary China. Examines Muslims' understanding of their faith; the relationship of Islam to the political, economic, and social lives of Muslims; how Islam shapes people' s sense of culture and identity; and unity and diversity of various Chinese Muslim communities.

NEAR E 564 Islams and Muslims in China, 5 cr.
Introduces the lived experiences of Muslims in contemporary China. Examines Muslims' understanding of their faith; the relationship of Islam to the political, economic, and social lives of Muslims; how Islam shapes people' s sense of culture and identity; and unity and diversity of various Chinese Muslim communities.

TKIC 417 Introduction to Uygur, 5 cr.
Designed for students with no prior knowledge of Uygur. Includes acquisition of Uighur Arabic alphabet, general phonological rules, and basic grammar. Basic reading, listening, and oral comprehension practice all offered throughout the course. First in a sequence of three. Offered: A.

TKIC 418 Elementary Uygur, 5 cr.
Continuation of basic modern Uygur: phonological rules, grammar, and vocabulary. Practice in reading, listening, and oral comprehension. Second in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: TKIC 417. Offered: W.

TKIC 419 Elementary Uygur, 5 cr.
Continuation of basic modern Uygur: phonological rules, grammar, and vocabulary. Practice in reading, listening, and oral comprehension. Third in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: TKIC 418. Offered: Sp.

TKIC 427 Intermediate Uygur, 5 cr.
Second-year Uygur. Includes reading, translation, oral comprehension, and composition. First in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: TKIC 419. Offered: A.

TKIC 428 Intermediate Uygur, 5 cr.
Second-year Uygur. Includes reading, translation, oral comprehension, and composition. First in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: TKIC 419. Offered: A.

TKIC 429 Intermediate Uygur, 5 cr.
Second-year Uygur. Includes reading, translation, oral comprehension, and composition. First in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: TKIC 419. Offered: A.

TKIC 437 Advanced Uygur, 5 cr.
Focuses on reading, writing, translation, and oral comprehension at an advanced level. Students gain fluency in order to work in social and scientific environments where only the Uygur language is used. First in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: TKIC 429. Offered: A.

TKIC 438 Advanced Uygur, 5 cr.
Focuses on reading, writing, translation, and oral comprehension at an advanced level. Students gain fluency in order to work in social and scientific environments where only the Uygur language is used. Second in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: TKIC 437. Offered: W.

TKIC 439 Advanced Uygur, 5 cr.
Focuses on reading, writing, translation, and oral comprehension at an advanced level. Students gain fluency in order to work in social and scientific environments where only the Uygur language is used. Third in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: TKIC 438. Offered: Sp.

TKIC 547 Old Uygur, 3 cr.
Introduction to script systems; phonology, morphology, and syntax. Reading and translation of mainly Buddhist texts in Uygur script, eighth through eleventh centuries. Prerequisite: background in a Turkic language or permission of instructor.

 


 

Political Science

 

POL S 419/ JSIS A 459 U.S.-China Relations, 5 cr.
Surveys the history of United States-China relations and examines the evolution of bilateral relations, particularly since 1949. Focus on the period since 1972 and the major issues as they have evolved since that time, including trade, human rights, security, and Taiwan.

POL S 442/ JSIS A 408 Government & Politics of China, 5 cr.
Is China the next capitalist wonderland or the next evil empire? Following the U.S. media, it’s easy to get confused. This course will help you get beneath media rhetoric about the Middle Kingdom by taking a closer look at the Chinese polity, society, and economy. We will address a number of important issues, including (1) the roots of the revolution that led to the establishment of the People’s Republic; (2) the human and institutional legacies of the planned economy and Leninist political system; (3) the nature of the transition to a more market-oriented economy; (4) the potential for democratization in a more open polity; (5) the impact of the reforms on the global environment, population growth, labor conditions, and gender relations, and, last but certainly not least, (6) Chinese nationalism, China-Taiwan relations, and U.S.-China relations at the beginning of the 21st century.

POL S 468/ SIS 419/ COM 420 Comparative Media Systems: China, Hong Kong, Canada, 5 cr.
For course description see SIS 419

POL S 532/ JSIS A 532 The Chinese Political System, 5 cr.
Examination of key approaches, interpretations, and secondary literature in the study of contemporary Chinese politics. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Offered: jointly with JSIS A 532.

POL S 535/ JSIS A 535 International Relations of Modern China, 5 cr.
Foreign policy of the People's Republic of China: historical antecedents; domestic and international systemic determinants; and Chinese policies toward major states, regions, and issues. Prerequisite: a course on contemporary Chinese politics or history, or permission of instructor.

 


 

Sociology

 

SOC 434/ JSIS A 431 Demographic Issues in Asia, 3-5 cr.
Contemporary Asian countries face a number of issues with demographic components, including environmental and resource issues, ethnic rivalries, international migration, and public health. This seminar addresses a set of these issues by focusing on the demography of one or more countries in Asia. Offered: jointly with SISEA 434.

SOC 464/ JSIS A 464 Contemporary Society in the People’s Republic of China, 5 cr.
This course provides an overview of social change in China since 1949, with particular emphasis on aspects of civil society in the period of market reform. The first half of the course provides a roughly chronological account of the establishment of socialist institutions in rural and urban China, and describes social stratification, mobility, and social control in the Mao period. The second half focuses on particular aspects of state and society relations in the period of market reforms, including the rising salience of the legal system, non-governmental organizations, religious activism, and state management of information. The format of the class will include lectures, video documentaries, and discussion. 

China Studies Program
East Asia Studies
Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195
chinast@u.washington.edu

Madeleine Yue Dong, Chair
yuedong@u.washington.edu

Asia Studies Program Coordinator
chinast@u.washington.edu

China Studies Program Coordinator
Curtis Reed
chinast@u.washington.edu
cgreed@uw.edu