2007-2008 Events Report 

The following is a listing of all Center sponsored events in 2007-08. Each of the programs listed here is supported, in part, by a U.S. Department of Education, Title VI grant and/or a Program Enhancement Grant from Foreign Affairs, Canada. The Center would like to thank these grantors and the Jackson School of International Studies, the University of Washington, and the many programs on campus and in the community that have also contributed to the success of Center educational events. In 2007-08 this support resulted in just over 50 educational programs impacting a total of over 4,000 faculty, students, educators and community members.

Return to Current Report

Event Categories
Academic Conferences and Symposia - 965 served
Professional Development for Educators - 626 served
Public Lectures - 855 served
Business and Trade Programs - 337 served
Canadian Author Readings and Films - 1,399 served
Media Coverage - 125,000 reached

Academic Conferences and Symposia
26 October 2007 - Symposium on Bilingualism
"Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Early Bilingualism: Developmental and Educational Issues 2007-08" with special guest, Dr. John Archibald, Linguistics, University of Alberta addressing, "The Innocent Phonologist: Linguist as Policy Advisor in Alberta Second Language Programs."
Center Faculty Lead: Julia Herschensohn, Linguistics
Co-sponsor: U.W. Simpson Center for the Humanities
Program
Attendance: 70 faculty, graduate students

4-5 January 2008 - Symposium on Population Health
"Third Annual Symposium: Population Health and Cross-Border Collaboration," with guest speaker Dr. Clyde Hertzman presenting on, "Population Health, Human Development and the Canada-US Divide.”
Center Faculty Lead: Jack Thompson, Public Health and Community Medicine
Co-sponsor: U.W. School of Public Health and Community Medicine
Program
Wiki Site for Symposium - "UWuser" password: "Seattle"
Attendance: 75 members of the public health community

31 January 2008 - Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium Annual Meeting
Vancouver, British Columbia
The Canadian Studies Center is the Secretariat for the Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium. This January the Consortium met at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C. The meeting was an all-day series of presentations by faculty and students on both research and teaching including, "Global Warming and Polar Bears," by Amy Lovecraft, University of Alaska, Fairbanks; "Prince Rupert - the New Pacific Gateway for Canada," by Anne Goodchild, University of Washington and Gary Wilson, University of Northern British Columbia; and the recent border conference hosted by Western Washington University and the University of Victoria presented by Don Alper, WWU.
Attendance: 60 faculty from Washington State, Oregon, Alaska, British Columbia and Alberta

31 January 2008 – Focus the Nation Panel
3-4:30 p.m., Husky Union Building, 209B
The Burke and U.W. will participate in "Focus the Nation," a national day of education and political engagement on the subject of climate change. The Burke is hosting a panel of U.W. students with an intimate knowledge of cultures that will be particularly impacted by global warming. They will present from the perspectives of the Marshall Islands in the South Pacific, the Inuit of Canada, and the Tibetan region of China. Tim Pasch Doctoral Candidate in Communication and 2007-08 FLAS Fellow in Inuktitut will present on the impact of climate change on Inuit communities in Nunavik, Québec where he spent the summer of 2007.
Co-sponsor: Burke Museum
Details for Focus the Nation all-day event
Details for Focus the Nation panel
Attendance: 75 members of the U.W. community

7-10 February 2008 - Field Trip to Vancouver, British Columbia
Canadian Studies affiliate and professor in the School of Social Work, Stan de Mello, led a field trip to Vancouver as part of the Social Work Practice Seminar. The field trip provided students with a first-hand view of Canada's approaches to multiculturalism and social work. In particular the visit will allowed students to experience how the Chinese community in Vancouver, as an exemplar, has been shaped and influenced by the changing cultural and sociopolitical environment. Students had an opportunity to discuss the implications for providing culturally appropriate social services as a result of these changes.
Attendance: 28 Social Work majors

21 February 2008 - Seattle Urban Sustainability Forum
5-7 p.m., Seattle City Hall,600 Fourth Ave., Seattle
The City of Seattle Urban Sustainability Forum is working with the Center to provide Canadian perspectives and best-practices for food security issues. This forum entitled, "Sustainable Cities, Food and Neighborhoods: Do They Relate? features Wayne Roberts, Ph.D., Toronto Food Policy Council addressed the issue from a Canadian perspective. The Center wants to thank Foreign Affairs, Canada for making this event possible and enabling the Center to impact city developers and home owners via green building education. Panelists include Steven Cohen, City of Portland, OR, Food Policy & Programs, Office of Sustainable Development, Devorah Kahn, City of Vancouver, BC, Food Policy Coordinator, Food Policy Team and Center affiliate, Branden Born, University of Washington, WA, Assistant Professor, Department of Urban Design and Planning.
Co-sponsors: City of Seattle, Department of Planning and Development
Registration: Free and open to the public
More information: Seattle Department of Planning and Development, Transformational Lecture Series website
Details
Attendance: 49 City of Seattle staff

22 February 2008 - Lecture on Canadian Food Security
2 p.m., 440 Gould Hall, University of Washington, Seattle campus
Wayne Roberts, Project Coordinator for the Toronto Food Policy Council provided a lecture/discussion entitled, "Cities and Food Policy: Learning from the Canadian Experience." The presentation pointed out what we can learn from one of the leading food policy councils in North America and Canada-U.S. differences in planning, public health and food security.
Co-sponsors: U.W. Department of Urban Design and Planning
Questions: Branden Born, bborn@u.washington.edu
Attendance: 12 Graduate Students

28 February-1 March 2008 - 6th Annual Native Voices Film Festival
The 6th Annual Native Voices Film Festival will be held at the end of February/early March to celebrate the documentary work of U.W. students and special guests including several First Nations film directors from Canada. Films include The Honor of All (1987, 50:00) a groundbreaking work about the Alkali Lake Band of Indians in British Columbia and their successful struggle to conquer alcoholism in their remote community with special guest appearances by the directors and actors. For a full listing of dates, times and films see the film festival website.
Details
Attendance: 210 members of the University and Seattle community

7 March 2008 - Undergraduate Student Conference
9:45 a.m.-5 p.m., Henry Art Gallery Auditorium, University of Washington Seattle campus
"Crossing Borders - Issues and Resolutions" is an all-day series of students debates regarding critical issues facing the Canada-U.S. relationship today. Former US Senator Slade Gorton served as the chief judge, and was joined by Father Michael Trelevean, Executive Director, Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium, Ian Moncaster, President, World Affairs Council, and Dr. Henry Peterson, Seattle Pacific University. The Canadian Studies Center is proud to announce that two University of Washington students were selected to participate in the Conference, Sandley Chou, major, International Studies and History, and Lu Jiang, major, Business Administration and minor in Political Science. Lu Jiang and her partner, John Kardosh from University of Alberta won $250 each in prize money for their presentation on U.S.-Canada Border Security.
9:45-11:15 - Sovereignty over the Northwest Passage
11:30-1:00 - U.S.-Canada Border Security
1:45-3:15 - U.N./Multilateral Diplomacy
3:30-5 - Gun Control in Canada and the U.S.
Sponsors: The Canadian Consulate, Seattle; the Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium
Information: Kevin Cook, Canadian Consulate, kevin.cook@international.gc.ca
Event Flyer
Attendance: 50 members of the University community

7 March 2008 - Awards Dinner and Reception
7:30 p.m., Rainier Club, 820 Fourth Ave., Seattle
"Crossing Borders - Issues and Resolutions" student conference awards banquet and reception honored those students who did were judged the top debaters in the all-day conference. Lu Jiang, UW history and business student and her partner, John Kardosh from University of Alberta won $250 each in prize money for their presentation on U.S.-Canada Border Security.
Sponsors: The Canadian Consulate, Seattle; the Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium
Invitation
Attendance: 75 faculty, students and community member

Monday, 31 March 2008 – Canadian Traditional Music Collection Opening
7-9:30 p.m., Burke Room, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Seattle. In 2007 the Canadian Studies Center opened a Canadian Traditional Music Collection in the U.W. Libraries. The special collection comprises over 200 items ranging from CDs and DVDs to books and LPs. The opening included a presentation on the collection by Devon Léger, Northwest Folklife, and creator of the collection who played examples from the collection during the presentation and Lisa Ornstein who gave a lecture on 400 years of French music in Canada as well as provided the audience with a performance of her dynamic fiddling. (The Traditional Canadian Music collection is spread throughout the library system and is accessible through the Canada Studies website http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/resources_music.shtml. )
Co-sponsors: University of Washington Libraries
Details
Attendance: 40 members of the UW and Seattle community

3-4 April 2008 - 3rd Annual Canadian Studies Grad Student Symposium
3 April, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Bryon and Alice Lockwood Forest Club Room, Anderson Hall 207

Attendance: 15 graduate students

4 April, 8 a.m.-Noon, Bryon and Alice Lockwood Forest Club Room, Anderson Hall 207
With special guests Dr. Patrick James, Director, Center for International Studies, University of Southern California and President, Association of Canadian Studies in the U.S. and Dr. Donald Alper, Director, Canadian-American Studies Center and Border Policy Research Institute, Western Washington University.
Grad Student Chairs: Jeff Cao and Mihyun Seol, Doctoral Program, Center for International Trade in Forest Products, School of Forest Resources
See Annual Grad Symposium
Program
Attendance: 8 graduate students

4 April 2008 - MBA Study Tour to Canada Reception
4-5 p.m., Seminar Room (4th Floor), Bank of America Executive Education Center, U.W. Campus
The 2008 MBA students who participated in the annual Study Tour in February will provide a power point presentation of their tour and discuss the impact the tour had on their understanding of the Canada-U.S. trade relationship and North America's integrated economy.
Sponsor: Canadian Consulate, Seattle
Attendance: 10 MBA students

11-13 April 2008 - FAME Conference
Olympic Park Institute, Port Angeles, Washington
The FAME network is an association of graduate students from Canada and the U.S. who are interested in a variety of aspects of fisheries, marine and nearshore ecosystems and the organisms that inhabit them. The annual FAME conference provides a forum for graduate students to share research and network with peers. The conference encourages collaboration and camaraderie between graduate students from University of Washington, Oregon State University, Simon Fraser University, Washington State University and University of British Columbia. The Canadian Studies Center encourages and supports conference papers/presentations that address cross-border issues such as Canada-U.S. marine management and policy making (collaborative management or best practices); current issues facing local marine and coastal ecosystems in Canada and the U.S.; or proposals/papers that seek to further collaborative research between the two countries. Congratulations to this year's FAME Scholarship for Canada-U.S. Research recipient, Mark Gleason, Marine Affairs, who was awarded $200 for his paper on cross-border fisheries cooperatives.
Attendance: 70 graduate students from Canada and the U.S.

14 April 2008 - Roundtable with Maude Barlow
3:30-5 p.m., Southeast Dining Room, University Club, University of Washington, Seattle campus
Maude Barlow is the National Chairperson of The Council of Canadians, Canada’s largest citizens’ advocacy organization with members and chapters across Canada, as well as the co-founder of the Blue Planet Project which works to stop commodification of the world’s water. She is also a Director with the International Forum on Globalization, a San Francisco based research and education institution opposed to economic globalization. Maude is the recipient of numerous educational awards and has received honorary doctorates from six Canadian universities for her social justice work as well as the recipient of the “2005/2006 Lannan Cultural Freedom Fellowship.” Most recently she received the prestigious “2005 Right Livelihood Award” given by the Swedish Parliament and widely referred to as “The Alternative Nobel.” She is the best-selling author or co-author of fifteen books. Her most recent publications are Too Close For Comfort: Canada’s Future Within Fortress North America; and Blue Gold: The Fight to Stop Corporate Theft of the World’s Water (with Tony Clarke), now published in 47 countries. Her most recent book, Blue Covenant: The Global Water Crisis and the Fight for the Right to Water, New Press, 2007 was the focus of the roundtable discussion.
Attendance: 18 UW faculty, graduate students and undergrads

26 April 2008 - International Studies Knowledge Bowl!
10:30-12:00 a.m., Thomson Hall Room 101, UW Campus
As part of Washington Weekend, the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies will be offering the Jackson School International Knowledge Bowl! Test your global IQ in a fun interactive knowledge bowl sponsored by the Outreach Centers of theHenry M. Jackson School of International Studies! Professor Wolf Latsch will host this educational and entertaining 90 minute session covering topics from geography and history to current events and political figures. All ages are encouraged to participate. Don’t miss the fun, prizes will be awarded!
Details
Attendance: 45 UW and community members

13 May 2008 – Roundtable Presentation on Inuit Governance
5:30-7:30 p.m., Burke Room, Burke Museum, University of Washington campus, Seattle
"Inuit Self-Government in the Canadian Arctic: The Creation of the Nunavik Regional Government – Innovation and Challenges," by Donat Savoie - Donat Savoie outlined the political and historical context of the innovative governance project of Nunavik. He discussed the present governance arrangements and institutions in Nunavik created pursuant to the signing in 1975 of the James Bay and Northern Québec Agreement, the impact of the report of the Nunavik Commission in determining the scope and vision of the project, the main elements pertaining to the Nunavik Regional Government, the future steps in the process, and the challenges that lie ahead.

Donat Savoie entered the Public Service of Canada where he worked for 37 years and occupied several senior positions in Inuit, Arctic and Circumpolar Affairs in the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, including the position of Director of Scientific and Circumpolar Affairs. Until his recent retirement, Mr. Savoie was for several years, Chief Federal Negotiator for the Nunavik Self-government Project. Under an Executive Interchange Program, he acted as Senior Advisor to Mary Simon, then President of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, and was the Federal Head Organizer of the visit of Pope John Paul II in 1987 to Fort Simpson, Northwest Territories (Canada). He has received, all along his career, several prestigious awards from the Government of Canada, the Government of the Northwest Territories, the academic sector, and from the Inuit of Nunavik (Northern Québec) and the community of Kangiqsualujjuaq in Nunavik where he lived with Tivi Etok family in 1967-1968.
Sponsorship: This event is sponsored by the Canadian Studies Center and the Avataq Cultural Institute, Nunavik, Québec
Power point presentation
Attendance: 20 members of the campus and Seattle community

14 May 2008 – Roundtable on Inuit Culture and Language
5:30-7:30 p.m., Forum, Room 309, Parrington Hall, University of Washington campus, Seattle
"Preserving Inuit Culture and Language – the Avataq Cultural Institute in Nunavik, Québec," by Elisapi Novalinga
Elisapi Novalinga will discussed the history and success of the Avataq Cultural Institute. Founded in 1980, Avataq is a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting and promoting the language and culture of Inuit in Nunavik (Northern Québec). The programs and services of the Avataq Cultural Institute include: an Inuktitut promotion and preservation program, a genealogy program, a Nunavik museums program, a Nunavik Inuit art collection, an archaeology department, an artists’ support program, a documentation and archives centre, local cultural committees, traditional skills courses, as well as a research and publications service. Through its language, heritage and cultural programs, the Avataq Cultural Institute is striving to support and preserve Inuit culture for present and future generations.

Elisapi Novalinga grew up in Puvirnituq Nunavik, the northern most region of Québec. She finished high school in 1995 and relocated to Montreal, Canada to continue her education, earning a college diploma in Special Education from Cégep Marie-Victorin in 2002. After graduation, she decided to live in Montreal on a permanent basis. She was hired as a receptionist at Avataq Cultural Institute 2002 and was promoted to Information Officer in 2004. Her current duties include assisting visitors and researchers to the Institute, its documentation centre and archives, and organizing the Nunavik Inuit Elders Conference, a major event for the entire region that is held every two years.
Sponsorship: This event is sponsored by the Canadian Studies Center and the Avataq Cultural Institute, Nunavik, Québec
Attendance: 15 members of the campus and Seattle community

21 May 2008 - The Cold Rush: Arctic Energy - Faculty/Student Luncheon
Peterson Room, Allen Library, University of Washington Seattle campus
The race (“cold rush”) is on to find oil and gas in the melting Arctic. As technology keeps improving, the price of oil keeps rising, and the ice keeps melting, Arctic energy is bound to be an increasingly bigger part of the global mix. This luncheon provided an opportunity for faculty, graduate students and special guests to discuss Arctic energy issues from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Guests included Peter Sharp, Senior Policy Analyst, Energy Secretariat, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Canada; Ben Ellis, Member, Executive Committee, Arctic Council's Energy Action Team and Managing Director, Institute of the North; and Mikhail Alexseev, Associate Professor, Political Science, San Diego State University; and faculty, graduate students, and UW administrators.
Event Poster
Sponsors: Center for Global Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies; Program on the Environment, UW; Canadian Consulate, Seattle
Attendance: 20 faculty, students, community members

Professional Development for Educators
13 October 2007 - Educator Workshop
The Washington State Council for the Social Studies held its annual in-service for educators featuring a lecture entitled, "Canada in Your Classroom," by Meghan Hoyer, St. Philomena School; Vice-President, Washington State Geographic Alliance;
Teacher Associate, K-12 STUDY CANADA.
Co-sponsor: Washington State Council for the Social Studies
Attendance: 20 K-8 educators

28 November 2008 – Classroom Presentations – Kent, Washington
Tim Pasch, Doctoral Candidate and 2007-08 FLAS Fellow in Inuktitut gave two lectures to Grade 11 students at Kentridge High School. The talks were entitled, “Inukjuak: A Personal Journey” and “Nunavik: The Newest Inuit Homeland.”
Attendance: 30 high school students

14-15 January 2008 - Educator Workshop - Minnesota
"The Geography of the Neighborhood: Canada and the U.S." was held in Milleapolis in conjunction with the Minnesota Humanities Center and the Canadian Consulate, Minneapolis for K-12 Minnesota educators. The workshop will included two presentations by Nadine Fabbi, Canadian Studies Center: "Canadian Symbols - Using Symbols to Teach about History and Culture," and ""Multiculturalism: A Canadian Philosophy Emerges from a Unique History of Immigration and a Minority Nationalist Movement."
Program
Attendance: 30 educators

2 February 2008 - K-8 Educator Conference
8 a.m.-2 p.m., Loyola Hall, Seattle University
Special Grade Level Presentations by Librarians from all over Washington State who will be sharing resources, trade books, grade level appropriate research skills, and ideas for using technology. The conference will include a presentation by on aboriginal children's literature in Canada by Martha Dietz, Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations, at the UW and instructor in the Academic English Program.
Information: http://www.wscss.org/
Bibliography
Attendance: 15 K-8 educators

29 February 2008 - World Languages Day
UW Campus
UW World Languages Day will feature speakers on Canadian aboriginal languages and on Québec culture and language including Cody Case, Master's Program, Ethnomusicology and 2007-08 FLAS recipient, who will present on "Hip-hop and Cultural Identity in Québec" and Tim Pasch, Doctoral Program, Communication and 2007-08 FLAS recipient who will provide, "An Introduction to Inuktitut - the Language of the Inuit."
Details
Attendance:
"Hip-Hop and Cultural Identity in Québec: 250 high school students
"An Introduction to Inuktitut: 50 high school students

7-9 March 2008 – Leadership Retreat for Educators, Lake Chelan, Washington
The Washington State Council for Social Studies is holding its annual leadership retreat, “Telling Our Stories” at the Campbell Resort in Lake Chelan. Tim Pasch, Doctoral Candidate, Communication and 2007-08 FLAS Fellow will be presenting on Canada’s Inuit. His presentation is entitled, "Social Networking in the Arctic or, Why are Inuit youth are so interested in MySpace, Facebook and Bebo?"
Sponsors: Washington State Council for Social Studies
Attendance: 25 educations from Washington state

22 March 2008 - K-8 Educator Workshop
The annual Jackson School K-8 Mosaic workshop was entitled, "Hands on the World: Connecting Crafts and Cultures in the K-8 Curriculum." This all-day workshop (7 clock hours) featured a presentation on how to build an Inuit inukshuk in the classroom and how the inukshuk can be used to teach your students about the Arctic and Inuit. The presentation on the inukshuk was by Nadine Fabbi, Canadian Studies Center.
Details
Attendance: 55 local educators

29 March 2008 - Educator Workshop - 8th Annual Documentary Film Workshop
8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., $45 (includes 8 clock hours, continental breakfast and lunch) - UW Campus
This one-day workshop will introduce educators to the documentary film genre and to several recent films that depict contemporary events and issues around the world. The workshop will begin with an introduction to documentary film by co-director of Native Voices (a University of Washington aboriginal documentary film program), Professor Daniel Hart. Professor Hart will discuss how documentary should be analyzed and utilized as a teaching tool.

Following this introduction, the workshop will feature regional specialists and filmmakers who will introduce films effective for educational use as well as provide extensive curriculum materials to participants. The films will address a wide range of issues, regions and challenges for ethnic minorities and nations. The documentaries include Masizakhe: Building Each Other about the political and cultural liberation of South Africa; Nazrah: A Muslim Woman’s Perspective about current challenges faced by Muslim women in the Northwest; The Weeping Camel, focused on the lives of Mongolian camel herders; and Qallunaat: Why White People are Funny, produced by Canada’s Inuit who reverse the usual “anthropological gaze.”
Workshop flyer
Registration form
Presenter Bios
Film Descriptions
Co-sponsor: Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Outreach Center
Attendance: 35 local educators and community college instructors

22 May 2008 - Presentation to Elementary School Students
John Hay Elementary, Seattle
Kim England, Affiliated Faculty of Canadian Studies and Professor, Geography, provided a presentation on Canada's North to the students in Ms. Hanson's Fourth Grade class. The presentation included the dissemination of maps, the Nunavut coat of arms and flag, and a screening of the Inuit video, "The Owl and the Raven."
Attendance: 34 Fourth Grade class members

31 May 2008 - Québec Workshop - $45 ($20 for students)
9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Walker-Ames Room, Kane Hall, University of Washington Campus
(Registration fee includes 6 clock hours, continental breakfast and lunch. Students enrolling must include a photocopy of their student card.)
"Enseigner le français: La société québécoise comme outil didactique," is an all-day workshop for French educators, students of French and others who are interested in honing their French language skills. The workshop will be lead by Professor Thierry Giasson, Université Laval with presentations by UW graduate students whose research includes Québec.
Co-sponsor: This event is co-sponsored with the UW in the High School Program
Information/Registration
Workshop Program
Presenter Bios
Sponsor Information
Educational Resources on Québec
Materials: href="/canada/events/Who's who de la culture populaire québécoise
Powerpoint: La culture populaire du Québec
Powerpoint: Un portrait des blogueurs politique du Québec
Québec Map
Attendance: 25 French educators and students

22-27 June 2008 - K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute
"Experience B. - From the 5 Themes of Geography to the 2010 Winter Olympics: Hot Issues from a Not-So-Cold Climate"
Sunday, June 22-Monday, June 23, Terminal City Club Tower Hotel, Vancouver, British Columbia
Tuesday, June 24-Friday, June 17, Crystal Lodge at Whistler, British Columbia
Learn about British Columbia, Canada and global warming in a comfortable classroom setting from government officials, tribal leaders and university faculty. This 6-day institute will provide educators with a background in Canadian culture, history, geography and the environment as well as give a preview of the 2010 Olympics.
Sponsor: Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University
Program
Attendance: 25 educators from around the US

25-26 June 2008 - Educator Workshop
University of Washington, Seattle campus
This year's seminar, "Life Cycle Rituals and Traditions Across Cultures" focused on the major rites and rituals that underpin cultures around the world and that create community identity. With presentations featuring anthropologists, sociologists, historians, and political scientists this seminar encouraged teacher-participants as they work together designing classroom strategies centered on the seminar's theme. This two-day seminar is designed for middle school, high school and community college educators. Charlotte Coté provided a lecture on Canada entitled, "The Cultural and Spiritual Significance of the Makah and Nuu-chah-nulth Whaling Traditions in Canada and the US."
Event Flyer
Workshop Program
Attendance: 32 educators

Public Lectures
9 October -4 December 2007- Yellowstone to Yukon Lecture Series
"Yellowstone to Yukon: Freedom to Roam Lecture Series” was an 8-part lecture series exploring the science, politics, people and ethics behind the Y2Y vision.
Center Faculty Lead: Tom Hinckley, College of Forest Resources
Co-sponsor: U.W. Burke Museum
Y2Y Lecture Series postcard
Y2Y Seminar Posters
Attendance: 560 members of the University and greater Seattle communities

12, 28 February and 6, 13 March – The War of 1812 Lecture Series
10 a.m.-Noon, Edmonds Community College
The War of 1812 comes out of the evolution of political parties in the U.S. stemming back to the American Revolution. These lectures will include a background to the War of 1812, the Napoleonic Wars that lead up to the War of 1812, and the Canadian Loyalist population that maintain a close economic relationship to Great Britain during the War. This four-part lecture series will include viewings of contemporary films on this history. Presented by Douglas Jackson, Professor Emeritus, Geography and Jackson School of International Studies.
Co-sponsor: Creative Retirement Institute, Edmonds Community College
Attendance: 20 community members at each lecture

24-26 March 2008 - Shoreline Community College Lecture Series
12:45-2 p.m., Shoreline Community College, Lake Forest Park Towne Centre, Shoreline, WA
Wintercollege for Those Over Fifty is a 3-day series of educational workshops and lectures for community members. Each year the Jackson School of International Studies provides three lectures on international issues and events of interest and relevancy. This year, Canadian Studies Affiliated Faculty, Natalie Debray, provided a lecture on the history of Québec and Québec as a distinct society in Canada - "I Remember France: Québec History and its influence on Contemporary Society."
Sponsor: Shoreline Community College, Continuing Education Program
Registration/More information: www.shoreline.edu/ce
Attendance: 40 members of the community

27 March 2008 – Breakfast with Admiral Ty Pile, Maritime Forces Pacific - RESERVATION NECESSARY
8-9:30 a.m., University Club, Southeast Dining Room, University of Washington, Seattle campus
Rear-Admiral Ty Pile, CMM, CD, Commander, Maritime Forces Pacific, Canada was promoted to Rear-Admiral in June 2005 and appointed Chief of Staff Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources - Military) in Ottawa. On 11 May 2006, he became the Chief Military Personnel and Commander of Military Personnel Command and served in this position until July 2007. In 27 July of 2007, he assumed his present post in Victoria, British Columbia, as Commander of Maritime Forces Pacific, Joint Task Force (Pacific) and Joint Task Force Games (2010). Rear-Admiral Pile addressed the Canada-U.S. security relationship in the Pacific Northwest.
Attendance: 25 members of the UW community

31 March 2008 - Lecture on Québec
Boise State University, Boise, Idaho
Natalie Debray, Communication, provided a lecture to faculty and students at Boise State University as part of Canada Week. The lecture entitled, "French Culture in Québec," dealt with how the dual language media system in Canada shows diverse perspectives of events and topics. For instance, what the French-Canadians view as the conquest of 1763, English-Canadian newspapers portray as simply another battle.
Attendance: 35 faculty and students
Article on the lecture in the student newspaper, Arbiter

24 April 2008 - Lecture - Inuit in Nunavik
UW Campus
"The Inuit in Nunavik," by Tim Pasch, Communications, FLAS 2008-09
Tim Pasch provided a lecture to the COM 451 Evening Degree program on current issues in Nunavik in particular the status of the Inuit language and how it is being impacted by the use of the internet. "I found your presentation thought-provoking and inspiring. I think many people don t see a direct connection in how academic research can have a real impact on them or the world around them," student.
Attendance: 20 UW undergrads

Monday, 28 April 2008 - Roundtable on Canadian Humanitarian Law
1:30-3:20 p.m., Conference Room, University Club, University of Washington Seattle campus
"Canadian Perspectives on the Ottawa Land Mine Convention and the International Criminal Court," with Professor Andy Knight, Professor, International Relations, Department of Political Science, University of Alberta. Dr. Knight is the past Vice Chair of the Academic Council on the United Nations System and currently the editor of Global Governance Journal. His recent books include, Adapting the United Nations to a Post-Modern World, A Changing United Nations: Multilateral Evolutionand the Quest for Global Governance and Building Sustainable Peace (with Tom Keating). Professor Knight was recently awarded a major three-year research grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada to study "Children and Armed Conflict." Dr. Knight met with 25 students in Professor Rick Lorenz course, SISME 420: International Humanitarian Law to offer a Canadian perspectives on the issues raised in the class. The four students representing the "Canada Team" also met with Professor Knight following the class for one-on-one advising for their position papers.
For more information on Dr. W. Andy Knight see http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/~aknight/
Attendance: 25 undergraduate students

30 April 2008 - Lecture - Aboriginal Whaling
7 p.m., Walker-Ames Room (Room 225), Kane Hall, University of Washington Seattle campus
Charlotte Coté, Professor, American Indian Studies and Ryland Bowechop, with the Makah Tribal Council and the Makah Whaling Commission, addressed contemporary whaling issues in Canada and the U.S. They presented on "Contemporary Indigenous Whaling in Canada and the U.S.: Issues Concerning the Nuu-chah-nulth and Makah People's Right to Whale."
Co-sponsor: Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Outreach Centers
Details
Attendance: 65 university and community members

21 May 2008 - The Cold Rush: Arctic Energy - Panel Discussion
7 p.m., Room 220, Kane Hall, University of Washington campus
The race (“cold rush”) is on to find oil and gas in the melting Arctic. As technology keeps improving, the price of oil keeps rising, and the ice keeps melting, Arctic energy is bound to be an increasingly bigger part of the global mix. A panel of international energy experts a) discussing the Arctic as an energy frontier, united by resources, location/proximity, and environmental/logistical challenges; and b) introducing the work of the Arctic Council and its Arctic Energy Action Team.

Panelists included Peter Sharp, Senior Policy Analyst, Energy Secretariat, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Canada; Ben Ellis, Member, Executive Committee, Arctic Council's Energy Action Team and Managing Director, Institute of the North; and Mikhail Alexseev, Associate Professor, Political Science, San Diego State University.
Sponsors: Center for Global Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies; Program on the Environment, UW; Canadian Consulate, Seattle
This event is free and open to the public.
Event Flyer
Attendance: 65 members of the university and Seattle community

Business and Trade Programs
15 October 2007 - Luncheon/Lecture on Energy Policy in Canada
"The Present: Alberta’s Energy Policy and the U.S.," with Dan McFadyen, Deputy Minister for Energy, Province of Alberta.
Co-sponsor: World Affairs Council
Attendance: 40 members of the local business community

5 November 2007 - Business Forum - Clean Technologies, Seattle
The Canadian Studies Center is working with the Washington Clean Technology Alliance and local organizations to promote clean technology business opportunities including participation in Globe 2008 in Vancouver, British Columbia.
Click here for a program
Attendance: 30 members of the local business/government communities

6 November 2007 - Business Forum - Clean Technologies, Spokane
The Canadian Studies Center is working with the Washington Clean Technology Alliance and local organizations to promote clean technology
business opportunities including participation in Globe 2008 in Vancouver, British Columbia.
Click here for a program
Attendance: 18 members of the local business/government communities

12 December 2007 - Ambassador Breakfast
Canada's Ambassador to the U.S., The Honourable Michael Wison, hosted a University Presidents' breakfast at the University of Washington.
Co-sponsor: Canadian Consulate, Seattle
Click here for a copy of the Ambassador's Op Ed piece in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer
Click here for a Washington State Trade Fact Sheet from the Canadian Embassy, 2007
Attendance: 40 faculty representatives from regional universities

6 February 2008 - Business Leaders Forum
Noon-4:30 p.m. Pan Pacific Hotel, South Lake Union, Seattle
The Network for Innovation and Sustainability, in conjunction with the Center, offered a business leaders forum entitled, "Sustainable Development and Innovation in the 2010 Winter Olympics." The program included talks from Whistler's mayor, Ken Melamed, the Deputy City Manager of the False Creek, Vancouver Olympic Village, and the project director for the speed skating oval in Richmond, British Columbia.
Sponsor: Network for Innovation and Sustainability
For more information contact Mary Rose at 425-828-0982 or maryr@nbis.org
Flyer
Program
Attendance: 55 members of the local business community

15-18 February 2008 - MBA Study Tour to Canada
The 2008 Study Tour to Vancouver explored the rich economic, political and cultural environment of the city of Vancouver, British Columbia in the beautiful country of Canada. Students learned how Vancouver is gearing up for the Olympics and why it is one of the most cosmopolitan cities in North America. Canada is the USA’s largest trading partner and the city of Vancouver is booming!
MBA Chairs: Tania Elliot and Timothy Randall
Faculty Lead: Sukumar Periwal, 2006-07 Canada-U.S. Visiting Fulbright Chair, Canadian Studies Center
Co-sponsor: Global Business Center, U.W. Foster School of Business
Details
Program
Attendance: 14 MBA students

6-13 March 2008 – Health Tech Forum: Japan, Canada, U.S.A. - Vancouver, B.C., Portland, Oregon and Seattle
11 March, Urban Horticultural Center, University of Washington, Seattle campus
The tri-national health tech forum provided a platform for export development and facilitate relationship building, research collaboration and business development between the health technology communities in Japan, the Pacific Northwest and Western Canada. The HealthTech Forum participants had a full agenda in Seattle, with visits to Virginia Mason Medical Center, the Seattle Science Foundation, Microsoft, the Washington Technology Center, a quick UW campus tour and a reception at the official residence of the Japan Consul General. Many commented about the region's deep commitment to the advancement of medical technologies to improve and save lives.
Co-sponsor: Canadian Consulate, Seattle
Details
Attendance: 80 business leaders and health care professionals

30 April 2008 - Business and Trade Lecture
University of Washington campus
“Critical Reflections on Governing Through Risk,” by Dr. Benjamin J. Muller, Visiting Research Fellow, Border Policy Research Institute, Western Washington University
The lecture addressed the management of security, the avoidance of risk, "virtual borders," and counteracting the “thickening” of the Canada-U.S. border. Muller discussed how border security can be intensified while maintaining the imperatives of transnational commerce.
Co-sponsors: Border Policy Research Institute, Western Washington University
Powerpoint
Attendance: 35 graduate students

30 April 2008 - Business Lecture
5 p.m., Offices of K&L Gates LLP, Seattle
"The New Model for Port Development and Consequences for Regional Trade," by Professor Anne Goodchild, UW
Professor Goodchild addressed the on-going development of the Port of Prince Rupert and how it will affect ports and trade flows in British Columbia, Washington and Alaska. The lecture provided an excellent opportunity for local business owners and port authorities to ask questions in a casual setting about how the new Prince Rupert port may be a "threat" to local interests.
Co-sponsors: Canada-America Society and the Business America Business Council
Details/Registration
Covered in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, "New port in B.C. may pose threat," 30 April 2008
Attendance: 25 members of the business community

Canadian Author Readings and Films

29 January 2008 – Book Reading
Elliot Bay Book Company, 101 South Main Street, Seattle, 7:30 p.m.
Canadian Studies Affiliated Faculty, and Professor in French, Denyse Delcourt, read from her recently published novel set in Québec. Her 2001 novel, Garielle au bois dormant, published in Montréal, has been published in the U.S. as Gabrielle and the Long Sleep into Mourning (Green Integer, translated by Eugene Vance). A finalist for both the Prix Anne-Hébert and the Prix Marguerite-Duras, this gemlike novel brings together eight childhood friends together decades later, all in a house by a lake in Québec. The death of one of them is a central point for the stories that get told, the mysteries that slowly come to light.
Elliot Bay Book Company: http://www.elliottbaybook.com
Attendance: 25 members of the Seattle community

6 April 2008 - Canadian Author Reading
4:30 p.m., Elliot Bay Books, 101 South Main Street, Seattle
Eileen Delehanty Pearkes’ spiritual memoir, The Glass Seed: The Fragile Beauty of Heart, Mind and Memory (Timeless), begins with her mother’s increasing loss of memory due to Alzheimer’s – and its effect on her emotional connection with her daughter. Set in the mountains of British Columbia and drawing from mythology, history, and literature, this book is both a meditation on womanhood, and a reflection on healing. Eileen Pearkes is also the author of The Geography of Memory, and a contributor to ascent magazine.
Co-sponsor: Elliot Bay Book Company
Attendance: 20 community members

14 April 2008 - Canadian Author Reading
7:30 p.m., Elliot Bay Books, 101 South Main Street, Seattle
From Ottawa, we are honored to internationally-renowned environmental activist Maude Barlow. A recipient of Sweden’s Right Livelihood Award, a participant in the remarkable Benaroya Hall anti-globalization teach-in that preceded the Seattle WTO meetings in November 1999, Maude Barlow is especially known for her work in the water justice movement. She is the author of sixteen books, of which Blue Covenant: The Global Water Crisis and the Coming Battle for the Right to Water (The New Press) is the newest – and most timely. “Clean water is the bottom line of all bottom lines – and Maude Barlow shows, with compelling reporting, that we’re about to go H2O broke. But she’s also a leader of an emerging movement for water justice, one that is starting to score victories in the desperate fight to keep a thirsty planet slaked.” – Bill McKibben.
Co-sponsor: Elliot Bay Book Company
Information: (206) 624-6600
Attendance: 40 members of the Seattle community

16 April 2008 - Faculty Book Reading
&Now2008 - A Festival of Innovative Literature and Art, Chapman University, Orange, California
Canadian Studies Affiliated Faculty, and Professor in French, Denyse Delcourt, read from her recently published novel set in Québec. Her 2001 novel, Garielle au bois dormant, published in Montréal, has been published in the U.S. as Gabrielle and the Long Sleep into Mourning (Green Integer, translated by Eugene Vance). A finalist for both the Prix Anne-Hébert and the Prix Marguerite-Duras, this gemlike novel brings together eight childhood friends together decades later, all in a house by a lake in Québec. The death of one of them is a central point for the stories that get told, the mysteries that slowly come to light.
Attendance: 50 members of the Seattle community

Monday, 28 April 2008 - Film Screening
"Shake Hands with the Devil," (2008)
7 p.m., 120 Communication, UW campus
Canadian Lt. General Romeo Dallaire was the military commander of the UN mission in Rwanda and this movie is personal and, all too true, story of his experience during the genocide of 1994. Advance copy of the documentary courtesy of the Consul General of Canada. Viewers are invited to a discussion period after the film. This is part of a three-part Monday evening lecture series on conflict and U.S.-U.N. policy in Africa. The discussion will be lead by Canadian Studies Affiliated Faculty, Frederick Michael Lorenz JD, LLM, Senior Lecturer at the Jackson School, with first hand experience in Somalia and other UN peacekeeping operations around the globe. In 2000 he served as a United Nations legal affairs officer in Kosovo, working in the UN Civil Administration. He is also a Senior Peace Fellow with the Public International Law and Policy Group of Washington DC, with projects in Georgia, Armenia and the self-proclaimed Republic of Nagorny Karabakh.
Co-sponsor: Canadian Consulate, Seattle
Attendance: 14 UW students

Tuesday, 10 June 2008 – Film Screening - Early British Columbia "Documentary"
"Edward Curtis Meets the Kwakwaka’wakw, In the Land of the Head Hunters"
7 p.m., Moore Theatre, 1932 2nd Ave Seattle, WA
Curtis's landmark 1914 silent film of Pacific Northwest First Nations culture has been restored, re-evaluated, and framed with a live orchestral arrangement of the original score and a performance by the Gwa'wina Dancers, descendants of the indigenous cast. This collaborative project approaches the film from two distinct but overlapping perspectives: as a scholarly recovery and restoration of the original melodramatic contexts and content of the film and musical score; and as an indigenous re-framing of this material given unique Kwakwaka'wakw perspectives on the original film, its specific cultural content, and its historical context of production.
For a scholarly introduction to Curtis’s film and the central role of the Kwakwaka’wakw (Kwakiutl) in its production, please visit this site:http://www.curtisfilm.rutgers.edu
Co-sponsor: Burke Museum of Natural History
Attendance: 1,250 members of the Seattle community

Media Coverage

30 April 2008 - Newspaper Article
"New port in B.C. may pose threat: But timing of its debut isn't ideal," by Kristen Millares Young referring to a public lecture by Canadian Studies Affiliated Faculty member, Professor Anne Goodchild, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Readership: approximately 125,000

Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu