2005-06 Events Report

The following is a listing of all Center lectures, workshops, conferences, and other activities in the 2005-06 academic year.

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Thursday, 7 July 2005, Film Screening
6:30 pm, Burke Museum, UW Campus
Being Caribou
Description: In 2003 Karsten Heuer and Leanne Allison left the remote community of Old Crow, Yukon, to join the Porcupine Caribou Herd on their epic life journey. For five months the Canadians migrated on foot with the 123,00-member herd from wintering to calving grounds in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and back again - 1,000 miles across snow and tundra - across three mountain ranges, through icy rivers, and past wolves and hungry grizzlies. The film is a National Film Board production made from the footage Leanne shot on the 5-month experience.

Spectacular footage and intimate video diaries give a glimpse into a landscape and a way of being human that create a journey never before undertaken. The experience transforms the team leaving them to try and convey their story to Senators on Capitol Hill one short week after returning with the caribou to their winter range in the Central Yukon. Karsten and Leanne are still working to stop Congress from passing the final Act scheduled to be voted on this September.
Co-sponsor: Boeing Company, UW Canadian Studies Center, Burke Museum
Information: http://www.beingcaribou.com /
Attendance: 78 members of the university community and general public


15-25 July 2005 - Lecture Series - registration necessary
Maasdam Transatlantic Ship, St. Pierre and Miquelon, Greenland, Iceland
"Three-Part Lecture Series on Canada," by Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director, Canadian Studies Center

Description: "Sovereignty Movement in Québec: It's History and the Origins of St. Pierre and Miquelon." The sovereignty movement in Québec has roots that go back to the very founding of our two countries. Even today the Québec license plate reads, "Je me souviens" or "I remember." What are the Québecois remembering? And how is it that there is still a little piece of France in North America? This lecture will provide an overview of the history of the French in North America, the creation of Québec, and an overview of why it is that the Québecois wish to separate from Canada.

"The Inuit in Canada: Northern People/Northern Lands." The North and the Inuit have always held a fascination for those of us that do not live in the Arctic. This fascination stems back hundreds of years to when Europeans first came into contact with the Inuit in Greenland and later Canada. The history of "contact" is fascinating and has shaped the self-determination movements of the Inuit today. This lecture will give an overview of the Inuit as a people, the history of contact and how that shaped Inuit culture, and the innovative forms of governance that are being formed in the North today.

"Early Exploration in the North Atlantic." What if we were sailing east having no idea when and what we might "bump" into along the way? Imagine that each port we stop into is a place previously never seen or known. Imagine our anticipation! 500 years ago, Europeans had no idea that two continents lay west and indeed their travels were filled with anticipation, excitement, and surprise. This lecture will outline the history of exploration to the New World and how the voyages and discoveries of the explorers shaped our new nations from a Canadian perspective.

Co-sponsors: Holland America Line; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Registration: Participants must be passengers on the Maasdam Ship
Attendance: 1,350 passengers on Maasdam Ship


Thursday, 4 August 2005 - Lecture
6:30 pm, Burke Room, Burke Museum, UW Campus
The Earth's Blanket: A Metaphor for Sustaining Cultures and Habitats
by Nancy Turner
Description:
In this lecture, Nancy Turner will focus on the environmental knowledge and embedded belief systems of the Nlakapmx and other First Nations of Western Canada, particularly as this knowledge relates to plants and habitats. The information she presents is from her recent book, The Earth's Blanket: Traditional Teachings for Sustainable Living. Drawing on the teachings of indigenous Elders and other cultural specialists of British Columbia, Turner discusses the importance of place and of the interconnectedness of all the elements in our ecosystems, issues we all need to consider as we struggle to sustain ourselves and minimize our impact on the environment in the 21st Century.
Bio:
Nancy J. Turner is Distinguished Professor in the School of Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria, British Columbia. She is also a Research Associate with the Royal British Columbia Museum and the author or co-author of more than 15 books and numerous other publications. She is an elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and the Linnaean Society of London, and recipient of the Richard Evans Schultes Award in Ethnobotany from the Healing Forest Conservancy in Washington, D.C., the Order of British Columbia, and the Canadian Botanical Association's Lawson Medal for lifetime contributions to Canadian botany.
Co-sponsors: University of Washington Press; Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture
Information:
206-543-4050 University of Washington Press; or, 206-543-5590 Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture
Burke Museum, http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/; University of Washington Press / Earth's Blanket book web page http://www.washington.edu/uwpress/search/books/TUREAR.html
Attendance: 80 members of the university and Seattle community


15-19 August 2005 - Continuing Education
8:30 am - 2 pm daily, Shoreline Community College, Shoreline, WA
Summer College for Folks Over Fifty
Canada: From Atlantic to Pacific by Dr. Douglas Jackson, Former Director, Canadian Studies Center
Description:
Explore key elements in the development of our neighbor to the north, including the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway, the expansion of agriculture, and the growth of industries such as the Hudson's Bay Company. Now, the rapidly changing population dynamics of southern British Columbia are altering society in that province. Dr. Jackson will lecture on Canada daily at the Summer College for Folks over 50.
Sponsors:
Shoreline Community College, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Attendance:
150 seniors


17 August 2005 - Continuing Education
11-Noon, Shoreline Community College, Shoreline, WA
Summer College for Folks Over Fifty
Inuit Sovereignty Movements in Canada by Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director, Canadian Studies Center
Description:
This lecture will cover the history of sovereignty efforts by the Inuit of Canada and including how the Inuit are becoming increasingly active in the world.
Sponsors:
Shoreline Community College, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Attendance:
150 seniors


13-15 and 20-22 September 2005 - K-7 Student Education
Lockwood Elementary, Bothell WA
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) at Your School!
Description:
The RCMP made visits (on reservation) to schools in September to give their presentation entitled, "Just Say Neigh to Drugs," providing information on the history of the RCMP and the Musical Ride.
Co-sponsors:
Royal Canadian Mounted Police; Canadian Consulate, Seattle; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information:
canada@u.washington.edu.
Attendance: 60 Lockwood Elementary 6th graders


21 September 2005 - Faculty Development Workshop
9 am-12 pm, Consulate General of Canada, Denver, Colorado
Canada in the Classroom

Description:
This workshop was tailored to the specific interests of the participants - including political science, voice and music, security studies, and history - and was carried out in a hands-on, interactive manner. In addition to providing information about the experience of Canadian Studies programs around the country, Dr. Kirkey provided information on professional associations and grant opportunities. Participants demonstrated strong interest in the many resources and tools available to support and encourage Canadian Studies or Canada as a comparative focus to their various course offerings or activities.
Bio:
Dr. Chris Kirkey, Councilor and Director, Association for Canadian Studies in the United States, Center for the Study of Canada at Plattsburgh State University of NY, assisted by Dr. George Sulzner, President of the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States, led the workshop with faculty and administrators from the University of Colorado, Colorado State University, the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado College, the Colorado School of Mines and the University of Wyoming.
Co-sponsors:
Foreign Affairs Canada, the International Education and Youth Division, University of Washington, Western Washington University, University of Maine, University of Vermont, Plattsburgh State University.
Workshop Summary:
Advocacy Report
Attendance:
20 Colorado faculty


22 September 2005 - K-12 Educator Professional Development
9 am-12 pm, Consulate General of Canada, Denver, Colorado
Canada in the Classroom:
A Curriculum Development K-12 Workshop, by Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director, UW Canadian Studies Center
Description:
This workshop was geared for K-12 teachers, curriculum specialists, and administrators and featured a rich variety of curriculum development materials focused on Canada, including current pedagogical approaches to curriculum instruction on Canada, the latest in lesson plans for classroom instruction, a review of national resources to assist educators in introducing Canada in the classroom, and resource contacts.
This presentation, accessible below, includes an introduction to Canadian Studies in the U.S., addresses the question why Teach in Canada?, and provides an overview of the Linking Modules - Connecting Canadian History to the U.S."
Text to accompany power point:  Canada in the Classroom
Co-sponsors: The Association for Canadian Studies in the US, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Attendance:
20 Colorado K-12 educators


16 October 2005 - Lecture
Vancouver, British Columbia
University of Washington Retirement Association Fall Festival 2005
Canadian Values and Politics
by Studies< international of School Jackson M. Henry Center, Studies Canadian Affairs; Marine UW Seatte; Consulate,> Dr. Douglas Jackson, Professor Emeritus, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Founder, Canadian Studies Center
Description:
Dr. Jackson and Mr. Siksay will discuss current politics in British Columbia and compare Canadian to U.S. values. This lecture is part of a 3-day UW Retirement Association trip to Vancouver, British Columbia. Please note that pre-registration is necessary and that there is a fee. Contact UW Retirement Association below.
Sponsors: UW Retirement Association; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information/Registration: UW Retirement Association 206-543-8600 or retiremt@u.washington.edu, Click here to register: Registration Form
Attendance: 50 seniors


12-14 November 2005 - Academic Conference - $50 ($30 students/low income)
University of Washington
Journey to Understanding: Indian Child Welfare and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - Cross-Border Experiences - A Mutual Learning Circle
Description:
With Dr. Kieran O'Malley, Assistant Professor, presenting on FASD. This interactive mutual learning experience is aimed at social work students, youth, educators (community and university based) to provide a forum for talking about two important issues that many, if not all social workers in the US and Canada, will encounter in their careers: Indian Child Welfare and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. In both the US and Canada, while these two areas of concern have impacted First Nations communities disproportionately, they have also generated unique and creative strengths based community approaches to practice and healing providing invaluable lessons for social workers and community organizers in the wider communities.
Dr. O'Malley presented a paper "Transgenerational medical and psychiatric issues in Aborginal /First Nations populations in Canada and the USA." He also participated with Carolyn Hartness in joint teaching sessions focused on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in the Native American/First Nations populations and the role of the social worker in management and advocacy. The conference was in Daybreak Center Sat. and Sun. and was opened by Daniel Hart the new Director of  UW Canadian Studies. Michael Yellow Bird from Kansas was one of the Keynote Speakers. On Monday the conference was at the UW Friends Center in the University District. All days were well attended with a male and female sweat on Saturday, and daily feasts with drumming, dancing , aborginal movies, and large and small talking circles.
Faculty Chairs: Stan de Mello and Gino Aisenberg, Social Work
Co-sponsors:
UW School of Social Work; Chief Seattle Club; University of British Columbia School of Social Work; Kumut Lelum Children and Family Services, Ladysmith, British Columbia; Templeton High School, Vancouver, BC; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information/Registration:
Please contact Victoria Johnson (206-285-4425) or Lorraine Brave (206-352-2304) at United Indian Tribes. Please note that registration includes meals and educational materials.
Attendance: Over 100 participants from Seattle and BC attended this successful conference


16-20 November 2005 - Academic Conference
St. Louis, Missouri
Association for Canadian Studies in the US 18th Biennial Conference
Chairs:
Diddy Hitchins, University of Alaska Anchorage; Doug Nord, Wright State University
Description: Founded in 1971, the Association for Canadian Studies in the US (ACSUS) is an academic association of scholars promoting greater understanding and awareness of Canada-US relations through the study of Canada in the US. The biennial conference has evolved into the largest gathering in the world of leading scholars and practitioners focused on Canada and Canada-US relations. University of Washington presentations include Dan Hart, Kate Dunsmore, Timothy Pasch and Natalie Debray.
Co-sponsors: ACSUS; Government of Canada; Quebec Government; 15 universities in the Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information: http://www.acsus.org or info@acsus.org
Attendance: 250 academies & graduate students


18-19 November 2005 - Academic Symposium - free of charge
St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia
Health Symposium: Operationalizing Population Health: How can UWSPHCM and UBC Work Together to Create a Common Research Agenda?
Description: To increase collaboration across the border, between the two schools; to develop a common research agenda for teaching and areas for future research; to allow faculty, staff and students from the two schools to create professional relationships and connections; and, to explore ways to create a population research laboratory across borders.
Agenda:
Friday, November 18th, 2:00-5:00 pm:
Opening speakers: Dean Patricia Wahl, Dean, UW School of Public Health and Community Medicine; Martin Schechter, UBC
Panel Discussion: Similar Geography, Different Health Care Systems, and Different Health Outcomes: Exploring Potential Partnerships and Collaborations.
Saturday, November 19th, 9:00am-12:00pm:
Breakout Sessions: HIV/Infectious disease; Population Health; Health services research; Global Health; Indigenous health practices; Maternal and Child Health
Co-sponsors: UW School of Public Health and Community Medicine; University of British Columbia Department of Health Care & Epidemiology; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington
Faculty Chair: Jack Thompson, UW School of Public Health and Community Medicine/Affiliated Canadian Studies Faculty
Information/Registration: For more information, please contact Jack Thompson or Deb Hinchey: Phone 206-685-1130
E-mail: jackt@u.washington.edu or hinchd@u.washington.edu
Attendance: 60 graduate students and faculty


19 January 2006 – Educator Professional Training
Session 1: 8-11 a.m.; Session 2: Noon-3 p.m., Jefferson County School District, Colorado
“Teaching Canada in the Classroom”

     

Left Photo: "Canada in the Classroom" presenters from left: Inta Morris, Canadian Consulate, Denver; Judy Hansen, Jefferson Country School District, Michael Cawthra, Red Rocks Elementary; Jamie Caton, Canadian Consulate, Denver; Nadine Fabbi, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington
Right Photo: Michael Cawthra, Red Rocks Elementary, Colorado, provides an entertaining reading of Roch Carrier's, "The Hockey Sweater."
Description: The Denver School District is mandated to teach Canada in the Sixth Grade. To meet the professional development requirements of educators in Colorado, the Canadian Studies Center worked in conjunction with the Jefferson Country School District, the Canadian Consulate, Denver and the Association for Canadian Studies in the U.S. to deliver this training. The program included an introduction by Judy Hansen and Brian Loney, Jefferson County Schools; “Canada 101: Geography, History, Economic and Government” by Inta Morris, Consulate General of Canada in Denver; and an “Introduction to Canada and Canadian Studies in the U.S.,” to “Linking: Connecting Canadian History to the U.S.” modules, and an overview of the “Top Ten Reference Sites” and “Top Five Resources” for the study of Canada by Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director, UW Canadian Studies Center.
Curriculum Materials: Educators were provided with extensive curriculum materials including the “Introduction to Canadian Studies” binder of resources provided by the U.W. Canadian Studies Center. For a copy of Nadine’s power point presentation, “Canadian Studies in the U.S. and Why Study Canada?” click here (available soon).
Sponsors: Jefferson County School District, Colorado; Consulate General of Canada, Denver; Association for Canadian Studies in the U.S.; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Attendance: 100 Sixth Grade educators


9 February 2006 – Roundtable Discussion – RSVP Required
8-10 a.m., University Club, UW Campus
“Canada's New Strategic Partnership with China and its Implications,” by Dr. Wenran Jiang, University of Alberta, Edmonton
 


University of Alberta professor Wenran Jiang and his wife Tanya Casperson with their sons Hadrian, 9, and Tristan, 5. Photo: CP (Sean Conner)
Biography: Dr. Wenran Jiang is twice a Japan Foundation Fellow, an academic member of Foreign Affairs Canada's Strategic Working Group on China and a senior fellow with the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada. He has organized two large Canada-China energy conferences in the past year, and is the editor of the forthcoming book, Fueling the Dragon: China's Energy Demand and its Implications for Canada.
Description: Breakfast will begin at 8 a.m. and will be followed by Dr. Jiang presentation. The presentation will address the following: Chinese President Hu Jintao visited Canada last September to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the establishment of Canada-China diplomatic relations, and the two countries upgraded their relationship from a "cooperative partnership" to a "strategic partnership." Energy has featured heavily in recent bilateral exchanges with large Chinese energy firms investing in Canada and purchasing Canadian-owned overseas assets. The talk will look at these developments and their implications for the United States.
Information: Those attending will be asked to prepare for the discussion by reading the following suggested articles by Dr. Jiang:
Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, Canada in Asia Series
“Fueling the Dragon: China's Quest for Energy Security and Canada's Opportunities,” by Wenran Jiang, May, 2005
Jiang’s articles published in the China Brief from the Jamestown Foundation in Washington, DC

Jiang’s other works and extensive media activities at his personal Blog: http://wenran.blogspot.com/
Sponsors: Canadian Consulate, Seattle; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; China Studies Program, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information/Registration: Seating is limited. To reserve a seat contact Marion Cook, Program Assistant, Canadian Studies Center at 206-221-6374 or canada@u.washington.edu.
Attendance: 20 members of the UW and Seattle community
Media: Seattle Times article covers visit - "Energy reshapes China's priorities", over 1 million reached in region
Business Week Opinion Piece by Wenran Jiang


23 February 2006 - Lecture
University Unitarian Humanists, Seattle
In Search of a Canadian Definition by Douglas Jackson, Ph.D.
Description: What is it that makes a citizen of Canada a Canadian? What unique circumstances influence the lives and attitudes of our neighbors to the North? Douglas Jackson, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of University of Washington, who hails from Canada, will discuss his thoughts on this topic. He recently retired after teaching courses in international affairs, history and geography among others for many years.
Co-sponsors: Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Attendance: 45 seniors


25 February 2006 -  Academic Conference/Symposium
8:30AM-3:30PM, Thomson Hall, UW Seattle Campus
Storytelling, Puppetry and Masks from around the World Mosaic
Description: The Jackson School Outreach Centers have teamed up once again to offer an action packed day of storytelling and puppetry presentations as well as fun, hands-on sessions that will leave teachers brimming with ideas to take back to the classroom. Professor and Puppeteer Kathy Foley, will kick off the program with a lecture workshop on Indonesian Puppet theater. Following the keynote, participants will select from a series of break-out sessions that explore storytelling traditions, puppetry and puppet-making crafts from various world regions.
Registration: Registration required before Feb 23rd. Registration Fee is $45 and includes: seven free clock hours, an ethnic lunch, and a collection of handouts and lesson plans.
More Information: Mosaics Saturday workshops introduce teachers of elementary and middle school students to new ideas, resources, and activities for teaching about the world beyond our borders. The workshops offer an array of sessions to chose from. . **Pre- So shake off your winter blues and join us for an exciting day guaranteed to inspire.
Bio: Kathy Foley is a Professor of Theatre at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She trained in mask and puppetry in the Sundanese region of Indonesia and was the first non-Indonesian invited to perform in the prestigious all Indonesia National Wayang Festival. As an actress her performance of SHATTERING THE SILENCE: BLAVATSKY, BESANT, RUUKMINI DEVI will tour the U.S. and England in 2005. She performs frequently in the US and Indonesia and has curated exhibitions of Puppets South and Southeast Asia and Masks for Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta, the East-West Center in Hawaii, Northern Illinois University, Guilford College, The Frick Art Gallery in Pittsburgh and other institutions. She is author of the Southeast Asia section of CAMBRIDGE GUIDE TO WORLD THEATRE and editor of ASIAN THEATRE JOURNAL and her articles have appeared in TDR, MODERN DRAMA, ASIAN THEATRE JOURNAL, PUPPETRY INTERNATIONAL and other publications. She is currently researching typology and cosmology in Southeast Asian theatre with recent fieldwork in Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Burma and Indonesia. She is also a Punch and Judy professor.
Break-out Sessions Include:
* Do-it-yourself Turkish Shadow Puppetry
* The Northwest Puppet Center
* The Manas – a Central Asian epic poem – longer than the Iliad and Odyssey combined!
* The Ramayana Epic
* Indonesian and Indian Puppet-making lessons
* Chinese Shadow Puppets, Stories and Characters
* Stories of Ghana
Information: For more information, contact: tikka@u.washington.edu or call 206-543-9606
Attendance: 55 registered


Winter Quarter 2006 - Continuing Education Course

January 25-February 15, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Shoreline Community College
The Formation of Canada: 1763 to the Present," by Professor Emeritus Douglas Jackson, University of Washington



Canadian veterans from the Gordon First Nation north of Regina, Sask., Canada (Source: CP)
Description: The course examined the major stages in the creation of a Canadian identity and nationality, including the American War of Independence and the War of 1812. Other influences examined were the British 19th century mercantile policy and free trade, the United States Civil War, the Canadian Pacific Railway and the West, the Great War and the relationship with the United States. Canadian by birth, with a Ph.D. from Maryland, Dr. Jackson has been a faculty member at the University of Washington since 1955. He is the founder of the Canadian Studies Center there.
Co-sponsors: Creative Retirement Institute, Edmonds Community College; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington.
Attendance: 48 seniors

1 March 2006 - Roundtable Discussion
Noon-1:30, University Club, UW Campus
Faculty/Graduate Student Luncheon with Lance Berelowitz

Description: The Canadian Consulate, Seattle and the Canadian Studies Center sponsored a luncheon and roundtable discussion lead by international port and urban planner, Lance Berelowitz and author of “City of Dreams: Vancouver and the Global Imagination.” Mr. Berelowitz provided about 20 minutes of comments on Vancouver as the future site of the 2010 Olympics and the future impact on city/port development followed by a roundtable discussion with all guests. Given the diverse backgrounds of attendees – Marine Affairs, Urban Planning, Vancouver-philes, Olympic fans – it was an interesting dialogue. In preparation for the discussion, luncheon participants read an article by Mr. Berelowitz attached and entitled, “Creating the Cultural City: Leveraging Vancouver’s 2010 Olympic Winter Games.”
Attendees: 22 faculty, grad students, city/government reps  [Berelowitz Luncheon List]


1 March 2006 – Lecture
2:30-3:30 p.m., UW Campus
“Urban Waterfront Planning in Nakhodka (Russia) and Vancouver (Canada): A Study in Contrasts,” by Lance Berelowitz, Urban Planner, Vancouver
Presenter: Mietka Zieba, Senior Trade Consultant, Russian Market Canada Mortgage, Calgary. 
Description: Commuting between Canada's West Coast gateway (Vancouver) and Russia's Far East portal (Nakhodka) is an experience of extreme contrasts. Both cities have grown up around highly developed, outward looking, international ports. Both cities are vital to their respective country's maritime trade. And both are Pacific Rim gateways, through which passes a king's ransom of goods and natural resources. 
But there the comparisons end. Whereas Vancouver has recently embraced its urban waterfront with a vengeance, Nakhodka is still profoundly disconnected from its waterfront in many ways. While in Vancouver the urban waterfront is now its most prized, highly valued real estate, Nakhodka's is still almost exclusively given over to heavy industrial uses, many of which are clearly obsolescent. The two cities present a study in urban planning contrasts. Yet Nakhodka (population 180,000), with the right political will and civic leadership, could become the Vancouver of the Russian Far East. Many of the ingredients for urban waterfront revitalization are already there. It is not too hard to imagine.
Come join international urban planning consultant Lance Berelowitz--who is working in both Russia and Canada--as he takes us on a journey of comparisons and contrasts between these two maritime cities on opposite sides of the Pacific Rim.
Biography: [ Link to Lance's biography ] [ Lance's event flyer ]
Sponsors: Canadian Consulate, Seattle; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies ; Henry Art Gallery.
Registration: If you are interested in attending, please contact the course instructor, Vlad Kaczynski at  vkaczynski@msn.com.
Attendance: 25 students, faculty


1 March 2006 – Lecture
7:30 PM, Henry Art Gallery Auditorium, UW Campus (followed by book signing and reception in the Baci Cafe)
“Dream City: Vancouver and the Global Imagination - Urban Planning Lessons From North of the Border,” by Lance Berelowitz, International Urban Planner, Vancouver

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies
Description: In recent years, Vancouver has emerged as the poster child of urbanism in North America. Through a series of locally grown strategies, Vancouver has consciously willed itself into becoming a model of contemporary city-making. Like the most vivid dreams, the city is reinventing itself: something curious, perhaps even miraculous, is happening here. The visitors come in steady droves, and go away suitably impressed. Barely a month goes by without yet another magazine article or news report praising Vancouver's urban virtues. And it is easy to be impressed by the obvious: the city's spectacular setting, the intimate and apparently happy cohabitation of wild nature and built fabric, the tightly packed gleaming new condo towers downtown, the public waterfront, the vibrant neighbourhood 'High Streets', the neat parks and lush, tree-lined suburban streets. The place seems to work.
But is the attention deserved, and how did Vancouver get here? And how much of Vancouver's experience is applicable to other--and in particular American--cities? Why are places as diverse as Shanghai, San Francisco and San Diego now hiring Vancouver architects and planners to fix their cities? In short, what are the keys to understanding Vancouver's unique sense of place, and its relevance to the rest of the world?
Come hear author and international urban commentator Lance Berelowitz explore some of the key themes from his award-winning new book on Vancouver's emerging urban form and their relevance to Seattle."
Biography: Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies[ Link to Lance's biography ] [ Lance's event flyer ]
Sponsors: Canadian Consulate, Seattle; UW School of Marine Affairs; UW Department of Urban Design and Planning; University Book Store; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information: Directions to the Henry Art Gallery. For additional questions, please email us: canada@u.washington.edu
Attendance: 90 university/community members
Media: Front Page Article in the UW Daily ( 2 March 06, 20k circulation)


Friday, 3 March 2006 – Washington State High Schools Student Language Training - $13 per student/$30 per school
8:45 – 2:30, UW Campus
World Languages Day
Description: Today's high school juniors and seniors have the opportunity and the challenge of living in a world whose boundaries are becoming smaller and smaller. It is more and more essential, as well as mind-opening, to learn other languages and to become familiar with the cultures of our world. World Languages Day offeres students the opportunity to visit classes in many different languages; sample a variety of cultures; attend presentations and activities on a wide variety of cultural topics; learn about careers using world languages; and, tour the UW campus and visit the Language Learning Center.
Canadian Language Presentations:

Language, Media, and Cultural Identity, A View from Québec by Natalie Debray, Communications. Language is a major factor in cultural identity. Protecting the French language is one of the key concerns of Québec society. As a small Francophone community, Québec has had to fight for centuries to preserve its language and way of life. In this era of globalization, the mass media have been both a challenge and a positive tool. In this talk students will gain a historical overview of the language issues, as well as discuss some of the methods Quebec has implemented to both protect and promote its culture in a mass mediated society.
Attendance: 15 high school students

Language and Culture in the Canadian Province of Québec by Douglas Jackson, Canadian Studies Center. Québec is the only province with an official language in the arts and business; namely French! This session will provide an historical overview of Québec from the British take over in 1759, to the 1960s when the Liberal government under Premier Jean Lesage sought to introduce cultural changes in Québec, through to the present day. Come learn about this Quiet Revolution that has given the young people opportunities for a broader education and made language the key to the culture of Québekers or the Québecois!
Attendance: 20 high school students

Inuktitut – the Inuit Language by Tim Pasch, Communication, Foreign Language and Area Studies Recipient in Inuktitut, 2005-06.
Attendance: 15 high school students

Salish/Lushootseed Language by Jeanette Bushnell, Women’s Studies.
Over twenty years ago, Skagit historian, linguist and elder, Vi Hilbert, ended her teaching career at UW and, until Autumn 2005, Lushootseed, the language spoken by local indigene, was not taught here. As an entering PhD student in 1999, Bushnell wished to study Lushootseed as her 'foreign' language. Several undergraduates have also requested that Lushootseed be available at the UW. Last year, the American Indian Studies Program and Tulalip Tribes agreed to offer three quarters of Lushootseed as a trail offering. The two groups are in the process of working out the program but have successfully completed one quarter that was co-taught with a Tulalip Lushootseed speaker and Bushnell. This presentation will discuss the rewards and challenges of languages offered jointly by native nations and universities.
Attendance: 15 high school students
Co-sponsors: UW Extension; Outreach Centers, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Registration: World Languages Day 2006 is filled to capacity. From more information contact UW Extension, 206-897-8939 or 1-800-506-1325.


Wednesday, March 15 - Book Reading -No Charge, Open to the Public
Canadian Poet Jane Urquhart
7:30 p.m. , Elliott Bay Bookstore Cafe, Downtown Seattle

Description: We are honored to present one of North America’s most eminent writers here, in this visit by novelist Jane Urquhart. She is here from her home in Ontario to read from her extraordinary, sixth novel, A Map of Glass (MacAdam/Cage). This multilayered novel, set both in contemporary Toronto and in 19th century rural Ontario, begins as a disoriented man freezes to death and his widow travels to meet the man who discovered her late husband’s body. “Urquhart’s passion for the past and the land are at full poetic play in this intricate story of love, loss and memory.” – Publishers Weekly. Ms. Urquhart’s novel, The Underpainter, received the Governor General’s Award, one of Canada’s highest literary honors.

Co-sponsors: Canadian Consulate; Canadian Studies Center, Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington.
Information: Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies Directions to Elliott Bay Bookstore. Click here for a biography of Canadian poet Jane Urquhart.
Attendance: 35 community members

 Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies


Friday, March 17 -  Book Reading - No Charge, Open to the Public
Dede Crane and Bill Gaston
7:30 p.m., Elliott Bay Bookstore Cafe Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson international Studies, Downtown Seattle     

    
Bill Gaston and Dede Crane
(Courtesy of Carolyn Swayze Literary Agency)

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies

Description: Down and over from their Victoria home for this joint reading are highly regarded fiction writers Dede Crane and Bill Gaston. She is here with her debut novel, Sympathy (Raincoast) and he, a previous Giller Prize nominee and Timothy Findley Award winner, is here with his newest novel, Sointula (Raincoast). “Beneath Sympathy’s smooth, deceptively quiet prose and light touch, lie depths of pity and mercy and grace. In this intricate, tender ballet, Crane’s wounded characters reconnect with themselves and each other, reintegrating mind and heart through the unfailing intelligence of the body.” – Pauline Holdstock. Sointula is a woman’s quest to revisit her past in the form of seeing a long-ago lover, and to find her lost son in a remote Vancouver Island village. “Gaston’s compassionate and vibrant grasp of the human comedy, his philosophical depth and technical skill, remind me of the best work of Guy Vanderheage and David Malouf.” – The Toronto Star.

Co-sponsors: Canadian Consulate; Canadian Studies Center, Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington.
Information: Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies Directions to Elliott Bay Bookstore. Click here for a biography of Bill Gaston. Click here for a biography of Dede Crane.Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies Attendance: 20 community membersCanadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies

 


Monday and Wednesday, 27-29 March 2006 – Continuing Education Course - $49
9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Shoreline Community College
Wintercollege for Folks Over Fifty
Description: Sow the seeds for some new ideas to blossom by attending Witnercollege this spring. Meet old friends and make new ones as you expand your horizons in topics such as “The Authors of the U.S.,” “Canadian Values,” “International Relations,” “The Art of Ancient Rome,” “Language and Politics,” “Internet Research,” and more.
Canadian Lecture Series РCanadian Values: Professor Emeritus, Douglas Jackson, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, U.W. will address the growing differences in Canada-U.S. values. Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau once said that the head of state had no place in the bedrooms of the nation. What was the Quiet Revolution in Qu̩bec? Hear how the foundations and philosophies that governed the development of Canada are steering the country in directions that stand in contrast to social developments in the U.S. Dr. Douglas Jackson founded the U.W. Canadian Studies Center and speaks widely on Canada. The Canadian Series will be held daily from 10:30-11:45.
Co-sponsors: Shoreline Community College; Jackson School of International Studies; Third Place Books; Honey Bear Bakery; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information/Registration: Shoreline Community College Extended Learning, (206) 533-6700
Attendance: 28 members of the community


Friday, 7 April 2006 – Graduate Student Conference
9 a.m. - 4 p.m., Walker-Ames Room, Kane Hall, UW Campus
The 5th Annual Showcase of Native American & Alaskan Native Scholars - "Transcending Boundaries: Implications of Indigenous Graduate Research”



Description: Native Americans Students in Advanced Academia (NASAA) at the University of Washington was created to bring together graduate and professional students of Native American, First Nations, and Alaskan Native descent as well as our other indigenous relatives. Their goal is to increase awareness of the diversity and excellence of the ongoing research, work and achievements of these students, and to provide a forum for them socialize, network and disseminate information. Canadian Studies is playing an increased role in promoting and supporting Canadian aboriginal voices/research into the program.
Canadian Presentations: Two Canadian academics served as the keynote speakers for the conference. Dr. Jo-ann Archibald, Associate Professor and Director, First Nations Longhouse of Learning, University of British Columbia, provided a background on First Nations women in Canada who have contributed to aboriginal research and education. Archibald is a visionary, lecturer and author from the Stolo Nation, B.C. Dr. Neal McLeod, Assistant Professor, Indigenous Studies, First Nations University of Canada, Regina, provided a keynote entitled, Personifying the Challenge of Boundaries.” McLeod spoke about how his scholarly writing, poetry, and painting challenge mainstream definitions of scholarship in academic institutions, and how his research works towards indigenizing the academy.
Co-sponsors: Native American Students in Advanced Academia; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information/Registration: http://students.washington.edu/nasaauw/
Additional Information: Click here for a copy of the program flyer
Attendance: 50 graduate students, faculty and members of the general public


Saturday 8 April 2006 – Film Screenings
7:30 p.m., Ethnic Cultural Center, UW Campus
An Evening of Canadian First Nations and Inuit Films – Qallunuajatut and When Two Worlds Collide



Description: Two recent Canadian aboriginal films will be featured with the directors available for questions following. Qallunuajatut (Urban Inuk), directed by Jobie Weetaluktuk, concerns Inuit life in Montréal. When Two Worlds Collide, written and directed by Tasha Hubbard, follows the painful story of Saskatoon’s “freezing deaths” in the Cree community and the controversy surrounding this issue. Evening of Canadian First Nations and Inuit Films is part of the Fifth Annual Native Voices Film Festival.
Additional Information:
Flyer for Film Festival: Front & Back
When Two Worlds Collide – information from the National Film Board
Co-sponsors: Native Voices Program; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Attendance: 150 members of the community

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies


Monday, 10 April 2006 - Lecture
Lifetime Learning Center, Seattle
Canadian Values, by Douglas Jackson, Professor, Professor Emeritus Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Description: Lifetime Learning Center offers daytime, non-credit college-level courses in a wide range of subjects, from literature, history, and opera appreciation to bridge, yoga, and tai chi (geared to older adults), watercolor, quilting, computer classes, and writing your life story. This lecture will focus on Canada today and the Canada-U.S. relationship including current issues between the countries and how those issues are related to value differences.
Co-sponsors: Lifetime Learning Center; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information: http://www.lifetimelearningseattle.com
Attendance: 28 members of the community

Canadian Consulate, Seattle; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies


14-16 April 2006 – First Nations Pow-Wow
UW Campus
First Nations @ UW 35th Annual Pow-Wow

 

Description: Out of 400+ student groups on campus, First Nations @ UW distinguishes itself by organizing one of the largest student-run events on campus. The FN @ UW Annual Spring Powwow combines two things most important to each of us—education and culture. We are proud to welcome our family and friends to the UW campus every spring.
Canadian Guest: The Pow-wow will be featuring the Canadian drumming group, Red Bull, at this year’s Pow-wow. This world-class singing and drumming group was formed in 1987, with most members originating from the Little Pine Cree Nation near North Battleford, Saskatchewan. The Red Bull Singers is mainly made up of family members where the tradition is handed down from their families including their parents. The group's first performance was in Regina, Saskatchewan at the 1987 Saskatchewan Indian Federated College Pow-wow. Because the group was well received this led to performances in many places in the USA including Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New Mexico and Oklahoma. As their popularity grew they were invited as host drum for numerous pow-wows across North America. In 1994 highlights added to their career have been an overseas tour to the Goodwill Games in Russia, Poland, Finland and Sweden. In 1995 The Red Bull Singers had the honour of performing with World renowned artist Buffy Sainte-Marie on a song composed by Edmond Bull and Buffy Sainte-Marie entitled "Darling Don't Cry". This has led to an appearance on the Rita McNeil Show as well as a music video and a Buffy Sainte-Marie special. This year the group also won the World Hand Drum competition in Connecticut. The Red Bull Singers are recognized by many as being one of the most accomplished Pow-wow and Round Dance groups in North America.
Co-sponsors: UW Office of Minority Affairs; Associated Students of UW; Tulalip Tribe; UW American Indian Studies; UW American Indian Student Commission; Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs; Alumni and Multicultural Alumni Association; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies.
Addditional Information: First Nations at the UW website: http://students.washington.edu/fnuw/
Attendance: 4,000 community members

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies


Friday, 28 April 2006 – Grad Professional Development
9:30 a.m., Burke Museum Café, UW Campus
International Visitor Leadership Program Visit by Mr. Stephen Laskowski, Assistant Vice President, Ontario Trucking Association, Canada



Description: Canada is the United States' largest trading partner, with a large portion of that trade delivered by trucks across the northern US border. Mr. Stephen Laskowski represents the Ontario Trucking Association, founded in 1926 and the largest trucking association in Canada. He is here to address increased security measures and the impact on trucking/trade; environmental concerns in trucking; and the role of the federal and state governments in transportation infrastructure and funding. This meeting will be facilitated by Canadian Studies Center affiliated faculty and Director of the Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies Director, Greg Shelton.
Co-sponsors: World Affairs Council, Seattle; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information/Registration: Marion Cook, Program Assistant, Canadian Studies Center, (206) 221-6374 or canada@u.washington.edu


27-29 April 2006 - Academic Conference/SymposiumCanadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies - Registration
Madison, WisconsinCanadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies
Title VI and Fulbright-Hays National Outreach Conference

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Description: To address the vital need for greater inclusion of world area studies in US institutions, the Title VI and Fulbright-Hays National Outreach Conference will be held in Madison, Wisconsin, April 27-29, 2006. This conference is a resource for anyone involved with international educational outreach. The panels and presentations at this event will help to strengthen the capability and performance of American education in world area, international, and global studies. Successful outreach models and best practices from all over the US will be presented and discussed. Focused workshops will also be held on specific topics relevant to education and outreach. This conference is intended for both outreach professionals from institutions of higher education and practicing K-12 education professionals. This mingling of outreach experts and education practitioners will create a dynamic environment for the discussion of ideas. Edited proceedings of the conference will be published in order to assist outreach professionals in the future. Additional information and registration instructions are available at
http://wioc.wisc.edu/t6-2006/.

Canadian panels:

  • "Collaborative Best Practices Approaches to K-12 Outreach."
  • "Internationalize Your Curriculum - Globalize Student Perspectives - Teach Beyond the 49th Parallel," by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American
    Studies, Western Washington University
  • "Model K-12 Collaboration with an International Academic Association - Association for Canadian Studies in the U.S.," by Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington. Click here for a draft copy of the paper.
  • "Model K-12 Collaboration with an International Academic Association - American Council for Québec Studies," by Raymond Pelletier, Associate Director, Canadian-American Center, University of Maine
  • "Model Collaborations with a Geographic Alliance," by Betsy Arntzen, Education Outreach Coordinator, University of Maine

Attendance: 45 professional outreach staff

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies


Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Wednesday, 10 May 2006 – Roundtable – pre-registration necessary
10:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Colleen Room (Piano Room), University (Faculty) Club, UW Campus
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International Studies Roundtable on the Environment: Canada, the United States and the Challenges of Climate Change



Description: As part of a tri-institutional research and education linkage (UW, Western Washington University and University of British Columbia), the University of Washington is sponsoring two back-to-back roundtable discussions on Canada-U.S. relations regarding environmental issues. “Sovereignty on Thin Ice: Canada, the United States, and the Northwest Passage” will be presented by Michael Byers, Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law at the University of British Columbia, andCanadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International StudiesThe Struggle of Ideas and Self-Interest: Canada’s Ratification and Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol,” Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International Studies Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International Studies by Kathryn Harrison, Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International Studies Associate Professor of Political Science at the Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International Studies Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International Studies University of British Columbia Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International Studies (See below for more information.)
Co-sponsors: UW Program on the Environment; Center for International Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Information/Registration: Seating is limited and pre-registration is necessary. If you are interested in attending please contact the Canadian Studies Center program assistant, Marion Cook, to reserve a space (206) 221-6374 or canada@u.washington.edu.
Attendance: 30 undergrads, grads, faculty, community members

10 May 2006 PROGRAM:

10:30-11:45—Sovereignty on Thin Ice: Canada, the United States and the Northwest Passage by Michael Byers
Melting ice is opening up the Northwest Passage and reviving a dispute between the United States and Canada over who controls the potentially lucrative shipping route. The United States calls the passage an international strait, open to all. Canada claims control because it considers the passage an internal waterway, like the Mississippi River. Until recently, the decades-long dispute has been mostly academic; thick sea ice blocks the passage for about 11 months of the year. But as global temperatures rise and polar ice caps melt, the ice-free season may lengthen, making the Northwest Passage a viable shipping route within decades or, the U.S. Navy says, even a few years.

Michael Byers holds the Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law at the University of British Columbia. Prior to 2005, he was a Professor of Law and Director of Canadian Studies at Duke University; from 1996-1999 he was a Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford. Professor Byers writes and teaches on issues of military force, the laws of war, international human rights, the law of the sea, and Canada-US relations. He is the author of War Law: Understanding International Law and Armed Conflict (New York: Grove/Atlantic, 2006).

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International Studies 11:45-1—Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International StudiesThe Struggle of Ideas and Self-Interest: Canada’s Ratification and Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson International Studies by Kathryn Harrison

When the Canadian federal government ratified the Kyoto Protocol in 2002, despite the withdrawal of Canada’s largest trading partner, the United States, it did so n the face of strong opposition from both the business community and the Canadian provinces.  Canada’s decision to ratify Kyoto thus represented a triumph of commitments both to environmental sustainability and multilateralism over economic interests and political institutions. However, the Conservative government, elected in January 2006, has acknowledged that Canada will not comply with Kyoto, and begun quietly dismantling climate change programs put in place by their predecessors. While Canada’s surprising resolve thus has been undercut by traditional power politics, it remains to be seen whether the ideational commitment to Kyoto will be rendered entirely symbolic, or whether Canada’s continued participation in the Kyoto process will place it on a path for greater action than it might otherwise have taken.

Kathryn Harrison is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the > University of British Columbia where she has been a member of the faculty since 1993. Prior to that, she taught at the University of Washington and worked as a policy analyst for both Environment Canada and the United States Congress. Most recently, Dr. Harrison edited Racing to the Bottom? Provincial Interdependence in the Canadian Federation (Vancouver: UBC Press, 2005). She is currently directing a collaborative project comparing various jurisdictions’ responses to climate change.

Readings:
1. “As Polar Ice Turns to Water, Dreams of Treasure Abound,” Arctic Net, http://www.arcticnet-ulaval.ca/index.php?fa=News.showNews&home=4&menu=55&sub=1&id=89
2. “As Ice Melts, Debate over the  Northwest Passage Heats,” USA Today, http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2006-04-03-nwpassage-debate_x.htm
3. “The Need to Defend our New Northwest Passage,” The Tyee, http://thetyee.ca/Views/2006/01/30/DefendNorthwestPassage/
4."The Struggle of Ideas and Self-Interest: Canada’s Ratification and Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol,” by Kathryn Harrison (see attached)


Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

11 May 2006 - Lecture – RSVP requested Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies 3:00 p.m., University of Washington Faculty Club (Conference Room)Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Ambivalence About the "M" Word: Multiculturalism in New Times and Globalized Circumstances by Handel K. Wright, Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Description: The lecture is a take on multiculturalism that touches on the local (Vancouver), the national (Canadian) and comparative (Canadian and American) with emphasis on the effects of globalization (transnationalism and identities of diasporas) and the resultant questioning of the relevance of multiculturalism in a globalized world. Emphasis is on a defense of multiculturalism and statement about its continued relevance and strategic importance.
Bio: Handel K. Wright is an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Studies at the University of British Columbia. His research interests include the development of African cultural studies, the intersection of cultural studies and education, Black and African identity/identification and social difference in qualitative research. He has published on a variety of issues including African cultural studies, the transition from literature studies to cultural studies, drama studies in Africa, North American curriculum theorizing, and the notion of an endarkened feminist epistemology. In 2004, he published a book entitled: A Prescience of African Cultural Studies. He is currently doing research on how Canadian and American multiculturalism represents complex new youth identities.
Co-sponsors: UW Center for Multicultural Education in the College of Education; University of Washington at Bothell; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Registration: Please RSVP by May 8th to 206-543-3386 or centerme@u.washington.edu
Information: For more information, visit the Multiculturalism Center’s website at http://depts.washington.edu/centerme/home.htm
Attendance: 55 UW community members

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies


Wednesday, 17 May 2006 – Luncheon Meeting – Invitation OnlyCanadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Noon-2 p.m., Washington State Department of Community, Trade and Economics, SeattleCanadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Increasing Business Opportunities in British Columbia: Planning for the 2010 Olympics Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

 

Description The Progressive Group, Vancouver, British Columbia—Mark Jiles and Patrick Kinsella, Principals—for public affairs and business development representation of Washington companies in Vancouver, BC. will hold an initial meeting with representatives from the 2010 Task Force, business and the Washington State Department of Community, Trade and Economics. The goals of our initial contract with The Progressive Group are as follows: Assist Washington State's 2010 Task Force, CTED and related groups with 2010 Olympics Public Affairs and Business Development strategies, and specifically to:Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
1) Engage BC stakeholders in conversations to assess attitudes toward Washington engagement in the 2010 preparations;Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
2) Develop key messages for Washington State to support effective relationship development with 2010 Stakeholder Groups;Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
3) Identify 2010 Business Opportunities for Washington companies;Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
4) Provide updates and intelligence on 2010 Activities and AnnouncementsCanadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Co-sponsors: Washington State Department of Community, Trade and Economics (CTED); Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Registration: If you are interested in attending this luncheon, please contact Mary Rose, 2010 Business Manager, CTED Washington at MaryR@CTED.WA.GOVCanadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Attendance: 15 members of the business community, UW community and CTED staff. Click here for a list of attendees.Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Presentations: Governor Gregoire’s Task Force on the 2010 Olympics – Powerpoint Presentation

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies


17 May 2006 - Lecture - $15
7 pm, Kane Hall, UW Campus
Innovative Governance in Canada's Arctic: Inuit Self-Determination Efforts Today by Donat Savoie, Interim Executive Director, Inuit Relations Secretariat



Description:
The Canadian Studies Center (in conjunction with Program on the Environment, International Studies Center and the Ellison Center) is responding to the growing security, environmental and self-governance interests in the Circumpolar North through increased course content in this area and public programming. As part of this initiative, the Center is bringing Donat Savoie, Chief Federal Negotiator of the Nunavik Agreement (the Inuit self-governance initiative in Québec) and Interim Director of the Inuit Relations Secretariat (a newly created secretariat to provide a point of contact on Inuit matters for the Canadian federal government). Savoie, who has over 30 years of experience in aboriginal sovereignty negotiations, will lecture on Inuit self-determination efforts in Canada today. In this lecture, Savoie will give an introduction to the four political Inuit regions in Canada and their self-determination efforts today.
This lecture is part of "Hot Spots in Our World" -- a joint lecture series sponsored by the Jackson School of International Studies and UW Extension.
Bio:
Donat Savoie is the Interim Executive Director of the Inuit Relations Secretariat created in Spring 2005 as part of the renewed relationship between the Inuit and the Canadian government. Savoie is also the Chief Federal Negotiator for the Nunavik project establishing self-government in Nunavik.
Co-sponsors:
Canadian Consulate Seattle; UW Extension; Jackson School of International Studies Outreach Centers
Registration: Call UW Extension at 206-897-8939 or 1-800-506-1325. Or, you can register at the UW Extension site below. Tickets are $15—you can use VISA, MasterCard or a check. (Please note that the Canadian Studies Center is not handling registrations—they must go through UW Extension.) Seating is limited and this will be a popular event, so please register early. http://www.outreach.washington.edu/ext/special/jackson/default.asp
Information:
This lecture is part of the Hot Spots in Our World: A UW Jackson School Lecture Series co-sponsored by UW Extension and featuring six lectures on critical international issues. Click here for flyer
Attendance:
55 members of the UW and Seattle community, Total Lecture Series Attendance: 130


Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies

Thursday, 18 May 2006 – Roundtable Discussion – pre-registration necessaryCanadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies
3:30-5 p.m., Burke Room, Burke Museum, UW Campus
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies Roundtable Discussion on Inuit Governance Movements in Canada Today, facilitated by Donat Savoie, Chief Federal Negotiator, Nunavik Project and Interim Director, Inuit Secretariat
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies Description: Mr. Savoie will present on recent Inuit governance movements in Canada and will then facilitate a discussion based on prepared readings. Readings will be sent out at time of registration and will include: Aboriginal Self-Government Policy of the Government of Canada; copy of a paper entitled "Self-Government - A Fundamental Change in the Relationship"; "Aboriginal Governance - An Annotated Bibliography", prepared for the First Nations Governance Centre; Geographical map of Canada; a list of web sites on Governance that could be useful to the participants.
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies Co-sponsors: Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies Information/Registration: Seating is limited and pre-registration is necessary. If you are interested in attending please contact the Canadian Studies Center program assistant, Marion Cook, to reserve a space (206) 221-6374 or canada@u.washington.edu.
Attendance:Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies 20 graduate students, faculty, and community members.


Saturday, 20 May 2006 – Educator Professional Development – $25 (includes 4 clock hours, continental breakfast, curriculum materials)
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Mary Gates Hall, Room 238, UW Campus
6th Annual Documentary Film Workshop: Teaching Diversity & Cross-Cultural Understanding through Documentary Films - for high school, community college and in-service educators

Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies

Description: This half-day workshop will introduce educators to documentary films that can be used to teach students about cultural diversity and cross-cultural understanding. This year's Workshop will feature films dealing with issues for Latin American, Europe. India and the Inuit in Canada's Far North. These films provide excellent teaching "tools" for introducing critical diversity and cross-cultural issues into your classrooms today. Increasingly students learn about their world through video and film - this workshop provides an opportunity to enhance that learning to include critical social issues at the international level.
        Elizabeth Salas, American Ethnic Studies, will present on the film Walkout. Walkout is about Chicano/a students, 22,000 strong walking out of East Los Angeles high schools in 1968. The film first aired on HBO in March 2006. The film provides an excellent background as to why high school students were protesting this March about the bill in the U.S. Congress concerning illegal immigration.
More on film: http://www.hbo.com/events/walkout/index.html
       Bringing Down A Dictator documents the spectacular defeat of Slobodan Milošević in October, 2000, not by force of arms, as many had predicted, but by an ingenious nonviolent strategy of honest elections and massive civil disobedience. Vjeran Pavlaković, co-editor of Serbia since 1989: Politics and Society under Milošević and After, will discuss the film and its continued relevance, considering the recent death of Milošević at The Hague and the fact that revolutions modeled on his overthrow have taken place in other ex-communist countries. Pavlaković received his Ph.D. in History from the University of Washington in 2005.
More on film: http://www.aforcemorepowerful.org/films/bdd/index.php
Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies         Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies     Jane Dyson, Geography and Jackson School of International Studies, will present a film from India, The House of Gulmohar Avenue.  The film explores the politics of home, gender and religion in contemporary India through the "lens" of a single family. “The growing polarisation in India, the Gujarat riots, my personal life and the discomfort with these essentialised understandings – all of these led me to make The House on Gulmohar Avenue. The film was intended to be a personal exploration of what Home and Identity can mean in the context of being Muslim in India today,” (quote from the director).

The Canadian Studies Center will provide free copies of the newly released film Echo of the Last Howl about the Inuit of Nunavik in Northern Québec and the tragic loss of their sled dogs in the 1950s and 60s and the impact of this event on the communities and culture. Nadine Fabbi, from the Center, will provide participants with curriculum materials.
More on Echo: http://www.nunatsiaq.com/archives/50121/news/nunavik/50121_01.html
Co-sponsors: Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Outreach Centers
Registration: Send check for $25 payable to “University of Washington” to: Attn: Documentary Film Workshop, Canadian Studies Center, Box 353650, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195.* Please include (print legibly!): 1) Name, 2) Home Address, 3) City/State/Zip, 4) Day/Evening Phone, 5) Email 6) School, 7) Grade Level Taught.
Information: Marion Cook, Canadian Studies Center, (206) 221-6374 or canada@u.washington.edu
Attendance: 50 educators
Media: Training Summary (not for redistrubution)


Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies

T hursdays, 4-25 May 2006 – Lecture Series – $40 – registration necessary
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Edmonds Community College, Creative Retirement Institute



Canadian Course: Trace the expansion of the Canadian state from the fur trade, the succession of Rupert's Land and the Manitoba Question (Louis Riel). Further discussion will include British Columbia (1871), the Northwest Mounted Police (1874) and the role of the Canadian Pacific Railway in the growth of a national economy. Douglas Jackson is Professor Emeritus, University of Washington, where he is founder of the Canadian Studies Center.
Information/Registration: http://cri.edcc.edu/
Sponsors: Shoreline Community College; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies


Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies

Wednesday, 31 May 2006 – Academic Conference – registration necessary
2:30-5:30 p.m. (followed by a reception), Walker Ames Room, Kane Hall, UW Campus
Global Energy Supplies: Scarcity, Dependency, Alternatives, and the Challenges for International Commerce



Description: The University of Washington's Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies Certificate Program (GTTL) draws upon experts from business, government and academia to prepare our graduate students for careers that demand the combined knowledge of trade, transportation, and logistics. Our students augment their regular graduate degrees with the GTTL Certificate, and enter the workforce with a sophisticated understanding of how to manage and create effective and efficient inter-modal transportation and trade networks. The GTTL Conference, held annually, is the culmination of the GTTL Core II class. The Core II course uses a combination of readings, lectures, and discussions to explore a range of theoretical and practical issues. Along with this instruction, student teams research a topic or issue that is of special interest to various organizations in the region. This research culminates in a paper and poster session presented to a student/faculty/professional audience at the GTTL Annual Conference.
Canadian presentation: Dr. Michael Raymont became EnergyINet’s (Edmonton, Alberta’s) first permanent Chief Executive Officer in October 2005. He has extensive government and business experience and will be responsible for leading EnergyINet’s stakeholder engagement, network development, program integration and business sustainability activities. Before joining government, Michael lead several technology companies, raised pubic and private equity, developed business and marketing strategies, recruited management teams and established strategic relationships with several multinational Fortune 100 companies.
Co-sponsors: UW Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies; Canadian Consulate, Seattle; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Registration/Information: Call Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies (206) 616-5778 or gttl@u.washington.edu. Click here for Conference Flyer.
Attendance: 100 members of the university and Seattle community


Wednesday, 31 May 2006 – Lecture – free, no registration necessary
6:30-7:30 p.m., Johnson Hall, Room 075, UW Campus
Being Indigenous: Ethics, Actions and Choices against Colonialism in Canada and the United States by Professor Taiaiake Alfred, University of Victoria



Description: Taiaiake is a Kanien'kehaka, scholar and orator, will speak to indigenous struggles for dignity, unity and strength. He is the founding director of University of Victoria’s indigenous governance program and their Canada Research Chair. Dr.Taiaiake Alfred received a 2006 National Aboriginal Achievement Award and lives with his wife in the territory of the Saanich Nation. He is the author of Heeding the Voices of Our Ancestors, Peace, Power and Righteousness, and most recently Wasase: Indigenous Pathways of Action and Freedom (2005).
Co-sponsors: UW American Indian Studies; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Registration Information: For further information contact American Indian Studies Program at (206) 543-9082.
Attendance: 60 graduate students and faculty


25-30 June 2006 - K-12 Educator Professional Development - $500 (WA State Teachers), includes tuition, housing, and breakfast
Vancouver and Whistler, British Columbia
Study Canada Summer Institute: The 2006 British Columbia Experience: From the 5 Themes of Geography to the 2010 Olympics

 

Description:
Registration is already open for teachers to earn either 40 clock hours or 3 university undergraduate quarter credits for this unique K-12 educator program beginning in Vancouver B.C. and traveling by chartered bus to Whistler. Workshop sessions will be held at Simon Fraser University's Harbour Centre Campus in Vancouver and on-site at the hotel in Whistler.
Information:
Learn core information about British Columbia, Canada and the Olympic tradition. Featuring environmental sustainability and cultural issues that challenge the region. Hands-on curriculum training and resource materials. Guest speakers include faculty from Western Washington University, University of Washington, UBC, SFU and VANOC, as well as city government officials and tribal leaders. Travel scholarships are available (apply early for best support options).
Registration:
Contact tina.storer@wwu.edu as early as possible regarding your interest in the program.
Attendance:


27-28 June 2006 – Educator Professional Development - $80 (includes 16 clock hours, morning pastries, lunch)
Kane Hall, Room 110, UW Campus
The Golden Age of Aboriginal Literature in Canada



Description: This is a golden age for Aboriginal Literature. Many of the trail breakers like Jeannette Armstrong, Lee Maracle, and Ruby Slipperjack as well as Maria Campbell are continuing to publish their finest works, while a new generation of Aboriginal authors like Chris Bose, Jennifer Storm and Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm continue to raise the bar of excellence with their writing. Aboriginal author, Richard Van Camp, will share his knowledge about Aboriginal Literature and the four Aboriginal publishers across Canada. There will also be some great storytelling as well.
Canadian Presentation: Richard Van Camp, proud member of the Dogrib (Tlicho) Nation from Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, will present on Aboriginal Literature in Canada today from his list of recommended books for Grades 7-12. Van Camp, an entertaining storyteller, provides a solid foundation for introducing aboriginal literature in the classroom.
Richard Van Camp Bio: Richard Van Camp is a graduate of the En'owkin International School of Writing, the University of Victoria's Creative Writing BFA Program, and the Master's Degree in Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia, Richard currently teaches Creative Writing for Aboriginal Students at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC. He is also CBC Radio's Writer in Residence for their North by Northwest Program.
Participant Comments:
"Such a great presentation!" "Exceptional Speaker."
Co-sponsors: Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Outreach Center
Information/Registration: Contact Kristi Roundtree at the East Asia Center at barnesk@u.washington.edu
Flyer and Registration Form: Click here for a pdf file.
Attendance: 54


1-10 July 2006 - Lecture Series - registration necessary
Maasdam Transatlantic Ship, St. Pierre and Miquelon, Greenland, Iceland

"Three-Part Lecture Series on Canada," by Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director, Canadian Studies Center



"Sovereignty Movement in Québec: It's History and the Origins of St. Pierre and Miquelon." The sovereignty movement in Québec has roots that go back to the very founding of our two countries. Even today the Québec license plate reads, "Je me souviens" or "I remember." What are the Québecois remembering? And how is it that there is still a little piece of France in North America? This lecture will provide an overview of the history of the French in North America, the creation of Québec, and an overview of why it is that the Québecois wish to separate from Canada.
"The Inuit in Canada: Northern People/Northern Lands." The North and the Inuit have always held a fascination for those of us that do not live in the Arctic. This fascination stems back hundreds of years to when Europeans first came into contact with the Inuit in Greenland and later Canada. The history of "contact" is fascinating and has shaped the self-determination movements of the Inuit today. This lecture will give an overview of the Inuit as a people, the history of contact and how that shaped Inuit culture, and the innovative forms of governance that are being formed in the North today.
"Early Exploration in the North Atlantic." What if we were sailing east having no idea when and what we might "bump" into along the way? Imagine that each port we stop into is a place previously never seen or known. Imagine our anticipation! 500 years ago, Europeans had no idea that two continents lay west and indeed their travels were filled with anticipation, excitement, and surprise. This lecture will outline the history of exploration to the New World and how the voyages and discoveries of the explorers shaped our new nations from a Canadian perspective.
Co-sponsors: Holland America Lines; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Registration: Participants must be passengers on the Maasdam Ship
Attendance:  900 (300 each lecture)


Canadian Consulate, Seatte; UW School of Marine Affairs; Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of international Studies New Summer Course:

>SIS 490 A: The Ideological Distinctness of Québec in North America: Surveys, Authors, Institutions and History

>

>The Center for International Studies and Canadian Studies Center are offering a unique course this summer on Qu̩bec and a rare opportunity to study with a distinguished visiting faculty РProfessor Claude Couture. Please click here for full details >.


3-6 August 2006 - Educator Professional Development - Registration required
National Science Foundation Chautauqua Field Trip to the Olympic Peninsula
Pacific Northwest Earthquakes: Evidence in Native Myth and Tradition". (Course #36)



Description:
A 2.5 day field-trip will explore Native story locales in Puget Sound and on the Olympic Peninsula, and we will tour the University of Washington seismology laboratory. For college teachers of: all disciplines and graduate students interested in a teaching career.  Teachers of advanced secondary courses will be admitted on a space available basis.
Information:
Native American oral traditions are sophisticated and evocative mnemonic keys that categorize, compress, and communicate information about catastrophic geologic events though deep time.  Along the Pacific Coast from northern California to central Vancouver Island, earthquakes greater than magnitude 8 on the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) have been documented through paleoseismic studies, the last occurring on January 26, 1700.
   
Since Europeans arrived in the area the CSZ has been aseismic, but Native American oral traditions from more than a dozen tribal groups along the length of the CSZ include mythical stories about titanic battles between supernatural beings, reports of damage and fatalities, and counts of
generations since the occurrence of the last event.
    This course considers Native American oral traditions about landscape-altering events in Cascadia (Washington, Oregon and British Columbia) within the context of current geologic knowledge, placing Native stories that may be about past large earthquakes side-by-side with current information on seismic hazards in Cascadia as understood through modern techniques such as paleoseismology, LIDAR and GPS.
    Traditional stories from indigenous cultures with profound experience of the local geography provoke cross-discipline-thinking about cognition, science, art, culture, history, pre-history, past and future events.  These messages have endured through centuries and through extreme cultural disruption by using powerful and informative imagery.  The cause of earthquakes was not known before the middle of the 20th century, and we will compare folk beliefs from Europe and Asia to Native American earthquake ideas.
A 2.5 day field-trip will explore Native story locales in Puget Sound and on the Olympic Peninsula, and we will tour the University of Washington seismology laboratory.
    For college teachers of: all disciplines and graduate students interested in a teaching career.  Teachers of advanced secondary courses will be admitted on a space available basis.
Registration:
Details available here. Prerequisites: none. For questions, please contact Ruth S. Ludwin, Research Scientist, Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network at rludwin@u.washington.edu or http://www.ess.washington.edu/SEIS/PNSN Phone:206-543-4292


21-25, August 2006 - Continuing Education – registration necessary
8:30 am - 2 pm daily, Shoreline Community College, Shoreline, WA
Summer College for Folks Over Fifty



Canadian Lectures: Canadian Mosaics by Dr. Douglas Jackson, Professor Emeritus, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Founder, Canadian Studies Center
Description: This lecture series  will include discussions of Father Brebeuf and His Brethren; Evangeline and Pelagie in the Expulsion of the Acadians; Tom Thomson and the Group of Seven; and Tommy Douglas and the birth of Medicare in Canada.
Testimonials:
"Nearly 150 students attended and, judging from most of their comments, they really enjoyed their classes.  Their positive responses are a tribute to your expertise and willing to share your passion for you subject.
"Professor Jackson offers most comprehensive presentation, based on his in depth experience, knowledge, and passion for his native Canada.  He offers videos, recordings, and hand outs, and very generous recommendations for further subject studies and enrichment.  He shares his knowledge in a highly professional, delightful, intriguing and challenging manner."
Sponsors: Shoreline Community College; Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Contact: Shoreline Community College: 206-533-6700, http://www.shoreline.edu/ce/summercollege.htm
Attendance: 25 seniors per class


22 August 2006 - Continuing Education – registration necessary
11-Noon, Shoreline Community College, Shoreline, WA
Summer College for Folks Over Fifty



“Inuit Homelands in Canada,”
by Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Description: This lecture provides a brief overview of the Inuit internationally, globally and the sovereignty movements and land claims being negotiated today. The presentation ends with the impact of the Inuit on global culture today.
Sponsors:
Shoreline Community College; Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Contact:
Shoreline Community College: 206-533-6700, http://www.shoreline.edu/ce/Summer2006/Summercollege.html
Attendance: 80 Community Members


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Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu