December 2010 Report

Programming News


UW Libraries & Canada Collections

Note from the Canadian Collections Librarian - Vive le Québec!, by Sion Romaine, UW Libraries’ Canadian Studies Librarian

Did the recent Seattle cold-snap leave you feeling like you just wanted to curl up at home with a good DVD and make it all go away? Experience the Arctic all over again, (but without the cold feet and icy nose), with this list (http://uwashington.worldcat.org/profiles/sionromaine/lists/2134679) of DVDs, available through the University Libraries.

Three Polar bears approach the submarine USS Honolulu  280 miles from the North Pole. The bears investigated the boat for almost 2 hours before leaving. Commanded by Cmdr. Charles Harris, USS Honolulu  collected scientific data and water samples for U.S. and Canadian Universities as part of an agreement with the Arctic Submarine Laboratory and the National Science Foundation. (This file is a work of an employee of the U.S. Navy. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.)
            width=
Three Polar bears approach the submarine USS Honolulu 280 miles from the North Pole. The bears investigated the boat for almost 2 hours before leaving. Commanded by Cmdr. Charles Harris, USS Honolulu collected scientific data and water samples for U.S. and Canadian Universities as part of an agreement with the Arctic Submarine Laboratory and the National Science Foundation.

Arctic Territories is a 10 part DVD set by filmmakers Vic Pelletier and Ole Gjerstad. This comprehensive series looks at climate change, national sovereignty, military presence and control, as well as mineral exploitation, navigation and fisheries, and the changing lives of indigenous people in the North.

Arctic Rush, Battle for the Arctic and Strait Through the Ice examine how the shrinking Arctic ice cap and an ice-free Northwest Passage has created the last greatest land grab in human history with what could be grave consequences for the world's economy, the environment and for the million who live in the region. Oil on Ice and Arctic Quest focus more narrowly on the potential impacts of oil and petroleum exploration.

Finally, for a bit of comic relief, kick back with Qallunaat! : Why White People are Funny. A National Film Board of Canada production, this Gemini-winning film is a witty "study" of Qallunaat (white people) from the Inuit point of view.

New films on order, such as David Suzuki's Arctic Meltdown, and Broken Promises: The High Arctic Relocation, will be added to this list once they have been cataloged and processed.

And remember, DVDs from any of the University Libraries' three Media Centers may be requested and delivered to any library location, usually within 1-3 days!

Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page


Enelyn Vanderhoop from British Columbia gives several demonstrations on Naaxiin weaving techniques.
Enelyn Vanderhoop from British Columbia gives several demonstrations on Naaxiin weaving techniques.

First Nations Weaver Brings Canadian Culture to Educators in the Region

In early November Canadian master weaver Evelyn Vanderhoop provided a series of programs at the University of Washington’s Burke Museum. During her residency, Ms. Vanderhoop demonstrated the Naaxiin (or Chilkat style) technique of weaving to school groups and the public and conducted an in-depth workshop for teachers and experienced weavers.

Evelyn Vanderhoop is from Masset, British Columbia, and comes from a long line of Haida weavers, including her grandmother Selina Peratrovich and her mother, Delores Churchill. She is one of only a handful of weavers who have mastered the skills required for Naaxiin weaving.

Ms. Vanderhoop talked with over 200 people during her stay, including 22 elementary students and chaperones from Tera Schreiber's Homeschool Group of Seattle, and 20 students and parents from Lorie Woods' 5th grade class from St. Joseph Marquette, Yakima. She explained, “Ravenstail and Chilkat weaving share several varieties of twining and surface braiding, although they differ in pattern, construction, weight, and composition of the warp. Both are used for robes, dance aprons and other ceremonial regalia and both types of weaving originally used wool from mountain goats. Contemporary weavers now substitute sheep wool. Traditionally, ranking members of clans and house groups wore these robes during dances or when officiating at ceremonies.”

A group of local educators enjoy an all-day workshop with Vanderhoop..
A group of local educators enjoy an all-day workshop with Vanderhoop.

On Saturday morning, 13 experienced weavers and local teachers were treated to a rare opportunity to attend a hands-on workshop in this almost forgotten style. Each started a small weaving of their own, and many lingered into the afternoon to soak up every bit of knowledge from this living treasure and great ambassador of Canadian culture.

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

 

Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page


Outreach to Educators & the Community
 

Teaching Globalization and Canadian Studies through the Media
by Rachel Dane-Poirier and Kristin Marciochi

Although Canada faces problems that are unique to its identity, many of the current issues have a global undercurrent, and a deeper understanding of issues in the west and around the world is essential to truly empower students. When creating this guide, we selected themes that define the current global dynamics, and highlighted issues that pose opportunities and challenges for Canadians. Topics ranging from global inequality and indigenous rights to climate change and international food production include some of the new realities facing Canada in the world, and the Canadian content included here can be used as one resource to underscore these realities.

Daniel Hart, Center director, introduces Rosemary Gibbons, director of A Century of Genocide: The Residential School Experience about Canada's residential school system, at the 2009 documentary film workshop.
Daniel Hart, Center director, introduces Rosemary Gibbons, director of A Century of Genocide: The Residential School Experience about Canada's residential school system, at the 2009 documentary film workshop.

If you are an educator aspiring to address Canada’s role in the emerging global discourse, the content contained in this resource can act as a catalyst to initiate discussion, or to supplement existing student-driven action on issues of domestic and international significance. While the issues and resources featured in the guide are no way complete, they will serve as a springboard, allowing you to explore additional topics through some of the outstanding professional development offerings available through University of Washington’s Canadian Studies Department.

For a copy of their new curriculum guide, Teaching Globalization through Media: An Instructor’s Guide, click here.

Rachel Dane-Poirier received her M.Ed. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2010. She has spent the last nine years teaching Sciences with the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program. In addition to supporting her students in becoming active, compassionate and lifelong learners, she also encourages young people to develop an attitude of global citizenship as well as a passion for science. She lives and teaches in central Switzerland.

Kristin Marciochi graduated from Gonzaga University in 2004 where she majored in English and received a business concentration in Entrepreneurial Leadership. In 2010, she received her M.Ed. in Global Policy Studies through the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She spent time teaching in California before returning to teach in Washington State. Kristin enjoys hiking, traveling, cooking, and photography. Currently, she lives in Olympia, Washington and teaches at Tumwater High School.

Kristin’s work in documentary film was inspired by her recent attendance at a Center educator workshop on how to use documentary film to teach about cross-cultural issues. Educator workshops are supported by funding from the Center’s Program Enhancement Grant, Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Government of Canada and Title VI grant, U.S. Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

Kristin was first introduced to Canadian Studies via the Documentary Film Workshop of 2009. The workshop formed the inspiration for this project as Kristin greatly enjoyed the workshop resources and learning about how film can be used in the classroom. She is also a graduate of the K-12 STUDY CANADA institute.


Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page


 

 

Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu