University of Washington

K-12 Outreach News

K-12 STUDY CANADA is the outreach arm of the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center (NRC) on Canada and is jointly performed by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University and the Canadian Studies Center in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. Our NRC on Canada is one of seven other world region NRCs within the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. Below is news from our K-12 outreach events as well as reports from our educators on the integration of Canadian and international studies in the classroom.

 

October 2014
STUDY CANADA Summer Institute Goes to Ottawa & Montreal
by Tina Storer, Education & Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies, University of Western Washington
For more than 35 years, the STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators has been offered annually by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University and, since 1987, in collaboration with its NRC consortium partner, the Canadian Studies Center at the University of Washington's Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. More ...

Spring 2014
From the ‘Great Black North’ to Idle No More: Infusing Canadian Content Into Your Classroom
Paulette Thompson spoke at the Washington Council for Social Studies Annual Retreat at Lake Chelan on Friday, March 14, 2014. She presented on the African Canadian past, present and future from Nova Scotia to British Columbia, from Loyalist to Caribbean. The father of British Columbi and the grandmother of Jimi Hendrix are Canadians with African diasporic roots.. More ...

February 2014
Tales From Canada Storytelling
Michael Cawthra, a teacher associate of the K12-Study Canada Program, goes to schools and tell stories from different time periods and geographic areas of Canada. Dressed in costumes that change along with the renowned Canadian stories he tells, Michael relates the literature to the audience and brings the tales to life by playing a cedar flute, singing songs, and talking about language, geography, history, social issues in Canada.. More ...

December 2013
Letter from a K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate in Arizona
My name is Dennis Rees and I taught 6th – 8th Grade in the Peoria Unified School District in Peoria, Arizona, for 30 years. More ...

 

October 2013
Archives on the Arctic: Connecting to Global Issues with Primary Resources
In June 2013, twenty-three educators gathered at Metropolitan State University of Colorado, to learn about the role of the Inuit in Canada and globally thanks to a collaborative program partnership between the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada (UW and WWU) and the Library of Congress. More ... 

October 2013
K-12 STUDY CANADA Alum Awarded NEH Endowment
Diana Mackiewicz, participant in the 2012 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators, was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities award to participate in the “Native Americans of New England, A Historical Overview” program. As a web design teacher and head of the Computer Department at Eagle Hill School in Hardwick, MA, Diana opted to create a website about Native Americans that includes the First Nations and Inuit in Canada. More ....

July 2013
Master Teacher Institute Addresses Climate Change
In early July 2013, The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies’ National Resource Centers, in partnership with the Northwest International Education Association (NIEA), offered the 10th annual Community College Master Teacher Institute at the University of Washington on "At the Crossroads: Climate Change, the Environment, and Social Justice." More ...

May 2013
On the Other Side of the Border: Spoken Word, Graphic History Novels, & Lit Trips from Canada in the Social Studies Classroom at the Chelan Conference 2013
by Paulette Thompson, K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate
“You have problems. Your neighbor has problems. Between the two of you is a fence. I am actually referring to the relationship between Canada and the United States….” More ...

March 2013
K-12 STUDY CANADA Receives $20,000 Library of Congress Grant
by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University
According to The Economist, “the resource-rich Arctic is changing faster than anywhere on Earth, and its biggest transformation is just ahead. More ...
 

March 2013
Hood River Middle School becomes Arctic Living Museum
by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University
Sarah Segal, a teacher at Hood River Middle School in Oregon, attended the National Council for the Social Studies Conference in Seattle, WA this year for the wonderful professional development opportunities offered there. More ...

December 2012
NCSS Opens Windows on the World -- and especially Canada – at its Annual Conference in Seattle
by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University
The 92nd Annual National Council for the Social Studies Conference in Seattle last month was simply an outstanding professional development opportunity for the 3500 plus educators who attended the more than 400 sessions, poster presentations, clinics and workshops that were offered. More ...

December 2012
Who Owns the Arctic? Pre-NCSS Clinic
“This is an area that few students know anything about yet is vitally important to the future of not only our country, but to the world,” said one participant. More …

December 2012
International Assembly & College and University Faculty Association Welcome Reception
One of the most active groups at the National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) meeting is the International Assembly and College and University Faculty Association (IACUF). More ...

December 2012
Inuit Political Leadership in Canada & the World Today
Arctic indigenous diplomacy and international relations in the Arctic today is an international phenomenon changing how we understand global affairs. More …

October 2012
Canada in the Ida B. Wells High School at the U.W.
by Paulette Thompson, K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate
How often do you get to discuss Canadian literature and multiculturalism over breakfast with fellow educators over a weekend? More ...

August 2012
K-12 Educator Bring Canada to the Classroom
by Maureen Stevens
The young people I teach will be tomorrow's leaders and therefore they need to realize the increasing importance of Canada and its role in a successful future for the United States. More ...

July 2012
2012 Community College Master Teacher Institute – Global Education for a Sustainable Future
In early July 2012 The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, in partnership with the Northwest International Education Association (NIEA), offered the 9th annual Community College Master Teacher Institute (CCMTI) at the University of Washington (UW).  More ...


 

January 2012
Diana Mackiewicz, Eighth Grade educator at Eagle Hill School, Hardwick, Massachusetts, has utilized professional development workshops on Canada to introduce Canada’s Arctic into the classroom. In January of this year, her students produced a very impressive video on the Inuit culture. Diana is a graduate of the 2012 K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute. See movie Mackiewicz made with her students!                    

May 2011
33rd Annual K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute
View pictures ...

April 2011
National Resource Center on Canada exhibits at National Council for History Education Conference
Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist at Western Washington University’s Center for Canadian-American Studies, and Cynthia Carlisle, K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate from South Carolina, exhibited materials on behalf of both National Resource Centers on Canada to educators attending the National Council for History Education conference in Charleston, South Carolina on March 31-April 2, 2011. More ...
 

Winter 2011
Local Educator Enhances the Canadian Content in Her First Grade Classroom Thanks to STUDY CANADA Summer Institute and the Canada Valise
Dearest Tina,
I just wanted to tell you how much fun I have had teaching, and how much fun the first graders have had learning about Canada this fall. More ...


February 2011
World Affairs Council and Center Collaborate on Educator Program – Who Owns the Arctic?
On February 16th, more than 30 Puget-sound area teachers gathered together at the Pacific Science Center for a workshop organized by the World Affairs Council. More ...


November 2010
Canada Clinic presented at the 90th Annual National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Conference
In early November, the two Title VI National Resource Centers on Canada – our Pacific Northwest NRC on Canada (that links the UW Center with the Center Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University) and the Northeast NRC on Canada (that links the Canadian-American Center at the University of Maine with the Center for the Study of Canada at SUNY Plattsburgh) – offered a pre-conference Canada Clinic: Looking Beyond the 49th Parallel at the 90th Annual National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Conference at the Consulate General of Canada in Denver. More ...


November 2010
First Nations Weaver Brings Canadian Culture to Educators in the Region
In early November Canadian master weaver Evelyn Vanderhoop provided a series of programs at the University of Washington’s Burke Museum. More ...


October 2010
K-12 Study Canada Activities
In October, Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist at the Center for Canadian-American Studies (WWU) exhibited K-12 STUDY CANADA exhibited resources onbehalf of the National Resource Center (NRC) for Canada at the Idaho Council for History Education (ICHE) conference in Boise, Idaho as well as the Washington State Council for the Social Studies Fall In-Service at Edmonds-Woodway. More ...


September 2010
K-12 STUDY CANADA in Vancouver and Whistler
This summer, the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada (Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University, and the UW Canadian Studies Center) held its 32nd annual K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute in Vancouver and Whistler, British Columbia. More ...
 

July 2010
34th Annual STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators
 I have participated in many professional development programs, both in the U.S. and around the world, and this is by far the best program! More ...

June 2010
Canada and the American Curriculum: A Conference on State and National Perspectives on Canada in the US K-12 Curriculum
by Will Linser
How often have you thought about the relationship between Canada and the United States and how important that relationship is? More ...

Spring 2010
K-12 Leadership Conference in Chelan
Ever wondered how to fit social studies into a crowded language arts curriculum? More ...


Spring 2010
Film Series Closes with Canadian Film, Breakfast with Scot
The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies National Resource Centers teamed up to offer an international film series, SMAK (See Movies at Kane). More ...

Thierry and Karen

Winter 2010
Une journée à la québécoise au coeur de Seattle
C’était un beau samedi d’automne. Le soleil était au rendez-vous et de nombreux partisans des Huskys convergeaient sur l’Université de Washington. More ...

Rosemary Gibbons

Spring 2009
Native Voices Alum Presents at Documentary Film Workshop
by Anne Hilton, Outreach Coordinator
The Canadian Studies Center recently partnered with the Native Voices program and the other Jackson School Outreach Centers to bring the first Native Voices alum, Rosemary Gibbons, back to Seattle to discuss her award-winning documentary film, A Century of Genocide in the Americas: The Residential School Experience, at the Ninth Annual Documentary Film Workshop: Coming of Age in a Changing World. More ...


STUDY CANADA Summer Institute Goes to Ottawa & Montreal
by Tina Storer, Education & Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies, University of Western Washington

K-12 Summer Institute participants with a Mountie in Ottawa

For more than 35 years, the STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators has been offered annually by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University in collaboration with the Canadian Studies Center at the U.W. as part of our Title VI Pacific Northwest National Resource Center for the Study of Canada (NRC) flagship training. As a result hundreds of American teachers have been provided an excellent foundation for teaching about the vital political, economic, environmental and cultural relationships between the United States and Canada. Teachers from every state have learned about core social studies topics related to Canada and participated in activities that effectively complement faculty instruction. Important outcomes always include gaining global perspectives of civic issues, receiving numerous resources for classroom use, and developing shareable lesson plans that meet Common Core, C3 and state standards.

Since 2006, the NRC has held the program at a variety of locations in Canada. This summer, it was offered in Ottawa, Ontario and Montréal, Québec with A Capital View of Canada: Nations within a Nation as its theme to reflect a special focus on indigenous and francophone communities in Canada. Participant evaluations unanimously showed that STUDY CANADA met or exceeded expectations and merited recommendation to colleagues. Year after year, the program earns top marks from teacher-participants and, based on 2014 evaluations, a 97% grade was awarded. Susan Jeffries, a teacher from Arkansas, added: “Wow! How much I learned! I’ve traveled the world…but never really knew my own continent until this workshop.”

Julia Warren, a teacher from North Carolina, commented pointedly "the program has been phenomenal!" She and Ms. Jeffries were among a total of 17 participants from 16 U.S. states who unanimously indicated that they will include Canada in their curriculum from now on. This commitment to Canadian Studies is a vital program outcome. So that teachers across the nation can also benefit from the program, faculty PowerPoint presentations and teacher-created curricula are posted online at http://www.k12studycanada.org/resources_lesson_plans.html.

To further expand program outcomes and NRC outreach, 11 teachers volunteered to join the NRC’s network of more than 50 educators who serve as teacher associates who, in turn, provide resource assistance to colleagues and offer presentations on Canada at conferences in their home states. Additional details about participant evaluations and program impacts are provided in a “2014 Report Card” posted online at http://www.k12studycanada.org/scsi.html.

LaDawndra Robbs, a Missouri teacher whose lesson plan will focus on Underground Railroad connections to Canada, recently wrote expressing “This summer changed my life!” It is undoubtedly true that STUDY CANADA has played an important role in training American teachers about Canada so that their students are not only more knowledgeable about Canada but also appreciate the importance of our shared past and contemporary cooperative international relations, especially regarding global issues. Next year, STUDY CANADA will continue to build on its past success as program venues change to Seattle and Victoria, British Columbia with Across the Salish Sea: Canada-US Connections in the Pacific Northwest as the stimulating new program theme.

Link to photo album: http://www.k12studycanada.org/galleries/scsi2014.html

Link to program: http://www.jsis.washington.edu/events/search.php?d%5Bstart%5D=&d%5Bend%5D=&center=canada&searchtext=&id=5311

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Spring 2014
From the ‘Great Black North’ to Idle No More: Infusing Canadian Content In Your Classroom

“….But we survived /so in every Country, every Province, every City/When they ask me/ Where I’m from/I tells ‘em/My Whole family tree/From the roots to the leaves/ Are Canadian history/We are The Black Scotians ” --Reed “Izreal” Jones. “The Black Scotians” in The Great Black North: Contemporary African Canadian Poetry (p. 150).

What do Canadians such as Sir James Douglas, Nora Hendrix, and Drake have in common? Paulette Thompson spoke at the Washington Council for Social Studiers Annual Retreat at Lake Chelan on Friday, March 14, 2014. She presented on the African Canadian past, present and future from Nova Scotia to British Columbia, from Loyalist to Caribbean. The father of British Columbi and the grandmother of Jimi Hendrix are Canadians with African diasporic roots

Thompson used the poetry from the recent book, The Great Black North: Contemporary African Canadian Poetry, as a way to draw people in. A poem such as Reed “Izreal” Jones’, “The Black Scotians,” is a veritable trove of Black Canadian history because it takes the reader from Mattieu da Costa in 1603 to the Underground Railroad to today, all the while reminding everyone of the poet’s roots in eighteenth century Nova Scotia. The poetry in this anthology represents the diversity of people of African descent in Canada. Various poems could be used to infuse Canadian content into U.S. classrooms as well.

While poetry is more likely to be considered English Language Arts territory, primary source documents tend to be firmly on social studies ground. Session participants were also interested in the civics lessons of the Idle No More movement, an indigenous social movement that went worldwide. Idle No More took us back to Canada’s Indian Act and its connection to Bill C- 45. Bill C- 45 became federal law in Canada in 2012, changing rules concerning First Nations’ sovereignty, especially the leasing of reserve lands by First Nations communities, protection of waterways, and processes to assess environmental concerns. These changes were pushed through without consultation with indigenous leaders — even though the Canadian government is required to do so before passing legislation affecting First Nations communities.

One chief, Theresa Spence, started a fast to protest the refusal of the Canadian government to talk with indigenous leaders. After several weeks, the Canadian government was pressured to talk with Chief Spence as a result of flash mobs, blockades, rallies, teach-ins, and other actions all over Canada and then the rest of the world.

It was through the use of social media that four women (three indigenous and one EuroCanadian woman) and then others built a protest movement. This movement allowed us to think more about the role of social media and social change in our classrooms. The session attendees talked about comparing and contrasting these issues on both sides of the border.

There was so much to talk about in the session. Unfortunately there was too little time. Participants did begin a conversation about the fact that there is a place for African Canadian content in our classrooms.

Mary Bernson, Director of the East Asian Resource Center at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies also talked about the retreat and Thompson's lecture: "The Social Studies Leadership Retreat, held annually in Central Washington by the Washington State Council for the Social Studies, attracts an audience of teacher-leaders from around the state. The Jackson School of International Studies is a conference co-sponsor, in recognition of the contributions made by Canadian Studies and other Jackson School Centers that send speakers every year. Paulette Thompson, a highly regarded teacher and Council board member, led an effective session that built upon her experiences learning about Canada and teaching in the Seattle schools. Because this is a residential conference, she was also able to share her knowledge informally during meals and breaks."

“STUDY CANADA,” the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada’s annual professional development workshop, has been offered by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University for the last 34 years serving educators from almost every state in the nation. The Institute is funded, in part, by a Title VI grant from International and Foreign Language Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education. Paulette is a Humanities and World Language Teacher in the Ida B. Wells School for Social Justice and a U.W. graduate student in Education, Curriculum and Instruction (Multicultural Education). View the K-12 STUDY CANADA website.

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February 2014
Tales From Canada - Storytelling by Michael Cawthra

The K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute (Ottawa 2011) trains educators from across the United States to become Teacher Associates who, like Michael, go on to reach more educators through their work.

Michael Cawthra, a teacher associate of the K12-Study Canada Program, goes to Denver-area classrooms by telling stories that only captivate students but inform them about Canada. Dressed in costumes that change along with the renowned Canadian stories he tells, Michael relates the literature to the audience and brings the tales to life by playing a cedar flute, singing songs, and talking about language, geography, history, social issues in Canada.

Cawthra provides a full two hour performance takes the audience from the beginning of history to modern time with tales set in different geographic regions and time periods written by Aboriginal peoples, H. W. Longfellow, Jack London, and Roch Carrier. He also provides a PowerPoint presentation with visual accompaniment to the stories—with publishers’ permission for each book selected to use photos, maps, and pictures projected onto a school/classroom screen. These shows are suitable for classrooms, libraries, auditoriums, or cafeteria large group settings. Fourth grade students and up have loved the experience!

Karen Palmarini, Trade Commissioner and Diplomatic Services Assistant, Consulate General of Canada in Denver explained the Consulate General of Canada in Denver has had a long and prosperous relationship with Michael Cawthra, a retired K12 teacher who is passionate about Canada and Canadian culture. Michael has generously volunteered with the Canadian Consulate in diverse educative activities, such as helping the Consulate recruit teachers from the states in our territory (Colorado, Kansas, Montana and Wyoming) to attend the summer institute workshop organized by Tina Storer; working with the Consulate K-12 coordinator in orchestrating a successful Summer Institute workshop in Calgary in 2007; participating in the Colorado Conference of Social Studies by promoting Canada content in the K-12 curriculum; and as storyteller, gave presentations to a number of Colorado elementary and middle schools on Canada tales. It has been such a pleasure to have Mike demonstrating a warm interest in promoting the K-12 study program in our territory and beyond. We need more “ambassadors” of Canada like Michael in our community to build a stronger relationship between Canada and the U.S. and to understand better one another by working together.

Educators that have used Tales from Canada to teach their students about Canadian history and have enjoyed Cawthra’s storytelling. Al Snelling, 6th grade teacher at Kendallvue Elementary in Jefferson County, has expressed his pleasure of Cawthra’s work: “It is no accident that Tales from Canada, is at the top of our list when planning activities for our week in the mountains. Michael has put together an interesting and entertaining program that keeps not only students, but adults and high school leaders, riveted with his tremendous story-telling. Our students learn about the history of many parts of Canada not only through his stories, but a multimedia presentation that helps students become more familiar with our neighbor to the north. Mike's experience as a former schoolteacher and his passion for this program are clearly on display with each and every presentation. I highly recommend Tales from Canada to my peers as a program that is not only educational, but entertaining.”

Cawthra also created an Activity Plan for Grades 5-8, which Western Washington University features here: http://www.k12studycanada.org/files/lesson_plans/2005/M%20Cawthra% 20Province%20and%20Territories%20Poster%20Activity%20Plan.pdf. The activity requires a week-long block of time for students to learn about a province/territory of Canada and then, in turn, present their newfound knowledge and teach others in class about the area they studied. The students research facts, famous people from their area, historic events, symbols, and make a map. A rubric for evaluating student efforts is included.

After participating in STUDY CANADA in 2005, Michael signed on as a teacher-associate and helped the Denver consulate coordinate a K-12 educator training program in 2007 called “Alberta Bound.” Michael also performed his storytelling as one of the program presenters. Michael’s outreach work is a great asset for Denver-area schools and our NRC has benefited by his introducing teachers to both the resources on our website and the annual STUDY CANADA Summer Institute.

The Canadian Studies Center forms the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center (NRC) on Canada with the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University (WWU). Tina Storer, at WWU, serves as Education and Curriculum Specialist for the NRC. STUDY CANADA is the NRC's annual professional development workshop, offered by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University for the last 34 years serving educators from almost every state in the nation. The Institute is funded, in part, by a Title VI grant from International and Foreign Language Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education.

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December 2013
Letter from a K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate in Arizona
by Dennis Rees, Peoria Unified School District teacher, Peoria, Arizona

Dennis Rees (far left) and other educators at the NRC's "Archives on the Arctic" workshop in Denver, CO. (06/13)

My name is Dennis Rees and I taught 6th – 8th Grade in the Peoria Unified School District in Peoria, Arizona, for 30 years. I have had a wonderful career as a teacher focused on improving geography education in middle school classrooms. In 2007, I even received the first Grosvenor Teacher Fellowship from the National Council for Geographic Education for my efforts and was graciously awarded with a Lindblad Expedition to the Galapagos Islands as well as a $3000 honorarium. Even so, a highlight for me has been learning about Canada and encouraging other teachers to include new and improved content on Canada in their social studies classrooms.

Over the last eleven years, I have been fortunate to participate in several workshops offered by the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center (NRC) on Canada, including three “STUDY CANADA Summer Institutes”. My first experience was in 2002 when the program was held on the campus of Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA. I participated again in 2006 when “STUDY CANADA” moved to Vancouver and Whistler, BC and focused on themes connected to 2010 Winter Olympics and, again in 2012, when a “Capital View of Canada: Nations within a Nation” became the theme and the location moved to its capital city, Ottawa, ON. In addition, last June, I participated in a special “Archives on the Arctic: Connecting to Global Issues with Primary Sources” workshop that the NRC offered with a grant from the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Western Regional Center. Combined, these experiences provided me with a huge wealth of information about Canada’s geography, history, government, culture, and economy. The presenters were knowledgeable and enthusiastic. I always came home with a fire in my belly to spread the word about Canada not only in my school but also at professional development events.

One way I promoted Canada at my school was to create a “Canada Resource Shelf” in our Geography Lab. It contained an artifact box filled with items that were examples of Canadian culture, heritage, geography, and economy. In addition to that, I collected resource materials, maps, digital media, music, children’s literature, and instructional materials that teachers could use in their classroom to teach about Canada. Several of these items were inspired by resources found in the K-12 STUDY CANADA Resource Valise, a teacher loan-kit available to teachers across the country for a 3-week loan period (to learn more, see http://www.k12studycanada.org/resources_valise.html).

Classroom lessons were also expanded and shared as part of professional development presentations made at national education conferences such as NCSS San Diego (2007) and NCGE Lake Tahoe (2006), San Marcos (2012), Denver (2013) as well as at several regional Arizona Geographic Alliance GeoConferences. These presentations helped me not only get the word out about the NRC’s K-12 STUDY CANADA resources at www.k12studycanada.org<http://www.k12studycanada.org> and the summer institute but also to show the need for greater knowledge about Canada in our social studies curricula. Though now retired, this is how I continue to share knowledge about Canada with colleagues and I am delighted to do so on behalf of the NRC as a K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate.

As a result of my professional development training by the NRC, access to K-12 STUDY CANADA resources, and my continued outreach, many students, pre-service teachers, classroom teachers and social studies supervisors have been impacted. It has been rewarding to know that they left our interaction with a better understanding of Canada, our too often-overlooked northern neighbor.

As an active member of several education organizations, I encourage others to explore the NRC’s resources and, especially, participate in a STUDY CANADA Summer Institute – the experience is transformative for teachers at every level of education…and all who know me recognize that I do not give such compliments often or lightly. Thanks to all at WWU and UW for the professional development opportunities and support provided to teachers like me. I wish you continued success in bringing Canada into American classrooms.

The Canadian Studies Center forms the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center (NRC) on Canada with the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University (WWU).Tina Storer, at WWU, serves as Education and Curriculum Specialist for the NRC. STUDY CANADA is the NRC's annual professional development workshop, offered by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University for the last 34 years serving educators from almost every state in the nation. The Institute is funded, in part, by a Title VI grant from International and Foreign Language Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education.

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October 2013
Archives on the Arctic: Connecting to Global Issues with Primary Resources

Twenty-three educators participated in Archives on the Arctic in Denver, Colorado.

Twenty-three educators participated in Archives on the Arctic in Denver, Colorado.

In June 2013, twenty-three educators gathered at Metropolitan State University of Colorado, to learn about the role of the Inuit in Canada and globally thanks to a collaborative program partnership between the Pacific Northwest National Resource on Canada and Library of Congress.

The Arctic is emerging as one of the most important regions in our global world. Students need an understanding of this region, including its people, to help them understand about current discussions. – participant

For students to be citizens of the world, they must understand how events in one place affect people in other places. Understanding the issues of the Arctic and their impacts will help achieve this since this region is one they can relate to. - participant

On Day One of the program began with two lectures by Nadine Fabbi – “History of the Inuit in Canada and the Circumpolar North” and “Climate Change as a Human Rights Issue in the Arctic.”

The lectures were followed by a session by Michelle Pearson, Teacher Associate, Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources, and educator/historic preservation specialist for History Colorado. Michelle engaged the educators in an active exercise to illustrate how primary sources can be used to spur student interest in a topic. Most appropriately, the photo utilized was of a group of Inuit from Nunatsiavut in eastern Canada who travelled to Seattle in 1909 to participate in the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (World Fair).

Michelle gave a thorough overview of how to search for materials on the Library of Congress website noting the significant developments on the site over the last few years including tremendous new resources on Canada.

On Day Two, Nadine provided a third lecture entitled, “International Relations and Indigenous Diplomacies in the Arctic,” focused on how Inuit remapping and renaming of the Arctic region is facilitating a more effective Inuit voice in global affairs. The lecture introduced the Inuit concept of territory – nunangat – or territory as land, sea and ice.

Peggy O’Neill-Jones, professor at Metropolitan State University of Denver and director of the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources program at the University as well as the Western Region program, followed with a presentation on curriculum design.

Tina wrapped up the workshop with “best practices” for lesson plans and other sources for resources including the K-12 STUDY CANADA resource site http://www.k12studycanada.org/resources_teacher_resources.html. The creation of a lesson plan, or presentation at an educator conference, is required of all participants.

The participants represented 10 states – Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington – and ranged from social studies to science educators, heads of state geographical organizations to editors of educational journals. During time dedicated to exploring topics for lesson plans, a number of wide-ranging topics emerged. How do we understand Inuit concepts of sea ice and its potential influence on international law? How does the Arctic environment shape Inuit culture? Who owns the Arctic? How do we define the Arctic as a region? How is the Arctic serving as a barometer for global warming?

Educators noted that Arctic is nowhere in the U.S. curriculum yet, the region will be the most impacted by our activities than any other region now and in the future. They will go on to produce lesson plans to incorporate into their classrooms, to share with other educators, and to present at conferences.

Archives on the Arctic wiki website: https://archivesonthearctic2013.pbworks.com/w/page/66923556/TPS%20Level%20I

The program was generously funded by a grant from the Library of Congress, Western Region Program. Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies, was the Principle Investigator of the $20,000 grant. The purpose of the Teaching with Primary Resource grants is for the activities of the grants to continue into the future. The grants are for in-service professional development and educational programs for teachers and available on a rolling basis.

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October 2013
K-12 STUDY CANADA Alumna Awarded NEH Endowment

Diana T. Mackiewicz poses with U.S. Ambassador to Canada, David Jacobson at a trip to the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa during the 2012 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute.

Diana Mackiewicz, participant in the 2012 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators, was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities award to participate in the “Native Americans of New England, A Historical Overview” program. As a web design teacher and head of the Computer Department at Eagle Hill School in Hardwick, MA, Diana opted to create a website about Native Americans that includes the First Nations and Inuit in Canada.

In a letter to the NRC, Diana wrote, “This summer I worked on a National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) Grant about Native Americans at the University of Massachusetts and completed an eight page website as my final assignment. I included many resources from Canada and also focused one page on the Inuit at http://researchdtmack.com/inuit.html. While completing this project I thought much about what I had learned during the 2012 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute in Ottawa and Montréal.

During the process of making the project at the NEH workshop, we were asked to compose an essential question to guide students in their research. It concerns ethics involved in understanding and attaining information from Native Americans.

Finally, because of all the STUDY CANADA training and the research that I have conducted since then, I will be offering a class called, "Indigenous Peoples of North America" at my high school. It is a hopeful attempt to bring attention to teaching about indigenous peoples at the high school level. This too was an idea inspired from my time at STUDY CANADA.

The website I created is http://researchdtmack.com and there are links to other websites I have completed in the past several years. The Native American site has a turtle image since my site created for the NEH is called Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island.

Thank you for the all of the presentations and inspiration at the Institute.”

The National Resource Center on Canada appreciates the feedback from past program participants and the recognition given by NEH to their professional endeavors that follow.

The Canadian Studies Center forms the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center (NRC) on Canada with the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University (WWU).Tina Storer, at WWU, serves as Education and Curriculum Specialist for the NRC. STUDY CANADA is the NRC's annual professional development workshop, offered by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University for the last 34 years serving educators from almost every state in the nation. The Institute is funded, in part, by a Title VI grant from International and Foreign Language Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education.

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July 2013
Master Teacher Institute Addresses Climate Change

In early July 2013, The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies’ National Resource Centers, in partnership with the Northwest International Education Association (NIEA), offered the 10th annual Community College Master Teacher Institute at the University of Washington on "At the Crossroads: Climate Change, the Environment, and Social Justice." Twenty-three faculty, from as far away as Spokane and Yakima, participated.

Their goal was to utilize the theme of climate change to increase international content in their courses. The seven presentations by UW faculty and local experts, focused on climate change, the environment and social justice in an increasingly globalized world.

David Battisti, UW faculty in Atmospheric Sciences and Tamaki Endowed Chair of Atmospheric Sciences, provided the keynote lecture on climate change and its causes. He utilized a number of models to illustrate that climate change is occurring as a result of human activity. David engaged the faculty in working out a few mathematical equations illustrating that if we wish to stabilize CO2 levels globally, and if the United States were to emit only its fair share of carbon dioxide, the United States would have to reduce current level of emissions to just 2 percent - a staggering figure.

Battisti also pointed out the huge impact of climate change to particular regions in the world. For example, the Arctic region would see the loss of perennial sea ice having a significant impact on local communities; and, South and Southeast Asia would suffer the highest temperature increases with significant impact on food production. His presentation illustrated the important relationship between regional impacts of climate change to the need for global policy development.

Andrea Arai, faculty in the Jackson School and a Japan specialist, brought an anthropological perspective and focused on teaching pedagogy, using her course on Global Sustainability Movements (JSIS 478 B) to illustrate her points. She showcased different teaching strategies using online discussion forums, ethnographic projects, site visits to local P-Patches and the annual Sakura-Con anime convention, and pairing students from Japan and the UW to collaborate on joint activities.

Andrea Rodgers Harris, a Seattle environmental law attorney, discussed the “public trust doctrine.” According to Rodgers Harris, “The public trust doctrine is an ancient legal mandate establishing a sovereign’s obligation to hold critical natural resources in trust for the benefit of present and future generations. The doctrine has roots in Roman and British law and has been extensively applied by American and International courts of law."

Increasingly, citizens are pressuring governments to protect the public trust including the atmosphere. Rodgers Harris pointed to a global movement of legal cases to protect the environment, citing specific cases from the Ukraine, Columbia, Uganda, and the Philippines. Similar to the earlier speakers, she discussed the notion of “fair share” – a guideline that all global regions have equal rights to “the commons” requiring global legal regimes.

Stanley Asah, faculty in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, College of the Environment, provided a presentation on hydro-politics – or the politics among states over water resources that transcend international boundaries – providing examples from the Lake Chad Basin in Africa. Lake Chad is currently only 5 percent of its original size and shared by several countries. Here global climate change is impacting local resources, local politics, and local livelihoods.

The Honorable Brian Baird Ph.D., president of Antioch University-Seattle, former Washington state congressman from the 3rd Congressional district (1999 to 2011), and JSIS faculty for the 2012 JSIS Task Force on marine protected areas, gave an engaging talk on global “overheating” and ocean acidification. He compellingly argued that education is not enough – we have to engage students in reflection on the issues. Global overheating and ocean acidification are the real problems. It is absolutely known and undisputed that increased CO2 in the air will retain greater energy from sunlight and heat; and that CO2 in water will change the PH level of water and make it more acidic. And, as he eloquently stated, we have currently reached carbon dioxide levels of almost 400 parts per million (ppm) – after maintaining levels of 180 ppm for more than 800,000 years.

Heidi Gough, research faculty in Civil and Environmental Engineering, brought the conversation back to applied research and direct student involvement in climate change issues. She established a UW study-abroad program that takes students to Jordan to study water issues. The Middle East is one of the most water-stressed regions in the world creating considerable political tensions among the countries in the region. For example, like Lake Chad, the Dead Sea is disappearing at a profound rate; and, the Jordan River has been almost completely drained by national canals. Gough pointed out that a major challenge in international education is taking local approaches to, in this case water engineering, and applying them to other regions of the world. Her presentation pointed out the significant unique challenges to water engineering in Jordan and the region.

Ross Coen, a doctoral student in history, affiliated graduate student of Canadian Studies, and published author of Breaking Ice for Arctic Oil: The Epic Voyage of the SS Manhattan through the Northwest Passage (2012), spoke about the Canada-United States relationship regarding resources development in the Arctic. Canada and the Arctic region is probably the least-understood region in the world, yet one of the most vital concerning environmental impacts as a result of global warming. Drawing on research from his book, Ross provided a fascinating history of the global dispute over the Northwest Passage and the implications of that debate over sovereignty, natural resource development, and most importantly, the context for the fast-emerging global disputes over the Arctic.

After the presentations, Tamara Leonard, Associate Director, Center for Global Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, facilitated a discussion with the faculty about ways to incorporate the information into their teaching, develop new classroom processes, and maintain on-going communication and collaboration. Faculty discussed points made in the presentations -- particularly questions they had regarding hope and action in an age of climate crisis. Faculty also analyzed how the information was presented as models for classroom experience and engagement. The discussion drew on international examples for responses to local challenges. Faculty also stressed the importance of having some background in science in order to understand and communicate to students the policy issues pertaining to environmental management. “I think an interdisciplinary understanding of these issues,” one faculty member observed, “is what will best serve the challenges facing our world.”

NIEA is a consortium of community colleges dedicated to increasing student and faculty opportunities for international education, training, and exchange. In 2003, Leonard founded the Community College Master Teacher Institute with NIEA. Since then, over 275 faculty from dozens of community colleges across Washington state have participated in the workshop benefiting from the expertise of Jackson School faculty, staff and affiliated researchers.

Funding for the Community College Master Teacher Institute was provided, in part, by grant allocations from the National Resource Center Programs, International and Foreign Language Education, U.S. Department of Education, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and the Northwest International Education Association.

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies is home to eight National Resource Centers: Canadian Studies Center, Center for Global Studies, Center for West European Studies, East Asia Center, Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Middle East Center, South Asia Center, and Southeast Asia Center.

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May 2013
On the Other Side of the Border: Spoken Word, Graphic History Novels, & Lit Trips from Canada in the Social Studies Classroom at the Chelan Conference 2013
by Paulette Thompson, K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate

“You have problems. Your neighbor has problems. Between the two of you is a fence. I am actually referring to the relationship between Canada and the United States….”

At most conferences the blurb underneath your session title is enough of a selling point. Not so at the Annual Spring Social Studies Conference presented by the Washington State Council for the Social Studies, the Jackson School for International Studies at the University of Washington and the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction held at Campbell’s Resort in Chelan, Washington over the weekend of March 15 - 17, 2013 where presenters are required to stand up before all assembled and give a brief introduction about their sessions. It is in this way that K – 16 educators at the conference are able to make more informed decisions about which sessions to attend.

This year’s theme was “Rethink, Recharge, Reflect: Enriching Your Role as a Social Studies Educator”. Although this theme did not mention Canada per se, I thought it was important to bring Canada into the picture. I maintain that when teachers bring multiple perspectives on social studies topics into their classrooms, they can include rich Canadian voices concerning civic ideals and controversies from Canadian contexts. Canadian literature is often the missing link in U.S. classrooms. Why not rethink, recharge, and reflect and enrich one’s role by bringing in these ‘new’ voices? Furthermore, when educators are inspired by such materials and make a practice of writing alongside their students, their students begin to see that reading and writing provides opportunities to rethinking, recharging and reflecting.

Eleven educators attended the session. We took time to discuss the quality and the variety of materials presented. The themes embedded in this literature were those issues that should not be taboo in social studies classroom: politics, race, ethnicity, poverty, class, gender, national identity, immigration, and the relationship between the U.S. and Canada. We talked about ways to use these primary sources in the classroom. It became clear that making room for Canadian content in their U.S. History courses, World History, as well as in Civics or Contemporary World Problems courses was manageable.

The teachers stated that the highlights of the session included selections from Canadian slam poet Shane Kocyzan ( “This is my voice” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bwadV-Ha9c and “Grandma’s Got It Going On” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f02Q5IFoyKw), a piece from C.R. Avery ( a short version of "Pierre Elliott Trudeau" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vViL3mOoe-U )and finally one song from dub poet Lillian Allen("I fight back " http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jISfiTmz6B8).

I brought too much to share. I had hoped to use Chester Brown’s graphic history on Louis Riel to segue into the present day discussions surrounding the now worldwide “Idle No More” movement that started among Canadian First Nations activists last year. Towards the end of the session, we all wrote. There was only enough time to for one person to share what was created. Still, we crossed the border—together.

Paulette Thompson is a high school Humanities teacher at the Ida B. Wells School for Social Justice @ University of Washington. Along with being a graduate student in the U.W. College of Education, she is also a longtime supporter of the Canadian Studies Centre.

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March 2013
K-12 STUDY CANADA Receives $20,000 Library of Congress Grant
by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University

According to The Economist, “the resource-rich Arctic is changing faster than anywhere on Earth, and its biggest transformation is just ahead. Due to climate change, the polar ice cap is shrinking and floating summer ice is projected to disappear altogether, setting alarm bells ringing for environmentalists, but opening up new perspectives for trade and development.” In order to meet future challenges, it is vital that today’s students learn more about issues already at play in the Arctic so it is timely, indeed, that the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada (a University of Washington-Western Washington University consortium) was recently awarded a $20,000 Teaching with Primary Sources (Western Region) Grant by the Library of Congress to offer a 2-1/2 day professional development workshop for K-12 educators called “Archives on the Arctic: Connecting to Global Issues with Primary Sources”.

The professional development workshop program will be held in Denver, CO in June 2013 on the campus of the Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSUD) in partnership with TPS Western Division staff, so that K-12 social studies and science teachers from throughout the western United States can be trained about cultural and environmental challenges in the circumpolar north as well as about the use of Library of Congress and the World Digital Library archival materials.

Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist at WWU’s Center for Canadian-American Studies, submitted the grant proposal because the NRC on Canada has developed a strong reputation for K-12 outreach related to the circumpolar north. She will serve as the project director. Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director of UW’s Canadian Studies Center, has extensive expertise and experience on the topic so she will offer three presentations that provide workshop participants with the foundation for teaching about complex historical, cultural, environmental and geo-political issues related to the north. Additional instruction will be offered by Teaching with Primary Sources Program staff and their teacher-associates to introduce participants to a rich reservoir of digitized primary source materials. Instructional tools for actively engaging students in historical inquiry and developing primary source-based curricula for posting on the TPS Western Region and K-12 STUDY CANADA websites will also be shared.

At least twenty leaders in education from across the western United States with experience or interest in performing outreach, including K-12 STUDY CANADA teacher-associates, will be invited to participate in the workshop. A travel stipend will be offered to all and their accommodations, 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches and 1 dinner will be covered by the grant, contingent on participants’ development of curricula and/or performance of additional outreach in their home states.

According to the grantors, the impressive potential for extended outreach was a key factor in the proposal’s success. In addition, because the interrelationships between the US and Canada are particularly pronounced in the Arctic—whether the topic is geographical boundaries, indigenous cultures, resource exploitation, transportation or political conflicts—classroom instruction inevitably leads to this important cross-border relationship and, as such, is a “natural fit” for an NRC on Canada-Library of Congress collaboration. It is hopefully the first of many to come.

“STUDY CANADA,” the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada’s annual professional development workshop, has been offered by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University for the last 34 years serving educators from almost every state in the nation. The Institute is funded, in part, by a Title VI grant from International and Foreign Language Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education. Paulette is a Humanities and World Language Teacher in the Ida B. Wells School for Social Justice and a U.W. graduate student in Education, Curriculum and Instruction (Multicultural Education). View the K-12 STUDY CANADA website.

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March 2013
Hood River Middle School becomes Arctic Living Museum
by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University

6th Grade students at Hood River MS displaying their skills, knowledge and research projects at an Inuit Cultural Fair on Friday, February 1, 2013.

Sarah Segal, a teacher at Hood River Middle School in Oregon, attended the National Council for the Social Studies Conference in Seattle, WA this year for the wonderful professional development opportunities offered there. New Social Studies Content Standards were recently adopted by the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) and include a unit on the Inuit. After participating in a pre-conference clinic at NCSS called "Who Owns the Arctic? Arctic Peoples and Global Change" presented by the National Resource Centers on Canada, Ms. Segal returned to her school inspired to implement a 6th grade-wide cultural unit including exploration of the Inuit Nations of the circumpolar north. Sarah Segal describes the cross-cultural undertaking as a living-museum of students’ learning, enthusiastic generation of traditional artifacts, and participation in the culminating Arctic Cultural Fair activity - highlighting the role of Inuit Peoples of the Arctic Council.

Using resources and information from the “Who Owns the Arctic? Arctic Peoples and Global Change” workshop, along with ODE Social Studies Content Standards, teaching Inuit history created the foundation for the Arctic Cultures unit. Integrating science to investigate how cultures develop due to their environment led to expanding this unit to include ALL regions in the Arctic Circle. Comparing pre-1900 life-ways (prior to arrival of traders) to modern-day life-ways, further directed investigating environmental, social, economic, and political, changes that have taken place in the last century.
Students learned that in 2011, indigenous arctic peoples came together to create the Arctic Council and explored their role in assessing, create reports, and informing the general public about trade routes through the arctic, extraction of natural resources, and how global weather changes effect individual country's environments along the Arctic Ocean.

The entire Hood River Middle School 6th grade then spent the month of January developing a student-created ‘living museum’ Arctic Cultural Fair. Students learning was guided through use of the 8 Cultural Universals: Communication, Arts & Aesthetics, Recreation, Family Structure, Political Organization, Attitudes Towards the Unknown (+ Rituals), Economics, and Food/Clothing/Shelter. Every 6th grade student (180+) dressed to represent their arctic cultural, in addition to displaying a variety of technology presentations and object models of the cultural universals. These will included dancing, games, foods for sampling, murals, informational posters, student-generated and original artifacts, and much more. In addition, the Family and Consumer Science classes used traditional smoking techniques to prepare meat in the school’s native plant arboretum. Furthermore, students researched and created visual displays of their culture in regards to environment. For example, most arctic cultures find significance in the northern lights; treasure meat such as salmon, caribou, and walrus; and the festivals such as Christmas, are derived from folklore of a man bearing gifts on a sleigh and entering the home through chimneys' (because doors are buried under snow), comes from the Lapland Saami of Scandinavia.

On Friday, March 1st, from 1-2pm, the Hood River Middle School Multi-Purpose Room (MPR) was be sectioned into 6 geographic regions to represents the 7 Permanent Arctic Council. Homerooms broken into council members (Inuit, Athabaskan, Gwich’in, Aleut, RAIPON, and Saami) a ‘living-museum’ for public viewing was created.

The NRC on Canada presenters, Nadine Fabbi (UW), Tina Storer (WWU), Betsy Arntzen (U Maine) and Amy Sotherden (SUNY Plattsburgh) were delighted by this impressive outcome of their outreach. It is wonderful to see the impact of Ms. Segal’s newfound knowledge on her students as well as the entire 6th grade class at Hood River Middle School.
Congratulations to Sarah Segal, her fellow 6th grade teachers, and the entire class of students at Hood River Middle School for a job well done! You have not only met but exceeded new content standards and your successful approach will undoubtedly inspire others in the state and across the country to use your unit as a best practice model.

“STUDY CANADA,” the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada’s annual professional development workshop, has been offered by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University for the last 34 years serving educators from almost every state in the nation. The Institute is funded, in part, by a Title VI grant from International and Foreign Language Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education. Paulette is a Humanities and World Language Teacher in the Ida B. Wells School for Social Justice and a U.W. graduate student in Education, Curriculum and Instruction (Multicultural Education). View the K-12 STUDY CANADA website.

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December 2012
NCSS Opens Windows on the World -- and especially Canada – at its Annual Conference in Seattle
by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University

From left to right: Brenda Ball (B.C.S.S.T.A. Board Member and Social Studies Chair at Crofton House School – Vancouver, BC); Joy Kogawa (renowned author of the award-winning novel Obasan); and Tina Storer (Conference Co-Chair and WWU Center for Canadian-American Studies’ Education and Curriculum Specialist) at Kogawa’s “Conversation with an Author” session.

The 92nd Annual National Council for the Social Studies Conference in Seattle last month was simply an outstanding professional development opportunity for the 3500 plus educators who attended the more than 400 sessions, poster presentations, clinics and workshops that were offered. It was my honor to be selected by NCSS leaders two years ago as a co-chair to ensure participation by Canadians in the region and inclusion of content connected to Canada in the conference program.

Although our NRC has worked with NCSS before to increase the profile for Canada among social studies educators, no conference has provided so many opportunities! Almost 700 educators at the conference gained new knowledge about Canada directly through professional development sessions and meetings. Indeed, almost everyone was impacted by the effort when attendance at all thirty-four Canada-related events is considered (including a shared NRCs on Canada exhibit and receptions/scholarships supported by Canadian sponsors). All told, there were 27 Canadians, 3 Canadians who reside in the US, and 8 Americans who presented on Canada at NCSS 2012. It was wonderful learning from them all and to meet so many others from across Canada!

To advocate for greater inclusion of Canada in U.S. classrooms, the two NRCs collaboratively presented “Canada and the American Curriculum: A National Approach to Canadian Studies” to the Council of State Social Studies Specialists (CS4). This presentation stands out from the rest because it holds great potential impact for curricular reform since state leaders nationwide are currently determining next steps for the revision and/or adoption of Common Core Standards and the soon-to-be-released C3 Frameworks for the Social Studies.

Current NCSS President, John Moore, welcoming the 3500+ social studies educators in attendance to the conference in Seattle.

Some of the other Canada-focused sessions are featured elsewhere in this newsletter but I would like to express my gratitude now to Nadine Fabbi for coordinating a pre-conference clinic focused on the Arctic as well to Betsy Arntzen and Amy Sotherden, our colleagues at the Northeast NRC on Canada, as well as members of the NCSS Canada Community, like Ruth Writer, who personally and professionally supported the initiative. Several Canadian colleagues like Brenda Ball (Crofton House School –Vancouver, BC), Adam Woelders (Trinity Western University – Langley, BC), and Mike Perry-Whittingham (McMath Secondary School – Richmond, BC) worked diligently on the northern side of the border to support the effort as well!

Most importantly, I must acknowledge and thank two local teacher associates who performed outreach on my behalf at the NRCs on Canada exhibit booth when my own duties called me elsewhere. Carol Gnojewski and Kindra Kilgore, both teachers in Monroe, WA, hosted the exhibite and performed outreach by sharing K-12 STUDY CANADA resources with all who stopped by to learn more about Canada. They helped to recruit more than 350 educators as new members of the “Canada Listserv” who will receive emails from me every second month with tips and ideas for teaching about Canada. The new contacts represent 43 U.S. states, Puerto Rico, 4 provinces in Canada, and 6 other countries (China, Hong Kong, Hungary, Korea, Singapore, UK). These figures show just how effective the conference theme, “Opening Windows on the World”, was for Canadian Studies!

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December 2012
Who Owns the Arctic? Pre-NCSS Clinic

Amy Sotherden, Center for the Study of Canada/Institute on Québec Studies, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh presents on her 10-day visit to Nunavik, Canada in 2009.

As part of the 92nd National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) annual conference, “Windows to the World,” a pre-conference clinic on the Arctic was provided to educators. “This is an area that few students know anything about yet is vitally important to the future of not only our country, but to the world,” said one participant. “By studying this topic, students can be involved with geography international relations, economics, and government.”

The Arctic is receiving increased attention as a result of climate change, natural resource exploitation, and sovereignty issues. The region has become one of the most dynamic international regions in the world argued by some to be the new center of world politics. Eight Arctic nation-states claim rights to the Arctic including Canada, the United States, Russia, Finland, Denmark (Greenland), Sweden, Norway, and Iceland. In addition, many non-Arctic nation-states are seeking entry into the Arctic Council. In 2013 Singapore, India, China, South Korea and possibly the European Union will submit applications to join the Arctic Council. In addition, six Arctic indigenous organizations have status as Permanent Participants on the Arctic Council marking the first time in history indigenous peoples and national states are working together to make decisions that will impact the circumpolar world and beyond. Governance over the region is complex and dynamic.

On Thursday, November 15th, sixteen educators representing eight states attended the clinic, “Who Owns the Arctic?” held in the Maple Leaf Room of the Consulate General of Canada, Seattle. Educators who attended the session gained an understanding of global change in the Arctic, Inuit contemporary views relating to identity and interdependence, self-determination, population dynamics, language, modernization, cultural transition, social problems, and environmental matters.

One participant noted, “Who Owns the Arctic?” is an important workshop that helped me think about the geopolitical effects on countries in relation to the problems and issues of the Arctic that many educators are totally unaware of … this workshop was critical in helping me understand the indigenous issues related to the Arctic.”

Nadine Fabbi, U.W. Canadian Studies Center offered an overview of the geopolitics and territorial claims in the region. Amy Sotherden, Center for the Study of Canada/Institute on Québec Studies, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh and Betsy Arntzen, Canadian-American Center, University of Maine discussed their recent trip to the Canadian Arctic. Tina Storer, Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University, provided a presentation and packet of educational resources on the region.

This event was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers on Canada including the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada (Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS), University of Washington and the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University), the Northeast National Resource Centers on Canada (Center for the Study of Canada, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh and the Canadian-American Center, University of Maine); the eight U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers in JSIS (including Canadian Studies Center, Center for Global Studies, Center for West European Studies, East Asia Center, Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Middle East Center, South Asia Center, and Southeast Asia Center); the East Asia Resource Center, JSIS; the Consul General of Canada, Seattle; and, the Government of Québec.

Program

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December 2012
International Assembly & College and University Faculty Association Welcome Reception

Tamara Leonard (right), Associate Director the Global Studies Center in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies with Wendy Sue Fitzhenry, Trinity Lutheran School, and one of this year’s JSIS First-Timer Fellows.

One of the most active groups at the National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) meeting is the International Assembly and College and University Faculty Association (IACUF). This year the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies was a key sponsor of the IACUF reception that drew over 300 participants including higher education faculty members, high school educators, and graduate students. The IACUF provides a forum for communication, collaboration, and interchange of ideas among NCSS members from the United States and foreign countries.

Tamara Leonard, Associate Director, Global Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, provided welcoming remarks at the reception and spoke briefly about the role of the Jackson School in promoting international education at NCSS.

The reception was held on Thursday evening, November 15th at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Seattle. The IACUF reception was part of the 92nd NCSS Annual Conference held in Seattle from November 16-18, 2012.

NCSS is the world's largest professional development conference including over 500 content-rich sessions. This year’s conference was held in Seattle, Washington entitled, “Opening Windows to the World.” Founded in 1921, NCSS engages and supports educators in strengthening and advocating social studies. With members in all the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 69 foreign countries, NCSS serves as an umbrella organization for elementary, secondary, and college teachers of history, geography, economics, political science, sociology, psychology, anthropology, and law-related education.

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December 2012
Inuit Political Leadership in Canada & the World Today

Sixteen educators, representing eight states, attended the pre-NCSS clinic, "Who Owns the Arctic?" held at the Consulate General of Canada, Seattle.

As part of the 92nd Annual National Council for Social Studies Conference, “Windows to the World,” held in Seattle, November 16-18, Nadine Fabbi, Canadian Studies Center, offered a presentation on the effective involvement of the Inuit in domestic and international affairs and how that involvement is altering how we understanding international relations. The presentation covered some of the recent activities of the Inuit Circumpolar Council representing the Inuit in Russia, Greenland, Canada and the United States, and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Inuit association in Canada.

The presentation had ten participants each with a strong interest in international affairs. The participants gained an understanding of how global interdependence is shaping political institutions in the Arctic. The Arctic is an ideal lens via which to understand the broader issues of indigenous involvement in international affairs, social justice and environmental sustainability.

One participant noted that it was critical students understand what is occurring in the Arctic in order that they become more civically engaged particularly understanding the “cooperation among nations and indigenous peoples.”

This event was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers on Canada including the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada (Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS), University of Washington and the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University), the Northeast National Resource Centers on Canada (Center for the Study of Canada, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh and the Canadian-American Center, University of Maine); the eight U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers in JSIS (including Canadian Studies Center, Center for Global Studies, Center for West European Studies, East Asia Center, Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Middle East Center, South Asia Center, and Southeast Asia Center); and, the East Asia Resource Center, JSIS.

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October 2012
Canada in the Ida B. Wells High School at the U.W.
by Paulette Thompson, K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate

How often do you get to discuss Canadian literature and multiculturalism over breakfast with fellow educators over a weekend? Along with a group of 11 high school teachers and teacher-administrators from Washington State I had a chance to do just that while attending the Vancouver International Writers and Readers Festival in October 2000. The weekend was subsidized by the Canadian Consulate and organized by U.W.’s Canadian Studies Center. The main requirement along with breakfast discussions was that we attend sessions featuring Canadian authors and Canadian content.

On that Friday afternoon after a day of teaching, we headed north and braved the weekend traffic. We arrived into Vancouver, checked into the bed and breakfast, and then headed to Granville Island for our first foray – The Literary Cabaret.

The Literary Cabaret features an incredible band, Poetic License, and five to six authors. The Literary Cabaret helped me understand the concept of synergy. The musicians do not merely accompany the poets and authors; the music is an integral part of the presentation. I started imagining the projects that I could create in my classroom! The Literary Cabaret remains my favorite session to this day.

Concurrent sessions during the Writers Fest provided so many opportunities to engage. We even attended sessions on science writers, creative non-fiction writers, historians and poets as well as panel on whether writers have an obligation to be activists. We missed the sessions held earlier in the week featuring French-language authors.

That first whirlwind of a weekend got me hooked. I have attended the Writers Fest every year since. I believe paying to go to the Writers and Readers Festival from Seattle every year of great personal and professional value.

Although I haven’t received clock hours or credit since the early days, my students and colleagues benefit from my participation. I share what I hear, read and learn. Attending the festival inspires me as a writer and a teacher. I find that it really feeds my soul.

Every year at the Writers Fest I buy Canadian fiction and nonfiction, some for pleasure and others for teaching. I still try to find ways to incorporate Canadian content and authors in my classroom. It can be done.

Attending the Writers Fest helped me to adjust to my new teaching position as a Humanities teacher at the Ida B. Wells School for Social Justice at the University of Washington (http://depts.washington.edu/omad/ida-b-wells-high-school/). Ida B. Wells is an alternative high school that provides a diverse, multicultural curriculum and a coordinated studies approach to learning. This public school, serving about 40 students, is a joint-endeavor between U.W.’s Office of Minority Affairs, the U.W. College of Education, and the Seattle School District. At Ida B Wells, I include Canadian fiction in the World Literature section of Humanities. We read famous Canadian authors such as Nalo Hopkinson, Anne Cameron, J.B. McKinnon, Alisa Smith, Naomi Klein and David Suzuki.

At last year’s Writers Fest I heard a powerful poem by Jamaica-born Canadian poet and author Olive Senior. That poem, “Meditation on Yellow” (http://www.poetryinternationalweb.net/pi/site/poet/item/455/18408/Olive-Senior) demanded to be used in my curriculum last year when I taught Caribbean colonization. So I did!

In 2010 I attended a session where Canadian writers Wayne Grady and Merilyn Simonds were two of the panelists. Grady is primarily a science writer while Simonds is an essayist/novelist and a master gardener. The couple wrote a book together, Breakfast at the Last Exit Café , during a long road trip through the United States. As I listened to Grady and Simonds talk, I found their idea of reflective travel provocative. I bought the book and really enjoyed it. Both Simonds and Grady are Canadian-born yet in their book they write about being in situations as outsiders. Simonds lived in South America as a child while Grady found out as an adult that his father hid the family’s African American heritage. Students relate to the feeling of being outsiders. I decided that I could use it for Humanities as it works for history, government and Language Arts content. My students will be writing a one- two page response to Wayne Grady and Merilyn Simonds.

This year’s Writers Fest is on the horizon. I already have my tickets. And yes, I will be discussing Canadian and U.S. literature over lunch with family and the Canadian friends I’ve met at the Fest over the years. Wouldn’t it be great if my students could do the same?

Paulette Thompson is a K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate and alumna of the 32nd Annual K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute, Ottawa and Montréal, 2011. “STUDY CANADA,” the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada’s annual professional development workshop, has been offered by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University for the last 34 years serving educators from almost every state in the nation. The Institute is funded, in part, by a Title VI grant from International and Foreign Language Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education. Paulette is a Humanities and World Language Teacher in the Ida B. Wells School for Social Justice and a U.W. graduate student in Education, Curriculum and Instruction (Multicultural Education). View the K-12 STUDY CANADA website

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July 2012
2012 Community College Master Teacher Institute – Global Education for a Sustainable Future

Twenty community college educators, from as far away as Spokane Community College, participated in the 2012 Master Teacher Institute, Global Education for a Sustainable Future. (07/12)


This is one of the best professional development opportunities I’ve ever participated in! Also terrific networking opportunities.

Thank you for organizing this amazing two-day workshop!

In early July 2012 The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, in partnership with the Northwest International Education Association (NIEA), offered the 9th annual Community College Master Teacher Institute (CCMTI) at the University of Washington (UW). Nineteen faculty, from as far away as Spokane, participated in an effort to increase international content in their courses. This year’s institute was entitled, Global Education for a Sustainable Future.

Representing a wide-range of disciplines from sociology to geography to biology, the faculty expressed a need to prepare college students to deal with the global challenge of sustainability. “How can we teach global studies when our students have little background to understand the issues?” “How do we make complex global issues relevant to our students?” “How do we make peace between the efficiencies of business and economics while attempting to live sustainably?” These were just some of the opening questions discussed by the group of community college educators.

David Fenner, former Assistant Vice Provost for International Education at the U.W., set the tone for the day with a keynote lecture that argued for the critical importance of integrating international content into all college courses and for study outside the U.S. David noted that it is only when students are introduced to course materials that are global in nature that they can begin to actually tackle critical international issues in an effective manner.

Presentations covered a broad range of climate change impacts focused on Indonesia, Darfur, Canada and the Arctic, Central Asia, China, and Japan. Celia Lowe, Anthropology and JSIS, discussed the conceptual differences between food security and food sovereignty and their relationship to climate change. Frederick Lorenz, JSIS and UW Law School, provided a presentation, The Environment as a Source of Conflict: Darfur Case Study. Nadine Fabbi, Canadian Studies Center, discussed how the Inuit in Canada have changed the way we understand climate change by presenting it as a human rights abuse. Brett Walton, Circle for Blue, provided an overview of the connection of water to food, energy and health particularly in Central Asia. Anu Taranath, UW Department of English, provided a thought-provoking discussion on an analysis of the language used in global studies and how language is infused with meaning and how we see the world. Dan Abramson, UW Urban Design and Planning, presented on International Service Learning for Resilient Communities: Field Studios in Urban Planning and Design, and outlined how he conducted studio-abroad courses in China and Japan and drew comparisons between community integrity in Chinatowns in Vancouver, Canada, and Washington State.

A focus on the Inuit of Canada and their role in the politics of climate change formed a key part of the Institute. Nadine introduced educators to the growing awareness of human induced climate change over the last 20 years and to the role of the Inuit in Canada in making a link between climate change and human rights. Nadine pointed out that in 2005 Canadian Inuk political activist, Sheila Watt-Cloutier, along with 62 Inuit hunters from Canada and Alaska, filed a petition to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights charging the United States for human rights abuses. (The United States was singled out as it accounts for only 5% of the world’s population but produces about 25% of the world carbon emissions.) The petition effectively changed the politics of climate change and how the issue is perceived.

Faculty were provided a number of articles on climate change and human rights including the summary of the petition to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights presented by Sheila Watt-Cloutier. The following day Nadine led a discussion about how to incorporate the Inuit perspectives on climate change into their community college courses.

NIEA is a consortium of community colleges dedicated to increasing student and faculty opportunities for international education, training, and exchange. In 2003 Tamara Leonard, Center for Global Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, founded the Master Teacher Institute with NIEA. Since then, over 250 faculty from dozens of community colleges across Washington State have participated in the workshop benefiting from the expertise of Jackson School faculty and affiliated researchers.

This year Eva Dunn, Center for West European Studies and Tikka Sears, Southeast Asia Studies, co-chaired the Institute with Tikka acting as the facilitator throughout the two days. Jackson School students, Monick Keo, Canadian Studies Center and a major in Japanese Studies, and Eric Damiana, Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asia Studies, served as student assistants.

Funding for the Community College Master Teacher Institute was provided, in part, by grant allocations from the National Resource Center Programs, International and Foreign Language Education, U.S. Department of Education and the Northwest International Education Association.

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies is home to eight National Resource Centers: Canadian Studies Center, Center for Global Studies, Center for West European Studies, East Asia Center, Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Middle East Center, South Asia Center, and Southeast Asia Center.

Institute Program
Presenter Bios
Presentation Summaries

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August 2012
K-12 Educators Bring Canada to the Classroom
by Maureen Stevens, Educator, Belton Honea Path High School, South Carolina

Maureen Stevens (left), with STUDY CANADA Summer Institute colleague, Hope Bentley, from Grayson, GA.

The young people I teach will be tomorrow's leaders and therefore they need to realize the increasing importance of Canada and its role in a successful future for the United States. STUDY CANADA provided the knowledge and experiences needed to assist me in broadening the horizons of my students. I plan to incorporate the story of Canada in our study of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Civil War (focusing on the role Canada played in the Underground Railroad), and the study of Canada-U.S. relations throughout World Wars I and II.

I learned a great deal at the 34th Annual STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for Educators. It was a wonderfully exciting and activity-packed week. The trips to Montréal, to Parliament, to the Supreme Court, to the War Museum, Museum of Civilization, and the MOSAICA enabled me to experience Canada in a way no textbook would allow me to do. I will now be able to teach my students about Canada more effectively that prior to this experience were not possible.

I have not traveled extensively around the world. Unfortunately for my students, in the very rural high school where I teach, the majority of them have not traveled further than 150 miles from home. We are a rather poor rural, textile mill town. I teach U.S. History to eleventh graders. My classes range from 30 to 35 students. The STUDY CANADA Institute gave me the tools I need to best present this information to my students. The guest speakers discussed the geography of Canada, the peoples of Canada, the political and judicial systems, the bilingual impact, and the culture of Canada. Each of the presentations made an enormous impression on me.

Every minute was filled with exceptional speakers, engaging field trips, and immersion in the culture of Canada. The amount of knowledge I gained from this one week is overwhelming. I will encourage my colleagues to take part if at all possible in the future. I know that I have become a better teacher because of this experience and that my students will ultimately be the beneficiaries.

“STUDY CANADA,” the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada’s annual professional development workshop, has been offered by Western Washington University for the last thirty-four years and hosted in Canada since 2006. Don Alper serves as program director and Tina Storer as program coordinator. The Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University gratefully acknowledges program funding from the US Department of Education (Title VI) and the Government of Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. Additional program support is appreciated from the Université du Québec à Montréal and Herff-Jones Nystrom. In addition, support for teacher scholarships from the Canadian Studies Center in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington as well as Greg Boos and the Pacific Corridor Enterprise Council (PACE) is appreciated.

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May 2011
33rd Annual K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute
 

Tina Storer and Don Alper, chairs for the K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute, pose at the Terry Fox statue in Ottawa with Carol, educator in the Monroe School District.

Educators posing in front of the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa.

Rosemary and Mary Snow from South Carolina pose in front of Bill Reid's Haida Gawaii at the Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, Québec.

Educators posing during a tour of Old Montréal.

Twenty-Two educators from across the United States participated in the 33rd Annual K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute in Ottawa. They pose in front of the Parliamentary Library.

 

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April 2011
National Resource Center on Canada exhibits at National Council for History Education Conference 

Julia Warren (left) with Tina Storer.

 
Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist at Western Washington University’s Center for Canadian-American Studies, and Cynthia Carlisle, K-12 STUDY CANADA Teacher Associate from South Carolina, exhibited materials on behalf of both National Resource Centers on Canada to educators attending the National Council for History Education conference in Charleston, South Carolina on March 31-April 2, 2011.

Over 100 educators received a set of resources from each National Resource Center to assist them in teaching about Canada and were informed about the professional development workshops available in the summer. Forty educators from 19 states and 1 province (AZ, CA, FL, GA, IA, IL, KY, LA, MA, MI, MS, NC, NV, OH, OK, PA, SC, UT, VT and AB) showed significant interest in learning even more and signed up to join the Canada Listserv to receive regular e-resource news written by Tina Storer. Many of these teachers indicated an interest in registering for the summer institutes as well. Each National Resource Center also contributed two books as giveaways for prize drawings at the end of the conference to establish further interest in making connections to Canada in US history classrooms.

Exhibiting National Resource Center resources and networking with the US history teachers who attended the National Council for History Education conference encouraged to educators to include stronger connections to Canada in their classrooms. The take-away materials and sign-ups for the “Canada Listserv” will lead to increased visits to National Resource Center websites (rich with content, curriculum and resources) as well as registrations to both National Resource Center summer institutes.

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Winter 2011
Local Educator Enhances the Canadian Content in Her First Grade Classroom Thanks to STUDY CANADA Summer Institute and the Canada Valise

Martha Gibney's students

Dearest Tina,
I just wanted to tell you how much fun I have had teaching, and how much fun the first graders have had learning about Canada this fall. Their interest was initially piqued when the K-12 STUDY CANADA Resource Valise arrived. They have loved learning about the weather, geography and important landmarks in Canada. It has been particularly fun for them learning about the Arctic in this season so close to Christmas. It was not in my lesson plans, but the students are eager to figure out how exactly to get to the North Pole in order to find Santa!

The students are becoming much more proficient at their map reading skills. As you (and other instructors) presented in the summer course, these students do associate Canada with a vast frozen land. But, as they are learning about the varied landscapes and weather, they are seeing how Canada does have icy land, but it also has big cities, and farmland, and forests and important rivers and lakes.

The students have loved the story The Sweater. They are practicing their French-Canadian accents to mimic the voice on the DVD as they cheer for the Montréal Canadiens and Maurice Richard.

And, my students really are connecting to the Canadian value for diversity. I teach at a school that is quite diverse – about 50% of our families speak at least two languages (English and a home or native language). So, my students are naturally connected to what is clearly Canadian of being integrated into a multi-cultural community that appreciates and celebrates differences.

My students have figured out that I typically tie a field trip to any of our science or social studies units. So, they are certain that we are going to be field tripping to Canada soon. (Of course, I am all for this! I haven't exactly figured out the logistics of taking twenty-six first graders on an international field trip!)

Additionally, I have gotten a lot of great feedback from my students' parents, who are happy to see the kids using critical thinking skills in order to build their own knowledge about geography and the inter-connections between geography and communities.

I am so happy that I was able to participate in the STUDY CANADA Summer Institute as I learned so much in the process. I knew that I would be able to use the information in my classroom and now I am excited to report how beneficial the institute has been to my social studies instruction this year.

These students have learned a lot about Canadian geography. They have developed more and more questions about Canada and are eager to visit. And, I think we have about twenty-six newly indoctrinated Montréal Canadiens’ fans!

Happy Holidays to you. I hope you enjoy it with your family.

Martha Gibney
1st grade teacher, St. Matthew School, Seattle, Washington

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February 2011
World Affairs Council and Center Collaborate on Educator Program – Who Owns the Arctic?

Nadine Fabbi
Nadine Fabbi


On February 16th, more than 30 Puget-sound area teachers gathered together at the Pacific Science Center for a workshop organized by the World Affairs Council. Global Classroom was excited to partner with Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director, Canadian Studies Program (UW Jackson School of International Studies) and Zeta Strickland, education manager from Pacific Science Center for this three-hour program.

Both speakers encouraged teachers to grapple with the question (and title of the workshop) “The Arctic: Who Owns it and How Long Will it be There?” Nadine provided an hour presentation on policy formation by the eight Arctic nations and the unique role of Canada’s Inuit in Arctic governance. The evening ended with a visit to the NOAA designed “Science On a Sphere.” Teachers discovered how this room-size tool could be used to illustrate climate change, ocean temperatures, and other environmental and topographical information.

Participating teachers also received a 40-some page resource packet, a Canadian buffet dinner, and three clock hours. The evaluation responses were incredibly positive. In fact one teacher wrote: “A whole day (workshop) would have been awesome!”

About 40 local educators attended the workshop on the future of the Arctic.
About 40 local educators attended the workshop on the future of the Arctic.

Workshop information:
http://www.world-affairs.org/calendar.cfm?eventID=1379&action=eventDetails
In a few weeks, the resource packet will be available on line here:
http://www.world-affairs.org/globalclassroom/resourcepackets.htm

The Global Classroom program connects teachers and students with international resources, ideas, and people through a combination of professional development trainings, speaker series, curriculum design, and youth programs. The Arctic: Who Owns It and How Long will it be There, was one of a dozen teacher workshops that the World Affairs Council organizes every year.

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

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November 2010
Canada Clinic presented at the 90th Annual National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Conference
 

group of educators

Canada Clinic presenters and educators at the Canadian Consulate General in Denver, CO.

In early November, the two Title VI National Resource Centers on Canada – our Pacific Northwest NRC on Canada (that links the UW Center with the Center Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University) and the Northeast NRC on Canada (that links the Canadian-American Center at the University of Maine with the Center for the Study of Canada at SUNY Plattsburgh) – offered a pre-conference Canada Clinic: Looking Beyond the 49th Parallel at the 90th Annual National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Conference at the Consulate General of Canada in Denver.

Fourteen educators, mostly from Colorado and representing elementary through post-secondary schools, attended the clinic. “Canada is absolutely essential to preparing our students for the future,” explained one educator about her interest in the Clinic.

State standards in the United States are very broad and most often do not include Canada specifically. Yet, Canada and the United States have the largest trade relationship in the world. An incredible one million dollars of goods and services cross the border every minute of every day. For this reason, “One section of the Consulate is dedicated to trade,” noted Jamie Caton, political and academic affairs officer. “Canada buys almost three times more from the United States than China does.”

Carol Markham, Consul at the Denver Consulate, provided a background on the defense relationship between Canada and the United States. “Canada and the United States are founding members of the United Nations and NATO. We have fought together in World Wars I and II, in Korea, in the Gulf War, Bosnia, and Afghanistan. Most importantly, the two countries are intelligence allies. It is not in the psyche of Canadians to be a world power, rather Canada has gained a reputation as a peacekeeping nation.”

The workshop offered participants 8 clock hours of professional development credit and included six presentations: “Canada 101” by Jamie Caton and Karen Palmarini, Consulate General of Canada, Denver; “Canada’s Geography,” by Betsy Arntzen, Canadian-American Center, University of Maine; “History of Canada” by Ruth Writer, Michigan State University; “A Portrait of Québec,” by Chris Kirkey, Center for the Study of Canada, SUNY Plattsburg; “Canada’s North and Inuit Homelands,” by Nadine Fabbi, UW Canadian Studies Center; “Best Practices and Resources for Teaching Canada,” by Tina Storer, WWU Center for Canadian-American Studies who also chaired the clinic, and “Tales from Canada” by Michael Cawthra a K-12 STUDY CANADA teacher associate and professional storyteller from Denver. 

“My goal is to see Canada show up in our Colorado curriculum at the secondary level. We really need to see Canada in the state standards,” said Katie Lapp, former curriculum coordinator in Colorado. By comparison, the Canada-U.S. relationship is taught every year in Canadian high schools. Afterwards, another teacher commented, “This offers me an extraordinary opportunity to ‘discover’ Canada for myself and for my students”.

According to participant evaluations, all outreach objectives were ranked “excellent” to “outstanding” and the most beneficial aspects of the Canada Clinic were the “amazing amount of relevant info, clear, interesting, [and] well-prepared” as well as “the encouragement and help in understanding so many aspects of Canada and in accessing resources to enrich my classroom study of Canada.”

The special pre-conference clinic was the first in a series to be offered annually in conjunction with NCSS by the National Resource Centers on Canada. The two NRCs also shared a resource booth in the convention center’s exhibit hall, participated in NCSS International Visitors Program and Canada Community activities, and oversaw four additional conference sessions/workshops.

In 2011, the Canada Clinic will be offered at the Canadian Embassy when NCSS is held in Washington, D.C. and, in 2012, it will be offered in Seattle. Both Tina and I serve on the conference planning committee for Seattle 2012 and Tina was elected conference co-chair alongside, Margit MacGuire, Seattle University, Gayle Theiman, Portland State University, and John Moore, NCSS Vice President, Western Kentucky University.

The Canada Clinic four-year program is a Title VI grant-funded activity for the Pacific Northwest and Northeast National Resource Centers on Canada – U.S. Department of Education, International Education Programs Service – in partnership with Embassy and Consulate General of Canada offices in the United States.
 

Report and Evaluation

Daniel de Peyer, Tiffany Seybert, Cristal Tongish and Keith Millions engaged an Geography of Canada: Immigration Exercise.
Daniel de Peyer, Tiffany Seybert, Cristal Tongish and Keith Millions engaged an Geography of Canada: Immigration Exercise.

Ruth Writer, Teacher Associate and Outreach Coordinator, Michigan State University, provides an overview of Canadian history including the many intersections with U.S. history. Ruth Writer, Teacher Associate and Outreach Coordinator, Michigan State University, provides an overview of Canadian history including the many intersections with U.S. history.

Betsy Arntzen (left), University of Maine, and Karen Palmarini, Consulate General of Denver, taking notes from the Clinic.

Betsy Arntzen (left), University of Maine, and Karen Palmarini, Consulate General of Denver, taking notes from the Clinic.

Fourteen educators from Colorado and other states participate in the first Canada Clinic – a full-day clinic to be offered in conjunction with the annual National Social Studies Association conference.

Fourteen educators from Colorado and other states participate in the first Canada Clinic – a full-day clinic to be offered in conjunction with the annual National Social Studies Association conference.
The organizing team for the Canada Clinic enjoys a celebration dinner hosted by the Government of Canada. From left, Jamie Caton, Michael Cawthra, Nadine Fabbi, Tina Storer, Karen Palmarini, Carol Markham, and Betsy Arntzen. The organizing team for the Canada Clinic enjoys a celebration dinner hosted by the Government of Canada. From left, Jamie Caton, Michael Cawthra, Nadine Fabbi, Tina Storer, Karen Palmarini, Carol Markham, and Betsy Arntzen.

 

Nadine Fabbi provides a presentation on Inuit history and current self-determination efforts in Canada and globally.

Nadine Fabbi provides a presentation on Inuit history and current self-determination efforts in Canada and globally.

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Enelyn Vanderhoop from British Columbia gives several demonstrations on Naaxiin weaving techniques.
Enelyn Vanderhoop from British Columbia gives several demonstrations on Naaxiin weaving techniques.

November 2010
First Nations Weaver Brings Canadian Culture to Educators in the Region
 

In early November Canadian master weaver Evelyn Vanderhoop provided a series of programs at the University of Washington’s Burke Museum. During her residency, Ms. Vanderhoop demonstrated the Naaxiin (or Chilkat style) technique of weaving to school groups and the public and conducted an in-depth workshop for teachers and experienced weavers.

Evelyn Vanderhoop is from Masset, British Columbia, and comes from a long line of Haida weavers, including her grandmother Selina Peratrovich and her mother, Delores Churchill. She is one of only a handful of weavers who have mastered the skills required for Naaxiin weaving.

Ms. Vanderhoop talked with over 200 people during her stay, including 22 elementary students and chaperones from Tera Schreiber's Homeschool Group of Seattle, and 20 students and parents from Lorie Woods' 5th grade class from St. Joseph Marquette, Yakima. She explained, “Ravenstail and Chilkat weaving share several varieties of twining and surface braiding, although they differ in pattern, construction, weight, and composition of the warp. Both are used for robes, dance aprons and other ceremonial regalia and both types of weaving originally used wool from mountain goats. Contemporary weavers now substitute sheep wool. Traditionally, ranking members of clans and house groups wore these robes during dances or when officiating at ceremonies.”

A group of local educators enjoy an all-day workshop with Vanderhoop..
A group of local educators enjoy an all-day workshop with Vanderhoop.

On Saturday morning, 13 experienced weavers and local teachers were treated to a rare opportunity to attend a hands-on workshop in this almost forgotten style. Each started a small weaving of their own, and many lingered into the afternoon to soak up every bit of knowledge from this living treasure and great ambassador of Canadian culture.

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

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October 2010
K-12 Study Canada Activities

Tina Storer (second from left) with Karen Palmarini, Canadian Consulate of Canada, Denver, at the 32nd Annual K-12 STUDY CANADA Institute in Whistler, British Columbia, June 2010. In front, educator participants, Anastasia Sunday from Colorado, and Tom Cambisios, from Ohio
Tina Storer (second from left) with Karen Palmarini, Canadian Consulate of Canada, Denver, at the 32nd Annual K-12 STUDY CANADA Institute in Whistler, British Columbia, June 2010. In front, educator participants, Anastasia Sunday from Colorado, and Tom Cambisios, from Ohio

In October, Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist at the Center for Canadian-American Studies (WWU) exhibited K-12 STUDY CANADA exhibited resources onbehalf of the National Resource Center (NRC) for Canada at the Idaho Council for History Education (ICHE) conference in Boise, Idaho as well as the Washington State Council for the Social Studies Fall In-Service at Edmonds-Woodway. At the ICHE conference, the executive director of the National Council for History Education, Peter Seibert, invited Tina Storer to write a regular column for the organization's History Matters! publication. This will be an exciting new avenue for our NRC to encourage greater connections to Canada in history classrooms particularly. In addition, numerous educators signed up to join the NRC's "Canada Listserv" to receive regular emails (September-June) about recommended resources for teaching about Canada in K-12 classrooms at these two conferences as well as at a NRCs on Canada exhibit at the recent National Council for Geographic Education conference in Savannah, Georgia.

The K-12 STUDY CANADA portal is a joint project by our NRC. See http://www.k12studycanada.org/.

The UW Canadian Studies Center joins with the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University (WWU) in Bellingham to create a federally supported Pacific Northwest National Resource Center (NRC) on Canada. For more information on the Center for Canadian-American Studies at WWU see http://www.wwu.edu/canam/.

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September 2010
K-12 STUDY CANADA in Vancouver and Whistler

The K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute celebrated its 32nd year in Vancouver and Whistler this summer. Participants and presenters enjoy their last day in Whistler.
The K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute celebrated its 32nd year in Vancouver and Whistler this summer. Participants and presenters enjoy their last day in Whistler. Said one participant, "Out of all the programs, courses, and degrees that I have worked on, this course is by far the best."

This summer, the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada (Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University, and the UW Canadian Studies Center) held its 32nd annual K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute in Vancouver and Whistler, British Columbia. The week-long institute served twenty K-12 educators from across the US, including Colorado, Ohio, South Carolina, Montana, Georgia, California, Michigan, Virginia, and Washington.

This year, the program featured Joël Plouffe, WWU’s Visiting Scholar of Québec Studies and doctoral candidate at the University of Québec, Montréal. Joël, a scholar of Arctic geopolitics, provided the presentation, “A Portrait of Québec: Its History, People, and Politics.” Other presentations ranging from Canadian politics to economics to geography and history were provided by Karen Palmarini from the Canadian Consulate in Denver; WWU faculty Don Alper, Paul Storer, David Rossiter, Cecilia Danysk, and Tina Storer; and UW’s Nadine Fabbi. Field trips included tours of the 2010 Olympic Commerce Centre, Stanley Park, and downtown Vancouver, as well as the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre in Whistler.

Tina Storer (second from left), Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University and program coordinator with Summer Institute participants and beautiful downtown Whistler in the background.
Tina Storer (second from left), Institute program coordinator, with Summer Institute participants and beautiful downtown Whistler in the background.

The program, which will move to Ottawa in 2011, is the premier institute on Canada in the US. Participants enjoy one week of intensive presentations, field trips, and assistance with curriculum development. (Many curriculum projects are also available on the K-12 STUDY CANADA website.) Educators receive university credits or Washington state clock hours for attendance and completion of projects. As one 2010 participant stated, "Hands down, this was the best teacher workshop I have attended!"

Information about the 2011 Institute, A Capital View of Canada: Nations within a Nation, is also available online at: www.k12studycanada.org/scsi.asp

The Institute is coordinated by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, and Don Alper, Director, at the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University.

K-12 STUDY CANADA Program

The K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute is supported by a National Resource Center Title VI grant and an Outreach Grant from the Government of Canada.

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July 2010
34th Annual STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators

U.S. Ambassador to Canada, David Jacobson, with Institute participant, Diana Mackiewicz, Eagle Hill School, Massachusetts. (07/12)

I have participated in many professional development programs, both in the U.S. and around the world, and this is by far the best program! I enjoyed STUDY CANADA every single day and learned more than I could have imagined. Not only did I fall in love with Canada but I have also been inspired to teach it extensively in my classes. My students (and colleagues) will no longer have ignorance when it comes to our northern neighbor – they will come to value and appreciate Canada just as I have! – John Baldridge, Oklahoma

Once again the STUDY CANADA Summer Institute was a phenomenal experience! The content lectures were extremely informative, the guest presentations were enlightening and the special events were extraordinary. I am inspired to share the experience with colleagues to promote the teaching of Canada throughout the state. You have planned and organized a wonderful institute! Thank you! – JoAnn Trygestad, Minnesota

Once again, indeed, the 34th Annual STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators was a fantastic success. “STUDY CANADA,” the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada’s annual professional development workshop, has been offered by the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University, for the last thirty-four years and hosted in Canada since 2006.

First offered in 1978, 2011 marked the first year that STUDY CANADA was hosted in Ottawa, Ontario, with a daytrip to Montréal, Québec and used the thematic “A Capital View of Canada: Nations within a Nation” reflecting additional program content on Canada’s diverse regions and peoples. Fifteen participants registered for the program in 2012 and learned from distinguished Canadians throughout the week – a blend of university faculty from University of Ottawa, University of Québec at Montreal and Western Washington University as well as government officials from a variety of Canadian federal ministries and notable dignitaries such as the U.S. Ambassador to Canada, David Jacobson, the former Premier of Québec, Bernard Landry, and Member of Parliament for Ottawa-Orleans, Royal Gallipeau.

Program activities enriched teachers’ knowledge about Canada’s history and culture and served to make their STUDY CANADA experience “a perfect week!” These special activities included walking tours of both Parliament Hill in Ottawa and the “Vieux Port” in Montréal, private tours at the Supreme Court of Canada, the House of Commons and Senate, the Museum of Civilization as well as a cultural evening with traditional Quebec music at the Sucrerie de la Montagne in Rigaud, Québec. The capstone to the week of professional development was a group dinner in Ottawa supported by Herff-Jones Nystrom that was followed by a public viewing of the sound and light show “Mosaika” on Parliament Hill, where “the themes from our week together resounded” and served as a “a great ending to a great workshop” according to participant evaluations.

STUDY CANADA 2012 participants represented twelve states and a range of classroom experience, from elementary to secondary levels of education. Their evaluations unanimously indicated that STUDY CANADA not only provided a strong foundation for teaching about Canada but that the experience had profound personal and educational impacts that will be reflected in classroom curricula for the future.

Evaluations indicated that regardless of how much or how little attendees knew about Canada, the program taught them far more than was expected and was, as indicated earlier, awarded an impressive 99% grade overall. “I couldn’t have asked for a better week. Every aspect of the program was well planned with a variety of activities and speakers. The amount of resources exceeded my expectations… an absolutely wonderful experience!” Notably, all attendees intend to include Canada in their curriculum in more ways than originally anticipated and will submit curricula for posting on the www.k12studycanada.org website.

The Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University gratefully acknowledges program funding from the US Department of Education (Title VI) and the Government of Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. Additional program support is appreciated from the Université du Québec à Montréal and Herff-Jones Nystrom. In addition, support for teacher scholarships from the Canadian Studies Center in the H.M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington as well as Greg Boos and the Pacific Corridor Enterprise Council (PACE) is appreciated.

Program 
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June 2010
Canada and the American Curriculum: A Conference on State and National Perspectives on Canada in the US K-12 Curriculum
by Will Linser

From left: Tina Storer, Nadine Fabbi, Will Linser, Kelly Martin, Don Alper, and Amy Wilson
From left: Tina Storer, Nadine Fabbi, Will Linser, Kelly Martin, Don Alper, and Amy Wilson

Will Linser is President of the Washington State Council for the Social Studies and a high school social studies teacher in the Bellevue School District.

How often have you thought about the relationship between Canada and the United States and how important that relationship is? According to a 2010 study commissioned by the Embassy, based on 2008 data, 8 million US jobs depend on trade with Canada. Canada is also the United States’ largest supplier of imported energy.

On May 24 and 25, I attended the Canada and the American Curriculum: A Conference on State and National Perspectives on Canada in the US K-12 Curriculum. I was invited by the Canadian Studies Center at the University of Washington because of my leadership in social studies education in Washington State. The purpose of the conference was to work toward the goal of ensuring American students learn more about Canada through the K-12 curriculum and ensure that our students have a deeper understanding of our neighbors to the north. Without a doubt, this would improve Canadian-US relations.

We are fortunate in Washington state that we have the University of Washington’s Canadian Studies Center and the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University. When Dr. Christopher Kirkey, Director of the Center for the Study of Canada at the State University of New York College at Plattsburgh, presented during a session on "The K-12 National Directory on Canada: A Profile," it was quite obvious that we have done some great things in Washington state regarding Canada and including it in the K-12 curriculum. It is not required, but it is an excellent option for K-12 educators to use the resources, lessons, and classroom-based assessments in their classrooms.

Ms. Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director of the Canadian Studies Center at the University of Washingotn, and Ms. Kelly Martin, Social Studies and International Education Program at the Washington state Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), were on a panel on "State Perspectives on K-12: Canada and the American Curriculum." They talked about what we have been doing in Washington state and what more we can do.

Amy Wilson, International Education Programs Service and program office for Canada, served on a panel outlining the purposes of the conference. The keynote address, "Canada and International Education in the United States," was provided by Mr. Andre W. Lewis, Deputy Assistant Secretary for International and Foreign Language Education in the United States.

Where do we go from here? I have promised that the Washington State Council for the Social Studies will continue to support the teaching of Canada in the K-12 curriculum. This includes our Fall In-Service in Edmonds in October, the K-8 conference in late January/early February, and the spring conference in Chelan in March. We will also continue to promote UW’s and WWU’s "K-12 Study Canada" programming.

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

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Spring 2010
K-12 Leadership Conference in Chelan
by Kinda Kilgore

Kindra Kilgore
Kindra Kilgore

Kindra Kilgore, a Teacher Associate of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and K-12 STUDY CANADA, presented at the Washington State Council for the Social Studies conference in Chelan.

Ever wondered how to fit social studies into a crowded language arts curriculum? With all of the emphasis on reading and writing scores, social studies is often left out of the equation. Kindra Kilgore has found a way to bring both language arts and social studies into her 7th grade Humanities curriculum by using literature circles to ignite student interest and prepare for the Dig Deep Classroom- Based Assessment.

Kindra uses the K-12 STUDY CANADA resource, Canada, Northern Neighbor, developed by our consortium partners at the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University, as a foundation for instruction. Students work in cooperative groups to research the many geographical aspects of Canada. She then has students work in groups to read historical fiction written for young adults. Students research Canadian historical events through the novels. Individually, the students write research papers about these events to address the state CBA requirements. Finally, they present their research in groups using technology as a tool.

Participants in Kindra’s sessions at WSCSS commented that this form of instruction could work at any level and with any subject. One participant, who teaches social studies at the high school level, mentioned that this would help him work more closely with his partner teacher, who teaches English. They would be able to work together to create one integrated unit for both classes.

To learn more about using young adult historical novels in your classroom, you can find Kindra Kilgore’s power point presentation and materials on the Canadian Studies Center website.

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, U.S. Department of Education, Office of International Education and Graduate Program Services.

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Spring 2010
Film Series Closes with Canadian Film, Breakfast with Scot
by Natalie Debray

Natalie Debray

Natalie Debray is a lecturer in the Communication Department. She teaches courses on media in Canada and Québec.

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies National Resource Centers teamed up to offer an international film series, SMAK (See Movies at Kane). The series consisted of Thursday evening film screenings, held each week during winter quarter, and included films from around the world. The final film of the series, Breakfast with Scot (2007), is a comedy hailing from Canada.

Canada is a pioneer in gay rights, and Québec was the first in the world to pass anti-discrimination laws based on sexual orientation, in 1977. In 1999, the Supreme Court of Canada determined that gay and lesbian couples should have the same rights as heterosexual common law couples. As equality issues for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and trans-gendered individuals increase in social prominence across Canada, this theme became reflected in film. Breakfast with Scot is the coming of-age story of a boy coming to terms with his sexual orientation, set against the backdrop of the heart and soul of Canadian identity—hockey.

Breakfast with Scot is the first film with gay themes to be officially sanctioned by the National Hockey League (the NHL logo and the uniforms of the Toronto Maple Leafs are featured in the film)—no small feat for a sport broadly associated with machismo and brawn. As Scot comes of age, perhaps finally so does Canadian film, transcending language, regional differences, and cultural policy to appeal to audiences the world over.

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, U.S. Department of Education, Office of International Education and Graduate Program Services.

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Winter 2010
Une journée à la québécoise au coeur de Seattle
by Karen Boschker

Thierry Giasson, professeur à Université Laval et professeur invité Pacific Northwest-Québec Initiative en 2007, et Karen Boschker, enseignante de français à Issaquah, avec une réplique du Traité de la Grande Paix de Montréal.

C’était un beau samedi d’automne. Le soleil était au rendez-vous et de nombreux partisans des Huskys convergeaient sur l’Université de Washington. Vêtus de pourpre et d’or, les couleurs de l’équipe de l’université, ils étaient venus assister au match de football. Toutefois, dans un autre coin du campus, des professeurs de français se réunissaient pour participer à une journée francophone à la québécoise: la nouvelle édition de l’Atelier sur le Québec, organisé par le Centre d’études canadiennes de UW. Thierry Giasson, de l’Université Laval, qui était venu leur parler du Québec dans le cadre de cette nouvelle édition de l’atelier, allait également leur servir de guide tout au long de la journée. Il a commencé par raconté l’histoire politique qui a transformé le Québec de province de la France en Amérique en une nation française d’Amérique - un people doté d’une identité unique animée par son attachement à la préservation de la langue française en Amérique. Puis, il a tracé le portrait de la culture populaire québécoise, qui est dynamique et très appréciée des citoyens. Cette séance multimédia présentait les chansons du grand Félix Leclerc et de la chanteuse contemporaine Coeur de Pirate, de même que la poésie de Michèle Lalonde. Les extraits sonores de ces oeuvres sont d’ailleurs disponibles sur Internet. J’ai ensuite partagé les matériaux pédagogiques du stage que j’ai réalisé en 2007 à l’École de français de l’Université de Montréal. Enfin, Louis Léger, enseignant en musique, et son fils Devon, ethnomusicologue, nous ont fait chanter des chansons à répondre qui ont été popularisées dans le Québec francophone. L’atelier s’est conclut par un concert de La Famille Léger, qui se spécialise dans la musique traditionnelle québécoise et acadienne.

This workshop was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, U.S. Department of Education, Office of International Education and Graduate Program Services and by the Québec Government Office in Los Angeles.

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Spring 2009
Native Voices Alum Presents at Documentary Film Workshop

Rosemary Gibbons
Rosemary Gibbons, a Mimbres Apache / Chicana, is a co-founder of the Boarding School Healing Project and an active member of Incite Women of Color against Violence. Her film, A Century of Genocide in the Americas, captured the best documentary short award at the 2003 San Francisco American Indian Film Festival.


The Canadian Studies Center recently partnered with the Native Voices program and the other Jackson School Outreach Centers to bring the first Native Voices alum, Rosemary Gibbons, back to Seattle to discuss her award-winning documentary film, A Century of Genocide in the Americas: The Residential School Experience, at the Ninth Annual Documentary Film Workshop: Coming of Age in a Changing World.

The workshop brought together 45 K-16 educators from throughout the Pacific Northwest to analyze and discuss the uses of international documentary film in K-16 curriculum, and featured the films Persepolis, Young and Restless in China, and A Century of Genocide in the Americas. The keynote speaker of the event, Diana Hess, opened the day by framing documentary film as “perspective-laden narratives." The workshop was facilitated by Daniel Mirsky from the College of Education.

A Century of Genocide in the Americas is a poignant and painful look at the attempts to assimilate First Nations children at the turn of the twentieth century, resulting in families being split up, children losing their language and heritage, and widespread sexual abuse. After discussing this painful past, the film looks forward and focuses on healing practices now being utilized in Canadian communities, ending on a positive note. The film was well-received by the educators and they expressed a keen interest in being able to hear firsthand what Rosemary experienced in creating the film, and in using the film (of which every educator received a copy) in their classroom.

Rosemary Gibbon’s presentation and the Ninth Annual Documentary Film Workshop were made possible, in part, from the Center’s Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education and Graduate Program Services and by the Native Voices Program.

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Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu