University of Washington

Course List: Winter 2009

The following is a listing of Canadian Studies and Canadian content courses offered in Winter Quarter 2009. Students should check individual departments and the online Time Schedule for changes, departmental requirements for enrollment, SLN numbers, location and updated descriptions. See http://www.washington.edu/students/crscat/. To make an advising appointment, contact the Canadian Studies Student Advisor, Linda Iltis, at (206) 543-6001 or iltis@u.washington.edu.

FLAS Reception Photo Canadian Studies FLAS students attend the first inaugural Foreign Language and Area Studies Reception for the Jackson School of International Studies. From left, Erin Maloney, FLAS Fellow, Ethnomusicology, French; Daniel Hart, Chair, Canadian Studies; Dvorah Oppenheimer, Administrator, Jackson School; Tim Pasch, FLAS Fellow, Communication, Inuktitut; Julia Miller, FLAS Fellow, Linguistics, Dane-Zaa.

 

College of Architecture and Urban Planning
Urban Design and Planning
URBDP 474
TTh 10:00-11:50
Site Planning Issues and Techniques (3)
Canadian content focuses on cases from Vancouver, BC, including sophisticated view and shadow studies for high-rise development; high-rise residential typologies; and pedestrian- and transit-accessible shopping centers.
D. Abramson
URBDP 498 B
Th 2:30-5:20
Special Topics: Methods of Community Engagement (3)
Students will study the challenges associated with community-based preservation and revitalization planning in historic immigrant neighborhoods, focusing on Seattle's Chinatown-International District (C-ID), and drawing on a series of exchanges between community groups in the C-ID and Chinatown in Vancouver, BC.
D. Abramson
 
College of Arts and Sciences
Asian American Studies

AAS 372
MW 10:30-12:20,
F 10:30-11:20

Internment Camps North America (5)
This course will take a comparative approach to the internment and incarceration camps used to hold persons of Japanese ancestry in the United States and Canada during World War II.
T. Kashima
American Indian Studies
AIS 201
MTWTH 10:30-11:20,
F Quiz Sections
Introduction to American Indian History (5)
Readings, lectures, and films will contain some passing mentions of native North Americans whose territories and/or descendants were eventually included in/or under the jurisdiction of present-day Canada. This will include lecture references to oral traditions regarding earthquakes in the homelands of First Nations on the coasts of British Columbia, readings and a film concerning the historical traditions and colonial-era experiences of Iroquoian peoples, and discussions of a document from the Micmac people.
A. Harmon
AIS 270
TTh 12:30-2:20
Pacific Northwest Natives (5)
Examines indigenous societies on the Pacific Northwest's western slope, from southeast Alaska to California, including social structures and relations, subsistence strategies, belief systems, and changes over time, both before and after non-Natives' arrival.
D. Million
AIS 360 / C LIT 397
TTh 10:00-12:20
Indians in Cinema (5)
Studies representations of American Indians in American films from 1900 to present. These classes have 25% Canadian content with First Nations films and content.
L. Rhoades
AIS 378 / ENGL 457
TTh 3:30-5:20
Northwest Contemporary American Indian Literature (5)
Contemporary poets, authors and short fiction writers who are from the Northern Coast and Pacific Northwest. This is a "Northwest" that will for our purposes include Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. Starting with the oral traditions of these writers and their communities, the class addresses the transition made between oral storytelling and the work of contemporary authors, some whose work is nationally and internationally known.
D. Million
AIS 431 / SISCA 490 B / WOMEN 442
TTh 1:30-3:20
History of Native American Indian Education (5)
We will conduct an in depth study on one of the particular cultural groups in this region, the Makah and Nuu-chah-nulth people, who extend from the southwestern tip of western Washington, to the west coast of Vancouver Island. Course will examine their contemporary histories with a focus on their whaling tradition and on the issues that have arisen as a result of the Makah and Nuu-chah-nulth people’s decision to revive their whale hunts.
C. Coté
AIS 435
MTWTh 9:30-10:20
Spiritual Encounters, Indigenous Spirituality in the Contact Era (5)
The course takes a topical approach to the study of Indigenous spirituality. Canadian content is included in the sections on missions and christianizing; residential schools; the Indian Shaker Church; museum issues of representation and repatriation; and Native sovereignty issues.
M. Wright
AIS 465 / SISCA 490 C
MW 1:30-3:20
First Nations Filmmaking in Canada (5)
Course provides an overview of stereotypes of indigenous peoples/cultures in Canadian and US literature and popular culture. Explores First Nations filmmaking in Canada and how First Nations filmmakers are producing films that present "real" and positive images of their people, communities and cultures.
C. Coté
AIS 475
MW 10:30-12:20
Special Topics Indian Studies: Advanced Native Voices (5)
Documentary Production Seminar with a focus on cross-border indigenous documentary practices.
D. Hart
Art History
ART H 434
MW 10:30-11:50
Art and Ceremony in Northwest Coast Native Art (5)
An awareness of the changing roles of ceremonial arts on the Southern and Central Northwest Coast as a result of contact with Euro-American and Euro-Canadian cultures.
R. Wright
Communication
COM 451
MW 4:30-6:50
Mass Media and Culture (5)
This course will examine the role of media in contemporary society focusing on the political, social, and cultural ramifications. Using Québec/Canada as a case study the course will look at the media industries and how Québec/Canada experience the Americanization of media products.
N. Debray
Comparative Literature
C LIT 397 / AIS 360
TTh 10:00-12:20
Indians in Cinema (5)
Studies representations of American Indians in American films from 1900 to present. These classes have 25% Canadian content with First Nations films and content.
L. Rhoades
Economics
ECON 550
M 1:30-4:20
Public Finance: Expenditure Policy (3)
Theory of public finance with emphasis on public expenditures. Social welfare maximization, public goods and externalities, decreasing cost industries, theory of collective choice, second-best analysis. This course will include comparisons of major government programs between the US and Canada.
N. Bruce
ECON 551
W 1:30-4:20
Public Finance: Tax Policy (3)
Second-best analysis, optimal taxation, general equilibrium incidence analysis, issues in personal income taxation and corporate income taxation. This course will include comparisons of major government programs between the US and Canada.
N. Bruce
English
ENGL 457 / AIS 378
TTh 3:30-5:20

Northwest Contemporary American Indian Literature (5)
Contemporary poets, authors and short fiction writers who are from the Northern Coast and Pacific Northwest. This is a "Northwest" that will for our purposes include Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. Starting with the oral traditions of these writers and their communities, the class addresses the transition made between oral storytelling and the work of contemporary authors, some whose work is nationally and internationally known.

D. Million
Geography
GEOG 302
MWF 8:30-9:20
The Pacific Northwest (3-5)
This class makes reference to the history of settlement in the Northwest especially the role of the Hudson's Bay Company, and also addresses current forest products industry development in Canada as well as the US.
W. Beyers
GEOG 342
MW 1:30-3:20
Geographies of Inequalities (5)
This course considers the geographies of social, political and economic inequalities. Particular emphasis is placed on the US and Canadian experience, although some examples are drawn from other regions of the world, especially Europe.
K. England
GEOG 541
Th 2:30-5:20
Research Seminar in Feminist Geography (5)
This year the feminist geography seminar will explore three key themes in feminist scholarship: care, work and diversity. Feminist scholars have long troubled the public-private, production-reproduction dichotomies, and recent theorizing about the relationship between care and the economy continues that thread. The seminar seeks to unpack the concepts of care and work and investigate how they intersect with relations of gender, but also race/ethnicity, class, sexuality, legal status, and other social categories of difference. We also address how (or if) the patterns and processes associated with care, work and diversity shift with changes in labor force participation, governance and globalization. We further navigate these questions through issues such as care giving/receiving, wage-earning, care work, work-life balance, global migration and labor organizing. The empirical content of the course will include research that focuses on the Canadian context.
K. England
History
HSTAA 374 / WOMEN 384
MTWThF 1:30-2:20
Social History of American Women in the 20th Century (5)
Analyzes major themes in the history of women in North America from 1890 through the 1990s. Themes include family and community formation, social activism, education, paid and unpaid labor patterns, war, migration, and changing conceptions of womanhood and femininity in the 20th century.
S. Yee
Jackson School of International Studies
SIS 495 C
TF 2:30-4:20
Task Force: Arctic Sovereignty (5)
This course will look at the emerging international focus on the circumpolar region and address the debates over ownership of the seas and resources. The course includes a one-week fact-finding mission to Ottawa.
V. Gallucci, N. Fabbi
SISCA 490 B / AIS 431 / WOMEN 442
TTh 1:30-3:20
History of Native American Indian Education (5)
We will conduct an in depth study on one of the particular cultural groups in this region, the Makah and Nuu-chah-nulth people, who extend from the southwestern tip of western Washington, to the west coast of Vancouver Island. Course will examine their contemporary histories with a focus on their whaling tradition and on the issues that have arisen as a result of the Makah and Nuu-chah-nulth people’s decision to revive their whale hunts.
C. Coté
SISCA 490 C / AIS 465
MW 1:30-3:20
First Nations Filmmaking in Canada (5)
Course provides an overview of stereotypes of indigenous peoples/cultures in Canadian and US literature and popular culture. Explores First Nations filmmaking in Canada and how First Nations filmmakers are producing films that present "real" and positive images of their people, communities and cultures.
C. Coté
Women Studies
WOMEN 384 / HSTAA 374
MTWThF 1:30-2:20
Social History of American Women in the 20th Century (5)
Analyzes major themes in the history of women in North America from 1890 through the 1990s. Themes include family and community formation, social activism, education, paid and unpaid labor patterns, war, migration, and changing conceptions of womanhood and femininity in the 20th century.
S. Yee
WOMEN 442 / AIS 431 / SISCA 490B
TTh 1:30-3:20
History of Native American Indian Education (5)
We will conduct an in depth study on one of the particular cultural groups in this region, the Makah and Nuu-chah-nulth people, who extend from the southwestern tip of western Washington, to the west coast of Vancouver Island. Course will examine their contemporary histories with a focus on their whaling tradition and on the issues that have arisen as a result of the Makah and Nuu-chah-nulth people’s decision to revive their whale hunts.
C. Coté
     
College of Education
Educational Psychology
EDPSY 582
Th 1:00-2:50
Multilingual, Socialization and Development Research Education Group (3)
Indigenous groups and conducting research in indigenous communities. Students will be selecting research topics from Canada, the U.S. and other international countries.
B. Jegatheesan
     
College of Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering
CEE 582
MW 1:30-2:50
Intelligent Transportation Systems (3)
Part of this course covers the new technologies being implemented at the Canadian/US border crossing to speed the processing of passengers and freight through the international border, while simultaneously improving the security checks that are required to maintain national security and look for contraband substances.
M. Hallenbeck
Chemical Engineering
CHEM E 570 / PSE 488
MWF 1:30-2:20
High Polymers (3)
Includes content on Canadian tar sands and cellulose production.
G. Allen
     
College of Forest Resources
Environmental Science and Resource Management
ESRM 321
TTh 4:30-6:20
Finance and Accounting from a Sustainability Perspective (5)
The course covers energy in Canada including Imperial Oil utilizing Canadian oil companies fort the case studies.
D. Paun
Paper Science and Engineering
PSE 488 / CHEM E 570
MWF 1:30-2:20
High Polymers (3)
Includes content on Canadian tar sands and cellulose production.
G. Allen
     
Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs

GTTL 599
TTh 4:30-6:20

Introduction to Global Trade, Transportation, and Logistics (4)
This course considers issues of border security, international trade with Canada, and common transportation infrastructure.
G. Shelton
GTTL 601 GTTL Internship (1-9)
Opportunity to pursue GTTL-related issues that may not be explored in established UW courses. Most students pursue cross-border research topics.
G. Shelton
     
School of Law
LAW E 530
TWTh 10:30-11:20
Advanced Indian Law (3)
The Advanced American Indian law course will include a number of classes providing an overview of aboriginal rights in Canada.
 
LAW E 594
TTh 3:30-5:20
Environmental Law Clinic (4)
Examines applicable environmental law and procedure, skills training, and professional responsibility concerns in both Canada and the US.
M. Robinson-Dorn
     
Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs
Public Affairs
PB AF 530
TTh 11:30-12:50
International Affairs (3)
The course looks at the North American Free Trade Act, the Softwood Lumber dispute, and how the financial crisis has affected the Canadian market relative to the US market.
L. Anderson
     
School of Social Work
Social Welfare BASW
SOC WF 315
Th 12:30-1:20
Community Service Learning (2)
Opportunity for students to apply social work theory to practice, to advocate for social justice, and to be involved in community service. A special focus at the global level is directed at understanding how the US and Canada respond to global human needs.
S. De Mello
     
UW-Tacoma
Education
T EDUC 520
Th 8:30-11:30
Multicultural Education (3)
Explores major theoretical, political, and pedagogical issues in multicultural education.
A. Henry

T EDUC 521
T 4:30-7:00P

Education and Inequity(3)
Examines in more depth the dimensions through which power and oppression operate in American education, such as, race, ethnicity, language background, religion, sexuality, disability, and gender.
A. Henry




 

 

 

 

 

 

Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu