University of Washington

Course List: Spring 2009

The following is a listing of Canadian Studies and Canadian content courses offered in Spring Quarter 2009. Students should check individual departments and the online Time Schedule for changes, departmental requirements for enrollment, SLN numbers, location and updated descriptions. See http://www.washington.edu/students/crscat/. To make an advising appointment, contact the Canadian Studies Student Advisor, Linda Iltis, at (206) 543-6001 or iltis@u.washington.edu.

Previous course lists

Task Force Photo at the Healy Students in the 2009 International Studies Program Task Force on Arctic Sovereignty, visit the US Coast Guard Healy. The Healy did three cruises in the Arctic this last summer. Two of the cruises brought together US and Canadian scientists who worked collaboratively to measure the continental shelf off of the Arctic coast.


College of Arts and Sciences
College of Built Environments
College of Forest Resources
School of Law
College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences
Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs
School of Social Work
Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Programs
Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs
UW-Bothell


College of Arts and Sciences

American Ethnic Studies

AES 372 / WOMEN 322
TTh 2:30-4:20
Race, Class and Gender (5)

L. Ross
The intersection of race, class, and gender in the lives of women of color in the United States from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics include racism, classism, sexism, activism, sexuality, and inter-racial dynamics between women of color groups.

American Indian Studies

AIS 203
TTh 4:30-6:20
Introduction to Philosophical and Aesthetic Universes (5)
G. Witherspoon
The students will learn an Indigenous perspective on both the development of First Nations cultures in North America and on the Indigenous impact on the development of Second American culture in the United States. They will also learn the political and social philosophies of the Iroquois, the ecological philosophies and practices of the Lakota, and the aesthetic (arts and music) styles of the Navajos and others First Nations peoples, as well as the impact First Nations cultures have had on the evolution of 20th century Second American art.
AIS 240
MW 1:30-3:20
Native North American Women (5)
M. Wright
The power and importance of Native American women will be explored and analyzed in this class. We will focus on issues such as economic power, the life cycle, matriarchy, spirituality, menstruation, gender roles and third genders, women in leadership, artists and their products, sovereignty issues, protests and reforms, response to historical situations, and current issues such as use of the word 'squaw' and honoring victims of the Sand Creek Massacre.
AIS 340
WF 12:30-2:20
Indian Children and Families (5)
D. Million
The class focuses on their challenges but is also focused on the solutions that American Indian peoples have sought. Topics include: 20th-21st century American Indian family demographics, studies of traditional family structures, western nation-state interventions such as boarding school and social science and social welfare management. It also discusses in particular Indian Child Welfare practices in the United States and some comparison of programs and issues in Canada.
AIS 444 / WOMEN 444
TTh 1:30-3:20
Criminality and "Deviance" in Native Communities (5)
L. Ross
Seminar based on social science writings and biographies written by and about incarcerated natives and "deviance" in Native communities in the United States and Canada.
AIS 446 / HSTAA 446
MTWTh 9:30-10:20
American Indian Economic History (5)
A. Harmon
Surveys and analyzes the history of American Indians' economic challenges and strategies. Topics include the economic cultures of Indigenous North American societies, the impacts of European colonization and US government policies, and tribal strategies aimed at improving Indians' economic circumstances.
AIS 451
WF 3:30-5:20
Critical American Indian Studies Issues (5)
D. Million
Critical Conversations is a seminar/discussion class where students can explore and develop critical thinking on significant issues in the field of American Indian Studies.
AIS 475
MTWTh 10:30-11:20
Special Topics Indian Studies: Indians and Museums (5)
 
Current research and readings in American Indian Studies content areas.
AIS 501
TTh 11:30-1:20
Documentary Research Seminar (5)
D. Hart
Seminar exploring theoretical, methodological, and aesthetic issues when researching documentary film and video projects in Native American communities.

Anthropology

ANTH 310
TTh 11:30-1:20
Native North American Society (5)
K. Capuder
Traditional cultures of America north of Mexico, emphasizing diversity of North American Indian and Eskimo societies. Origins of Native-American culture areas and language groupings; subsistence systems; levels of social organization; European conquest and colonialism; and description of representative cultures from the ten culture areas.

Communication

COM 302 / CHID 370
TTh 11:30-1:20
F Quiz Sections
The Cultural Impact of Information Technology (5)
N. Debray
Utilizing approaches from the history of technology, cultural studies, and literary theory, seeks to analyze the cultural and social impact of information technology. Considers how information technologies impact our relationships with others, our concept(s) of self, and the structure of the communities to which we belong.
COM 321 / POL S 330
TTh 2:30-4:20
Communication and International Relations (5)
N. Debray
Looks at communications in relations between international groups and states. Examines the range of functions and roles communication media play in international affairs, global issues, and intergroup relations. Also examines the strategic use of communications by various groups.

Comparative History of Ideas

CHID 370 / COM 302
TTh 11:30-1:20
F Quiz Sections
The Cultural Impact of Information Technology (5)
N. Debray
Utilizing approaches from the history of technology, cultural studies, and literary theory, seeks to analyze the cultural and social impact of information technology. Considers how information technologies impact our relationships with others, our concept(s) of self, and the structure of the communities to which we belong.

Geography

GEOG 277
MWF 1:30-2:20
Th Quiz Sections
Geography of the Cities (5)
K. England
This course will develop your understanding of the geographic nature of urban systems and the internal spatial patterns and activities within cities. Particular emphasis is placed on the US and Canadian experience, although some examples will be occasionally drawn from other regions of the world.
GEOG 350
MWF 1:30-2:20
Marketing and Retail Geographies (5) J. Harrington
Introduction to the geography of retailing and consumer behavior. Focuses on methods of analyzing market areas at multiple scales. Reviews work in the cultural-geographic interpretation of retailing and marketing. Empirical examples focus on the United States and Great Britain, but additional international information is included.
GEOG 380
TTh 3:30-6:20
Th Quiz Sections
Geographic Patterns of Health (5)
J. Mayer
The purpose of this class is to give students an introduction to geographic research into disease and health, and a solid background in the core concepts of medical geography. The course will be divided into two sections; the study of disease ecology; and the examination of the geography of health services and special topics in medical geography. The distribution of chronic diseases common in the United States and other western nations will also be examined.
GEOG 440
MWF 11:30-12:50
Regional Analysis (5)
W. Beyers
This course covers a number of frequently used method of regional analysis. Methods include descriptive techniques such as location quotients, coefficients of regional specialization, indices of industrial concentration, and shift-share analysis. Regional economic models are considered in-depth, including economic base, survey and nonsurvey regional input-output models, and regional econometric models.
GEOG 480
MW 12:30-2:20
Environmental Geography and Health (5)
J. Majer
Demonstrates and investigates how human-environment relations are expressed in the context of health and disease. Local and global examples emphasize the ways medical geography is situated at the intersection of the social, physical, and biological sciences. Examines interactions between individual health, public health, and social, biological, and physical phenomena.

History of the Americas

HSTAA 221
TTh 10:30-12:20
F Quiz Sections
Environmental History of the US (5)
L. Nash
In this class, we will move beyond traditional historical frameworks that consider only human actions and human society to ask how people have transformed the natural environments of North America and how those environments have influenced American history.
HSTAA 401
TWTh 1:30-2:50
The American Revolution (5)
R. Johnson
This course will study the American Revolution, from its mid-eighteenth century origins to the ratification of the Federal Constitution of 1787, with some analysis of loyalism in the Revolution and its impact on Canada.
HSTAA 432
TTh 12:30-1:50
F Quiz Sections
History of Washington State and the Pacific Northwest (5)
J. Findlay
This course looks at British Columbia as part of a broader survey of the Pacific Northwest, 1750-2000.

Linguistics

LING 451 / 551
TTh 10:30-12:20
Phonology I (5)
S. Hargus
Speech sounds, mechanism of their production, and structuring of sounds in languages; generative view of phonology; autosegmental and metrical phonology.
LING 580 E/F
W 3:30-5:50
Problems in Linguistics: Historical Phonology (5)
S. Hargus

Political Science

POL S 330 / COM 321
TTh 2:30-4:20
F Quiz Sections
Communication and International Relations (5)
N. Debray
Looks at communications in relations between international groups and states. Examines the range of functions and roles communication media play in international affairs, global issues, and intergroup relations. Also examines the strategic use of communications by various groups.

Women Studies

WOMEN 322 / AES 322
TTh 2:30-4:20
Race, Class and Gender (5)
L. Ross
The intersection of race, class, and gender in the lives of women of color in the United States from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics include racism, classism, sexism, activism, sexuality, and inter-racial dynamics between women of color groups.
WOMEN 323
MTWThF 9:30-10:20
History of Racial Formation in the United States: 1800-1990 (5)
S. Yee
Traces the development of the concept of race in the United States from the nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. Specific topics include paid and unpaid labor, media, reproduction, migration, social activism, and the processes of identity and community formation.
WOMEN 490
TTh 11:30-1:20
Special Topics in Women Studies: Native Voices Seminar Documentary Research Methods in Native Communities (2-5)
L. Ross

College of Built Environments

Urban Planning

URBDP 370
MW 10:30-12:50
Reading the City (5)
D. Ryan
Comprehending cities as reflection of individual reader and social/cultural context. Skills for analyzing everyday, visible evidence of the city. Topics include self-identity with place, city, image and perception, visual design analysis and place as representation of culture.
URBDP 422
MW 8:30-10:20
Geospatial Analysis (5)
M. Alberti
Principles of GIS applied to problems in urban design and planning, landscape architecture, and environmental and resource studies. Practical problem-solving approaches using contemporary desktop mapping packages and vector and raster GIS systems. Siting, environmental evaluation and inventories, and modeling.
URBDP 507
TTh 1:30-5:20
General Urban Planning Laboratory (4)
B. Born
Studio/field project in applied professional planning of a comprehensive nature, utilizing a local study area to examine the realities of problem solving in situations of functional and normative conflict. Integration of analysis, programming, implementation, and presentation phases of the planning process.
URBDP 565
MW 9:00-10:20
American Urban History (3)
M. Chalana
Intensive lecture/seminar designed to provide students the opportunity for the immersion in historical scholarship that addresses the social, economical, political, technological, and cultural forces that have shaped the development of American cities.
URBDP 573
MW 1:30-3:20
Digital Design (4)
M. Chalana
Uses digital technologies for mapping, drafting, modeling and communication. Includes real-world case study projects that focus on urban design and planning issues.
URBDP 576
M 1:30-4:20
Pedestrian Travel (3)
A. Vernez-Moudon
The course concentrates on walking as a mode of transportation in cities and city-regions. Cities today occupy vast areas that are easily traveled via motorized means of transportation. However, a substantial portion of travel in cities covers relatively short distances that can, and perhaps should, be walkable, or covered by non-motorized means of transport such as bicycling, scootering, roller-skating, or roller-blading.

College of Forest Resources

College of Forest Resources

CFR 519
W 6:00-9:50
Conducting and Publishing an Industry Performance Review (3)
D. Paun
Focuses on the concepts of accounting, finance, and financial statement analysis; techniques for analyzing firm performance; and conducting competitor analyses. Conduct in-depth comparative performance analyses of US and Canadian paper firms and publish the findings as a peer-reviewed manuscript in a journal.

Environmental Science and Resource Management

ESRM 401 A/B Spring Comes to the Cascades (3)
T. Hinckley
Examines the interaction between forests, environment and growth at three locations in the Cascades, from lowlands to alpine. Field trips and associate observations are linked to classroom or group project activities and are used to understand a number of ecological, physiological and meteorological concepts.

Paper Science and Engineering

PSE 450
F 12:30-1:20
PSE Seminar (1)
G. Allen
Discussion of current topics in the science and technology of pulp and paper production. Emphasis on employer expectations of students in the paper science industry.

School of Law

LAW E 594
TTh 3:30-5:20
Environmental Law Clinic (4)
M. Robinson-Dorn
Examines applicable environmental law and procedure, skills training, and professional responsibility concerns in both Canada and the US.

College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences

Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

FISH 439 / ENVIR 439 / PB AF 595 B/C
T 11:30-1:20
T/W Quiz Sections
Attaining a Sustainable Society (3)
J. Karr
This course includes a comparative analysis of US and Canadian political and other systems and approaches that deal with societal sustainability. One of the key course texts, A Short History of Progress, is by Canadian author Ronald Wright that was part of the Massey Lecture Series.
FISH 458
MWF 9:30-10:20
T 2:30-4:20
Fisheries Stock Assessment (4)
R. Hilborn
Emphasizes quantitative analysis of fisheries data to determine how the fishery would respond to alternative management actions. Major topics include production models, stock and recruitment, catch at age analysis, and formulation of harvest strategies.

Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs

Public Affairs

PB AF 532
F 9:30-12:20
Managing Policy in a Global Context (3)
L. Anderson
Examines different policy environments leaders must address to achieve policy in comparative and international settings. Includes strategies, tactics, and frameworks needed to initiate and sustain policy dealing with authoritarian, democratic, liberal, and one-party states. Focuses on pressures from the international system and issues such as globalization.
PB AF 595 B/C / ENVIR 439 / FISH 439
T 11:30-1:20
T/W Quiz Sections
Attaining a Sustainable Society (3)
J. Karr
This course includes a comparative analysis of US and Canadian political and other systems and approaches that deal with societal sustainability. One of the key course texts, A Short History of Progress, is by Canadian author Ronald Wright that was part of the Massey Lecture Series.
PB AF 605D
F 12:30-3:20
Degree Project: Institutions and Decision Making (1-6)
L. Anderson
How does individual decision making differ in response to the incentives created by institutions and institutional change? Topics related to international, rural, or poverty issues are especially welcome.

School of Social Work

Social Welfare BASW

SOC WF 315
Th 12:30-1:20
Community Service Learning (2)
S. De Mello
Opportunity for students to apply social work theory to practice, to advocate for social justice, and to be involved in community service. A special focus at the global level is directed at understanding how the US and Canada respond to global human needs.
SOC WF 405A
M 4:30-5:20
Fieldwork Seminar (1) S. De Mello
This is a seminar course where students will have a chance to, among other issues, compare and contrast social work practices and policies across the 49th parallel. (Once a year the course takes students to Canada.)
SOC WF 415 Begin Field Instruction, Practicum (4) S. De Mello
Students are placed in selected social service agencies and accept beginning social service assignments under the supervision of competent agency personnel. Some students engage in joint, Canada-US practicum activities.

Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Programs

Program on the Environment

ENVIR 439 / FISH  439 / PB AF 595 B/C
T 11:30-1:20
T/W Quiz Sections
Attaining a Sustainable Society (3)
J. Karr
This course includes a comparative analysis of US and Canadian political and other systems and approaches that deal with societal sustainability. One of the key course texts, A Short History of Progress, is by Canadian author Ronald Wright that was part of the Massey Lecture Series.

Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs

Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies

GTTL 600 Independent Study (1-10)
G. Shelton
Opportunity to pursue GTTL-related issues that may not be explored in established UW courses. Most students pursue cross-border research topics.
GTTL 601 GTTL Internship (1-9)
G. Shelton
Opportunity to pursue GTTL-related issues that may not be explored in established UW courses. Most students pursue cross-border research topics.

UW-Bothell

Education

B EDUC 408
Th 5:30-8:30
Knowing, Teaching, and Assessing in Multicultural Education and Social Studies (5)
C. Banks
Explores major theoretical, political, and pedagogical issues in multicultural education, including issues in Canada.

Nursing

B NURS 598H Scholarly Project (1-6)
C. Leppa
Scholarly inquiry with in-depth, focused analysis, culminating in a written product/report for dissemination.
Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu